165

Should I use double =, or triple =?

if(a === null)  {
//do something
}

or

if(a == null)  {
//do something
}

Similarly for 'not equals':

if(a !== null)  {
//do something
}

or

if(a != null)  {
//do something
}
1

6 Answers 6

248

A structural equality a == b is translated to

a?.equals(b) ?: (b === null)

Therefore when comparing to null, the structural equality a == null is translated to a referential equality a === null.

According to the docs, there is no point in optimizing your code, so you can use a == null and a != null


Note that if the variable is a mutable property, you won't be able to smart cast it to its non-nullable type inside the if statement (because the value might have been modified by another thread) and you'd have to use the safe call operator with let instead.

Safe call operator ?.

a?.let {
   // not null do something
   println(it)
   println("not null")
}


You can use it in combination with the Elvis operator.

Elvis operator ?: (I'm guessing because the interrogation mark looks like Elvis' hair)

a ?: println("null")

And if you want to run a block of code

a ?: run {
    println("null")
    println("The King has left the building")
}

Combining the two

a?.let {
   println("not null")
   println("Wop-bop-a-loom-a-boom-bam-boom")
} ?: run {
    println("null")
    println("When things go null, don't go with them")
}
8
  • 2
    why don't you use if for null checks? a?.let{} ?: run{} is only appropriate in rare cases, otherwise it is not idiomatic
    – voddan
    May 15, 2016 at 7:29
  • 2
    @voddan I wasn't suggesting not using if for null checks, I was listing other viable options. Although I'm not sure if run has some kind of performance penalty. I'll update my answer to make it more clear. May 15, 2016 at 19:02
  • 4
    @voddan If a is a var, then using the a?.let{} ?: run{} guarantee that it will be bound properly in the let for the whole scope. If a is a val, then there is no difference.
    – madeinqc
    Mar 15, 2019 at 18:11
  • 2
    @madeinqc if a is a val, then using let is different and it's bad. I found this article very good at explaining it - Kotlin: Don’t just use LET for null check.
    – Sufian
    Oct 4, 2019 at 14:00
  • @voddan I'm new to Kotlin. Would you please explain or provide a URL noting how this is not idiomatic?
    – Bink
    Dec 17, 2020 at 16:12
95

Kotlin ways of handling null

Secure Access Operation

val dialog: Dialog? = Dialog()
dialog?.dismiss()  // If the dialog is null, the dismiss call will be omitted

Let function

user?.let {
  // Work with non-null user
  handleNonNullUser(user)
}

Early exit

fun handleUser(user: User?) {
  user ?: return // Exit the function if user is null
  // Now the compiler knows user is non-null
}

Immutable shadows

var user: User? = null

fun handleUser() {
  val user = user ?: return // Return if null, otherwise create immutable shadow
  // Work with a local non-null variable named user
}

Default value

fun getUserName(): String {
 // If our nullable reference is not null, use it, otherwise use non-null value 
 return userName ?: "Anonymous"
}

Use val instead of var

val is read-only, var is mutable. It's recommended to use as many read-only properties as you can, they are thread-safe.

Use lateinit

Sometimes you can't use immutable properties. For example, it happens on Android when some property is initialized in onCreate() call. For these situations, Kotlin has a language feature called lateinit.

private lateinit var mAdapter: RecyclerAdapter<Transaction>

override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
   super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
   mAdapter = RecyclerAdapter(R.layout.item_transaction)
}

fun updateTransactions() {
   mAdapter.notifyDataSetChanged()
}
3
  • I'd call the last one "default value" (not elvis), since 3/4 of those are using elvis. Apr 16, 2019 at 14:31
  • @AjahnCharles makes sense )) Apr 16, 2019 at 16:16
  • 1
    this is garbage, any language modern can deal better with optionals than this. its more a chore than a benefit for programmers.
    – JBarros35
    Sep 25, 2020 at 16:25
71

Both approaches generate the same bytecode so you can choose whatever you prefer.

1
  • 9
    If i understood it correctly then he is asking for best way to check null in Kotlin, not which approach generates best byte-code.@BenitoBertoli answer looks promising, it's reduces boilerplate code Dec 1, 2017 at 12:30
19

Addition to @Benito Bertoli,

the combination is actually unlike if-else

"test" ?. let {
    println ( "1. it=$it" )
} ?: let {
    println ( "2. it is null!" )
}

The result is:

1. it=test

But if:

"test" ?. let {
    println ( "1. it=$it" )
    null // finally returns null
} ?: let {
    println ( "2. it is null!" )
}

The result is:

1. it=test
2. it is null!

Also, if use elvis first:

null ?: let {
    println ( "1. it is null!" )
} ?. let {
    println ( "2. it=$it" )
}

The result is:

1. it is null!
2. it=kotlin.Unit
1
  • Your code doesn't compile on 1.7.20. let is an extension function and you are using it as normal function in first 2 cases.
    – K.H.
    Oct 21, 2022 at 14:30
6

Check useful methods out, it could be useful:

/**
 * Performs [R] when [T] is not null. Block [R] will have context of [T]
 */
inline fun <T : Any, R> ifNotNull(input: T?, callback: (T) -> R): R? {
    return input?.let(callback)
}

/**
 * Checking if [T] is not `null` and if its function completes or satisfies to some condition.
 */
inline fun <T: Any> T?.isNotNullAndSatisfies(check: T.() -> Boolean?): Boolean{
    return ifNotNull(this) { it.run(check) } ?: false
}

Below is possible example how to use those functions:

var s: String? = null

// ...

if (s.isNotNullAndSatisfies{ isEmpty() }{
   // do something
}
0

I want to respond to answers of @Benito Bertoli and @BingLi224 and provide imho correct solution.

Problem is with using let, because result of let is it's last expression. You just want to pass the same thing as is passed into it, so also is a better solution. At the same time, after using elvis operator, let is impossible to use, because there is no object to call extension function to so I am using run (functional version). More on that in the scope functions official documentation

Another downside of this compared to using if/when is not being able to use this as an expression so I wouldn't recommend using it :-)

Final code:

"test"?.also {
    println("1. it=$it")
} ?: run {
    println("2. it is null!")
}

"test"?.also {
    println("1. it=$it")
    null
} ?: run {
    println("2. it is null!")
}

null?.also {
    println("1. it is null!")
} ?: run {
    println("2. it is null")
}

null?.also {
    println("1. it is null!")
    null
} ?: run {
    println("2. it is null")
}

And output:

1. it=test
1. it=test
2. it is null
2. it is null

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