10

For example, there is a function that finds an object and returns shared_ptr if object is found, and must indicate somehow that no object was found.

std::vector<std::shared_ptr> Storage::objects;

std::shared_ptr<Object> Storage::findObject()
{
  if (objects.find)
  {
    return objects[x];
  }
  else
  {
    return nullptr;
  }
}

std::shared_ptr<Object> obj = Storage::findObject();
if (obj)
{
  print("found");
}
else
{
  print("not found");
}
  1. Is it correct to return shared_ptr implicitly initialized with nullptr like in upper example? It will work, but can be it done this way? Or should I return shared_ptr default constructed instead?

  2. What in case it would be weak_ptr? What is proper way to check that empty weak_ptr has been returned? by weak_ptr::expired function or are there other ways? If checking by weak_ptr::expired is the only way then how can I distinguish that function returned empty pointer, or object was just deleted(multi-thread environment)?

  • 1
    @AndersK. Situation when object is not found is as common situation as if object is found. – John Lock May 15 '16 at 5:58
  • 1
    If you can use boost, optional<T> seems to be exactly what you want (this seems to be coming into the standard in C++17). If you don't want the overhead, then you basically just have to document that a nullptr is in fact an absence of value and not a mistake. – user2296177 May 15 '16 at 6:05
  • 1
    @JohnLock: No, there is no difference. – Benjamin Lindley May 15 '16 at 6:17
  • 1
    @BenjaminLindley: From (cplusplus.com/reference/memory/shared_ptr ) - "A shared_ptr that does not own any pointer is called an empty shared_ptr. A shared_ptr that points to no object is called a null shared_ptr and shall not be dereferenced. Notice though that an empty shared_ptr is not necessarily a null shared_ptr, and a null shared_ptr is not necessarily an empty shared_ptr." – John Lock May 15 '16 at 6:19
  • 1
    @JohnLock: That's wrong. – Benjamin Lindley May 15 '16 at 6:21
12

Is it correct to return shared_ptr implicitly initialized with nullptr like in upper example?

Yes, it is correct to initialize shared_ptr with nullptr. It is also correct to assign nullptr to shared_ptr.

Or should I return shared_ptr default constructed instead?

You can do this in both ways:

  1. returning shared_ptr initialized with nullptr

    return shared_ptr<Object>(nullptr);
    
  2. returning shared_ptr default constructed.

    return nullptr;
    

Both ways are correct and both have the same effect. You can use whatever way you want.

What in case it would be weak_ptr? What is proper way to check that empty weak_ptr has been returned? by weak_ptr::expired function or are there other ways?

weak_ptr becomes nullptr (expires) whenever the last shared_ptr associated with object is destroyed.

The proper way to work with weak_ptr is to convert it to shared_ptr with lock method, and then to work with created shared_ptr. In that case your weak_ptr will no expire until you have that new shared_ptr. If you don't convert weak_ptr into shared_ptr, your weak_ptr may expire at any moment.

And yes, before working with newly created shared_ptr, you must check that it isn't null, because weak_ptr may had been expired before you created shared_ptr with lock method.

std::weak_ptr<Object> Storage::findObject();

...

std::weak_ptr  <Object> weak   = Storage::findObject();
std::shared_ptr<Object> shared = weak.lock();
if (shared) // check that weak was not expired when we did "shared = weak.lock()"
{
    // do something with shared, it will not expire.
}

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