5

I have model like this

class test extends Model
{

public   $rules = [
    'title' => 'required',
    'name' => 'required',
];
protected $fillable = ['title','name'];
}

And controller like this

public function store(Request $request)
{
    $test=new test; /// create model object
        $validator = Validator::make($request->all(), [
             $test->rules
        ]);
        if ($validator->fails()) {
            return view('test')->withErrors($validator)
        }
        test::create($request->all());
 }

Validation show error like this

The 0 field is required.

I want show this

The name field is required.
The title field is required.

7

I solve it

public function store(Request $request)
{
  $test=new test; /// create model object
    $validator = Validator::make($request->all(),$test->rules);
    if ($validator->fails()) {
        return view('test')->withErrors($validator)
    }
    test::create($request->all());
}
  • What if I want to make this generic (like API) so that it can be called from any view . How would I pass it to the same view (without knowing). – Veer Shrivastav May 21 '17 at 13:49
  • @VeerShrivastav maybe you can write yourself a helper class? – Hackbard Mar 9 '18 at 21:52
2

You could also look at validating in your model and throwing a ValidationException which will be handled as usual in your controller (with the error bag etc). E.g:

abstract class BaseModel extends Model implements ModelInterface {
    protected $validationRules = [];

    /**
     * Validate model against rules
     * @param array $rules optional array of validation rules. If not passed will validate against object's current values
     * @throws ValidationException if validation fails. Used for displaying errors in view
     */
    public function validate($rules=[]) {
        if (empty($rules))
            $rules = $this->toArray();

        $validator = \Validator::make($rules,$this->validationRules);
        if ($validator->fails())
            throw new ValidationException($validator);
    }

    /**
     * Attempt to validate input, if successful fill this object
     * @param array $inputArray associative array of values for this object to validate against and fill this object
     * @throws ValidationException if validation fails. Used for displaying errors in view
     */
    public function validateAndFill($inputArray) {
        // must validate input before injecting into model
        $this->validate($inputArray);
        $this->fill($inputArray);
    }
}

Then in my Controller:

public function store(Request $request) {
    $person = $this->personService->create($request->input());

    return redirect()->route('people.index', $person)->with('status', $person->first_name.' has been saved');
}

Finally in my base service class

abstract class BaseResourceService {
    protected $dataService;
    protected $modelClassName;

    /**
     * Create a resource
     * @param array $inputArray of key value pairs of this object to create
     * @returns $object
     */
    public function create($inputArray) {
        try {
            $arr = $inputArray;
            $object = new $this->modelClassName();
            $object->validateAndFill($arr);
            $this->dataService->create($object);
            return $object;
        }
        catch (Exception $exception) {
            $this->handleError($exception);
        }
    }

If the model validates it continues as usual. If there's a validation error it goes back to the previous page with the validation errors in the flash data/error bag.

I will most probably move the $person->validate() method to my service class, however it will still work as outlined above.

0

You are doing it the wrong way. The rules array should either be in your controller or better in a Form Request.

Let me show you a better approach:

Create a new Form Request file with php artisan make:request TestRequest.

Example TestRequest class:

namespace App\Http\Requests;

use App\Http\Requests\Request;

class TestRequest extends Request
{
    /**
     * Determine if the user is authorized to make this request.
     *
     * @return bool
     */
    public function authorize()
    {
        return true;
    }

    /**
     * Get the validation messages.
     *
     * @return array
     */
    public function messages()
    {
        return [
            'title.required'    => 'A title is required.',
            'name.required'    => 'The name field is required'
        ];
    }

    /**
     * Get the validation rules that apply to the request.
     *
     * @return array
     */
    public function rules()
    {
        return [
            'title' => 'required',
            'name' => 'required',
        ];
    }
}

Inject the request object into your controller method.

public function store(TestRequest $request)
{
    // You don't need any validation, this is already done
    test::create($request->all());
}
  • 9
    why is it bad to store the rules with the model? why create an extra object with the request with validation login in there? – Matt Catellier Sep 2 '16 at 17:44
  • 9
    I'm from a Ruby on Rails background and have used Laravel for a couple of years, personally, I prefer the approach to validate in the model level for two main reasons: 1. Models can be changed from many places other than user inputs, to maintain the integrity of data isn't for only frontend user but everybody, including the all the developers in the project. 2. Custom Request and Validators are only for attributes that you got from controllers, they don't validate all attributes of the model, say, what if a valid purchase of 2 items makes the inventory become -1. – Jing Oct 28 '16 at 0:06
  • I would also love to know why Laravel does it this way. While I think that this answer is good in general I marked down for saying that way is "better" - "better" is subjective – Sabrina Leggett Dec 20 '16 at 19:19
  • Here the user wanted to put the rules into model and not into controller or form request. Because, mostly, we write rules into models, as the frameworks suggested. – Niladri Banerjee - Uttarpara Feb 13 '17 at 7:56
  • According to Jeffrey Way, this is the 'preferred' method as it also allows authorisation checking. However there's no reason why the above rules method can't retrieve its rules from a static property of the model. So instead of public $rules it would become public static $rules and the above method would just return MyModel::$rules – user3791372 Jul 23 '17 at 1:10

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