68

I am developing a service and using there docker compose to spin services like postgres, redis, elasticsearch. I have a web application that is based on RubyOnRails and writes and reads from all those services.

Here is my docker-compose.yml

version: '2'

services:
  redis:
    image: redis:2.8
    networks:
      - frontapp

  elasticsearch:
    image: elasticsearch:2.2
    networks:
      - frontapp

  postgres:  
    image: postgres:9.5
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: elephant
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: smarty_pants
      POSTGRES_DB: elephant
    volumes:
      - /var/lib/postgresql/data
    networks:
      - frontapp

networks:
  frontapp:
    driver: bridge

And i can ping containers within this network

$ docker-compose run redis /bin/bash
root@777501e06c03:/data# ping postgres
PING postgres (172.20.0.2): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 172.20.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.346 ms
64 bytes from 172.20.0.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.047 ms
...

So far so good. Now I want to run ruby on rails application on my host machine but be able to access postgres instance with url like postgresql://username:password@postgres/database currently that is not possible

$ ping postgres
ping: unknown host postgres

I can see my network in docker

$ docker network ls
NETWORK ID          NAME                DRIVER
ac394b85ce09        bridge              bridge              
0189d7e86b33        elephant_default    bridge              
7e00c70bde3b        elephant_frontapp   bridge              
a648554a72fa        host                host                
4ad9f0f41b36        none                null 

And I can see an interface to it

$ ifconfig 
br-0189d7e86b33 Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 02:42:76:72:bb:c2  
          inet addr:172.18.0.1  Bcast:0.0.0.0  Mask:255.255.0.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::42:76ff:fe72:bbc2/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:36 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:60 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
          RX bytes:2000 (2.0 KB)  TX bytes:8792 (8.7 KB)

br-7e00c70bde3b Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 02:42:e7:d1:fe:29  
          inet addr:172.20.0.1  Bcast:0.0.0.0  Mask:255.255.0.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::42:e7ff:fed1:fe29/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:1584 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1597 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
          RX bytes:407137 (407.1 KB)  TX bytes:292299 (292.2 KB)
...

But i am not sure what should I do next. I tried to play a bit with /etc/resolv.conf, mainly with nameserver directive, but that had no effect.

I would appreciate any help of suggestions how to configure this setup correctly.

UPDATE

After browsing through Internet resources I managed to assign static IP addresses to boxes. For now it is enough for me to continue development. Here is my current docker-compose.yml

version: '2'

services:
  redis:
    image: redis:2.8
    networks:
      frontapp:
        ipv4_address: 172.25.0.11

  elasticsearch:
    image: elasticsearch:2.2
    networks:
      frontapp:
        ipv4_address: 172.25.0.12

  postgres:  
    image: postgres:9.5
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: elephant
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: smarty_pants
      POSTGRES_DB: elephant
    volumes:
      - /var/lib/postgresql/data
    networks:
      frontapp:
        ipv4_address: 172.25.0.10

networks:
  frontapp:
    driver: bridge
    ipam:
      driver: default
      config:
        - subnet: 172.25.0.0/16
          gateway: 172.25.0.1
44
0

There is a opensource application that solves this issue, it's called DNS Proxy Server, here some examples from official repository

It's a DNS server that solves containers hostnames, if could not found a hostname that matches then solve it from internet as well

Start DNS Server

$ docker run --hostname dns.mageddo --restart=unless-stopped -p 5380:5380 \
-v /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock \
-v /etc/resolv.conf:/etc/resolv.conf \
defreitas/dns-proxy-server

It will be set automatically as your default DNS (and recover to the original when it stops)

Creating some containers for test

checking docker-compose file

$ cat docker-compose.yml
version: '3'
services:
  nginx-1:
    image: nginx
    hostname: nginx-1.docker
    network_mode: bridge 
  linux-1:
    image: alpine
    hostname: linux-1.docker
    command: sh -c 'apk add --update bind-tools && tail -f /dev/null'
    network_mode: bridge # that way he can solve others containers names even inside, solve nginx-2, for example

starting containers

$ docker-compose up

Solving containers

from host

nslookup nginx-1.docker
Server:     13.0.0.5
Address:    13.0.0.5#53
Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   nginx-1.docker
Address: 13.0.0.6

from another container

$ docker-compose exec linux-1 ping nginx-1.docker
PING nginx-1.docker (13.0.0.6): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 13.0.0.6: seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.034 ms

As well it solves internet hostnames

$ nslookup google.com
Server:     13.0.0.5
Address:    13.0.0.5#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   google.com
Address: 216.58.202.78
| improve this answer | |
  • Looks like exactly what I was looking for back then. Once I will get to this project again I will definitely give a try to your solution! – Max Jul 26 '17 at 16:34
  • 3
    Should be noted that this solution does not work on OSX. The resolv.conf file is not used for DNS resolution unfortunately. – Xaero Degreaz Oct 15 '17 at 2:52
  • Also not an option if you have a windows user in your dev team ;) – Riscie Jun 6 '19 at 10:04
  • @Riscie Seems to support Windows: mageddo.github.io/dns-proxy-server/latest/en/1-getting-started/… – exic Aug 13 '19 at 11:45
6
0

There are two solutions (except /etc/hosts) described here and here

I wrote my own solution in Python and implemented it as service to provide mapping from container hostname to its IP. Here it is: https://github.com/nicolai-budico/dockerhosts

It launches dnsmasq with parameter --hostsdir=/var/run/docker-hosts and updates file /var/run/docker-hosts/hosts each time a list of running containers was changed. Once file /var/run/docker-hosts/hosts is changed, dnsmasq automatically updates its mapping and container become available by hostname in a second.

$ docker run -d --hostname=myapp.local.com --rm -it ubuntu:17.10
9af0b6a89feee747151007214b4e24b8ec7c9b2858badff6d584110bed45b740

$ nslookup myapp.local.com
Server:         127.0.0.53
Address:        127.0.0.53#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   myapp.local.com
Address: 172.17.0.2

There are install and uninstall scripts. Only you need is to allow your system to interact with this dnsmasq instance. I registered in in systemd-resolved:

$ cat /etc/systemd/resolved.conf

[Resolve]
DNS=127.0.0.54
#FallbackDNS=
#Domains=
#LLMNR=yes
#MulticastDNS=yes
#DNSSEC=no
#Cache=yes
#DNSStubListener=udp
| improve this answer | |
5
0

If you're only using you docker-compose setup locally you could map the ports from your containers to your host with

elasticsearch:
  image: elasticsearch:2.2
  ports:
    - 9300:9300
    - 9200:9200

Then use localhost:9300 (or 9200 depending on protocol) from your web-app to access Elasticsearch.

A more complex solution is to run your own dns that resolve container names. I think that this solution is a lot closer to what you're asking for. I have previsously used skydns when running kubernetes locally.

There are a few options out there. Have a look at https://github.com/gliderlabs/registrator and https://github.com/jderusse/docker-dns-gen. I didn't try it, but you could potentially map the dns port to your host in the same way as with the elastic ports in the previous example and then add localhost to your resolv.conf to be able to resolve your container names from your host.

| improve this answer | |
4
0

hostname of the docker container cannot be seen from outside. What you can do is to assign a name to container and access the container through the name. If you link 2 containers say container1 and container2 then docker takes care of writing the IP and the hostname of container2 in the container1. However in your case your application is running in the hostmachine.

OR

You know the IP of the container. So in your host machine's /etc/hosts you can add $IP $hostanameof container

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Aditya is correct. In your case the simplest is to hard code your hostname / IP maping in /etc/hosts

The problem with this approach, however, is that you do not control the private IP address your postgres machine will have. IP address will change every time you start a new container, and so you will need to update your /etc/hosts file.

If that's an issue, I would recommend that you read this blog post that explains how to enforce that a container get a specific IP address:

https://xand.es/2016/05/09/docker-with-known-ip/

| improve this answer | |
  • I thought of this approach but that is way to hassle to be used in long term for development. – Max May 16 '16 at 10:39
0
0

You could Dockerize the RoR app / or any other app that needs access to the containers.

I know, this is a trivial solution, but let me explain:

I wanted a similar thing, but for a different reason. I am implementing SSO via SAML and wanted to create a dev environment, where I can test the solution. Originally I wanted to run the browser on the host machine, but as I had problems with accessing arbitrary ports from the host on clients, and also the DNS based solution by deFreitas is not working on Mac, I realized, I could dockerize a browser:

docker run --rm -p 8085:8085 chadmoon/gtk3-docker

See: https://github.com/moondev/gtk3-docker for details.

| improve this answer | |

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