If I have this:

class Human {
    constructor(){

    }
}

class Person extends Human {
    constructor(){
        super();
    }
}

Is it possible to know if the Human's constructor was called via the Person class? I thought about arguments.callee but that is deprecated.

  • Why would you need to know that? – Felix Kling May 15 '16 at 18:55
  • @FelixKling when you ask I get kind of embarassed :) But I had a sequence of classes extended and needed to set a property in a parent/super class because it was calling a method that needed it. Bad code design. But while I was fixing it the question came to me. – Rikard May 15 '16 at 18:58
  • 2
    You really should fix your design so that Human does not need to know what is is being subclassed by. The fact that you think you need to know that means the design is flawed. – jfriend00 May 15 '16 at 18:58
  • @jfriend00 agree, that is what I did. But before I started fixing it the question came up and I could not answer it or find the answer myself. – Rikard May 15 '16 at 18:59
  • 2
    It's not worth answering because you should NEVER do it and people here should NOT recommend doing it. – jfriend00 May 15 '16 at 19:45
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's easy (but ill-advised) to check whether the instance is of a particular subclasss:

class Human {
    constructor(){
        console.log(this instanceof Person);
    }
}

To check whether it's an instance of the base class (and not a subclass) you can use:

Object.getPrototypeOf(this) === Human.prototype

[ so long as you haven't messed with the class and overwritten the prototype object ]

You can also check the value of this.constructor.name - it'll reflect the type of the initial constructor called, and doesn't change when the base class constructor is called, although this could fail if the code is minified.

  • 1
    Good ideas, maybe this.constructor.name could be a idea also? es6fiddle.net/io8yos23 – Rikard May 15 '16 at 19:14
  • 1
    @Rikard yes, that appears to work too – Alnitak May 15 '16 at 19:14
  • 1
    @Rikard this.constructor.name is not compatible with minification. – estus May 15 '16 at 19:23
  • 1
    @estus good point! – Alnitak May 15 '16 at 19:24
  • 3
    This is just BAD object oriented design and should never be recommended. A superclass should never have to know about a specific sub-class. If you think it does, then the design needs to be fixed/reworked so that is not the case. There is always a way to do proper design without a super class knowing about a subclass. You may need to create virtual methods that a subclass overrides, but the superclass should never be coded with any specific knowledge of subclasses. – jfriend00 May 15 '16 at 19:43

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