66

I just started learning Go and I got confused with one example about using defer to change named return value in the The Go Blog - Defer, Panic, and Recover.

The example says:

  1. Deferred functions may read and assign to the returning function's named return values.

In this example, a deferred function increments the return value i after the surrounding function returns. Thus, this function returns 2:

func c() (i int) {
    defer func() { i++ }()
    return 1
}

But as what I have learned from A Tour of Go - Named return values

A return statement without arguments returns the named return values. This is known as a "naked" return.

I tested in the following code and in function b it returns 1 because it wasn't the "A return statement without arguments" case mentioned above.

func a() (i int) { // return 2
    i = 2
    return
}

func b() (i int) {  // return 1 
    i = 2
    return 1
}

So my question is in the first example, the surrounding function c has a named return value i, but the function c uses return 1 which in the second example we can see it should have return 1 no matter what value i is. But why after i changes in the deferred function the c function returns the value of i instead the value 1?

As I was typing my question, I might have guessed the answer. Is it because:

return 1 

is equals to:

i = 1
return 

in a function with a named return value variable i?

Please help me confirm, thanks!

4 Answers 4

63

A defer statement pushes a function call onto a list. The list of saved calls is executed after the surrounding function returns. -- The Go Blog: Defer, Panic, and Recover

Another way to understand the above statement:

A defer statements pushes a function call onto a stack. The stack of saved calls popped out (LIFO) and deferred functions are invoked immediately before the surrounding function returns.

 func c() (i int) {
    defer func() { i++ }()
    return 1
}

After 1 is returned, the defer func() { i++ }() gets executed. Hence, in order of executions:

  1. i = 1 (return 1)
  2. i++ (defer func pop out from stack and executed)
  3. i == 2 (final result of named variable i)

For understanding sake:

 func c() (i int) {
    defer func() { fmt.Println("third") }()
    defer func() { fmt.Println("second") }()
    defer func() { fmt.Println("first") }()

    return 1
}

Order of executions:

  1. i = 1 (return 1)
  2. "first"
  3. "second"
  4. "third"
5
  • 2
    Thanks, i understand the LIFO thing about defer, actually i was having difficulty understand the named return value. now i'm clear!
    – Hammer
    May 16, 2016 at 8:00
  • 15
    "executer after the function returns" is incorrect. The specs quite clearly state that "deferred functions are invoked immediately before the surrounding function returns", not after. If defers were invoked after the return, they wouldn't be able to change the return value in the case of func c. The order of execution should then be: i = 1 (assign) i++ (defer increment) return return 2 Apr 28, 2017 at 14:53
  • 1
    @EliasVanOotegem Fixed! :)
    – Roy Lee
    Aug 29, 2018 at 10:29
  • This is one of the interesting go "gotcha" that flew in my face. Apr 18, 2019 at 23:24
  • 1
    The OP was asking about the reason why returned value was 2, which i was confused while reading the docs too. The LIFO nature of defer is pretty clear already. I guess it would be great if your answer focus more to address the returned value. Thanks. What a nice feature from Go.
    – Long
    Jul 21, 2021 at 16:55
12

According to the Go Specification:

Return Statements A "return" statement that specifies results sets the result parameters before any deferred functions are executed.

Defer Statements "...deferred functions are invoked immediately before the surrounding function returns..."

So yes, as you assumed, the named return variable is assigned, then the deferred statement increments it.

I would add that named return parameters can lead to subtle bugs, and generally should be avoided unless there's no alternative.

7

I think the confusion is about function in function how about if you classified like this:

  func main() {
      fmt.Println(c()) //the result is 5
  }

  // the c function returned value is named j
  func c() (j int)  {
      defer changei(&j)
      return 6
  }
  func changei(j *int) {
      //now j is 6 because it was assigned by return statement 
      // and if i change guess what?! i changed the returned value
      *j--;
  }

but if the return value is not named like this:

  func main() {
      fmt.Println(c()) //the result will become 6
  }

  // the c function returned value is not named at this time
  func c() int  {
      j := 1
      defer changei(&j)
      return 6
  }
  func changei(j *int) {
      //now j = 1
      // and if i change guess what?! it will not effects the returned value
      *j--;
  }

I hope this will clear the confusion and that is how i did happy Go coding

1
0

Maybe this named return value function

func c() (i int) {
  defer func() { i++ }()
  return 1
}

will be compiled like this:

func c() int {
  defer func() { i++ }()
  i = 1
  return i
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.