10

In my last c# interview,
I was asked to prove immutability of C# string,I know what is meant by immutability of c# string,But is it possible to prove immutability of c# string through code ? can i have a sample code snippet please. Thanks in advance

  • 1
    Check the object references of both the string objects, they would be same. – Marshal May 16 '16 at 11:54
  • 2
    Write a loop that concatenate strings then watch the GC go mad and your application burn through memory like crazy? – Nasreddine May 16 '16 at 11:54
  • 5
    You cannot - in fact you can indeed prove that you can mutate a string using unsafe code. The best you can do is point to the specification that promises that strings are immutable (in the context of CLR safe code). If your job is programming, you have to get used to trusting the language spec - if the language doesn't do what the spec says, it's a bug for the compiler team to fix. You can demonstrate an example where the string is not mutated, but it doesn't prove anything. There may be constructs where this fails. Until you find one, you have to simply trust the spec. – J... May 16 '16 at 11:57
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    Probably they just wanted to listen how you would approach the problem, your thoughts, discussions and so on. Not really expecting you to prove strings are immutable. Otherwise it was just not very good interview question :) – Evk May 16 '16 at 12:00
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    @M.kazemAkhgary Yes, but this can be done within the confines of C# itself. It's not like we're using a debugger or disassembler or code injection or anything else - just perfectly valid C# code. If the interviewers wanted a more specific answer they should ask a more coherent and specific question. – J... May 16 '16 at 12:20
8

I can prove that a string is not immutable. All I need to do is to show some code which mutates a string, like so:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace Demo
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const string test = "ABCDEF"; // Strings are immutable, right?
            char[] chars = new StringToChar {str = test}.chr;
            chars[0] = 'X';

            // On an x32 release or debug build or on an x64 debug build, 
            // the following prints "XBCDEF".
            // On an x64 release build, it prints "ABXDEF".
            // In both cases, we have changed the contents of 'test' without using
            // any 'unsafe' code...

            Console.WriteLine(test);

            // The following line is even more disturbing, since the constant
            // string "ABCDEF" has been mutated too (because the interned 'constant' string was mutated).

            Console.WriteLine("ABCDEF");
        }
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    public struct StringToChar
    {
        [FieldOffset(0)] public string str;
        [FieldOffset(0)] public char[] chr;
    }
}

Now whether this should be considered a bug in C# is a different matter. :) (The answer is probably that FieldOffset should be considered to be unsafe - the code above is purportedly safe and therefore the string should not be mutatable.)

Also, I think you could legitimately argue that string is immutable in spirit, even if there are silly edge cases which violate its immutability in supposedly safe code.

  • 2
    @samurai I think you may need to consider the logic of the situation more carefully. A string cannot be both immutable and mutable at the same time. Since the former is a proof of a negative, the latter immediately invalidates any supposed proof thereof. The answer to the question of "How can you prove c# strings are immutable" is that you cannot because they are not immutable. Just because they are not mutated in some cases does not prove that they cannot be mutated. – J... May 16 '16 at 12:30
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    @samurai Simple logic, if you can directly prove that string is mutable by showing a case where it can be mutated, it means that it cannot be immutable. – Matthew Watson May 16 '16 at 12:33
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    @Sylverac Also try the code with my latest edit where I added Console.WriteLine("ABCDEF"); - which doesn't even print "ABCDEF" any more! – Matthew Watson May 16 '16 at 13:42
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    @Sylverac No, it's not the same at all. The compiler isn't creating the new strings directly itself when you concatenate them - it's the implementation of the concatenation methods inside String that does that (have a look at the implementation in the ReferenceSource). These create and return references to new strings. Also note that a str += "XXX" string concatenation gets turned into a call to str = string.Concat(str, "XXX"). New strings are created for +=, but my code does NOT create them. – Matthew Watson May 16 '16 at 14:30
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    @Sylverac What happens is: Firstly an instance of the StringToChar struct is created, with a reference to the string test assigned to the struct's str field (note: A reference is assigned, not a copy of the string). Then the chr field in the struct is used to access the contents of the string as if it was an array of chars (i.e. providing direct access to the string contents). It does this by using FieldOffset(0) to make the struct act like a C++ union. Finally the code changes the first element of the char array (which changes the underlying string). – Matthew Watson May 16 '16 at 14:58
1

Yes, It is possible to prove immutability of c# string using ObjectIDGenerator Class.

Following answer is taken from dotmob article on String Vs Stringbuilder in C#

Actually ObjectIDGenerator will return an unique integer value for instances that we created in our programs.With the help of this class we can check whether new instance is created or not for various operations on string and stringbuilder .Consider following program

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    ObjectIDGenerator idGenerator = new ObjectIDGenerator();
    bool blStatus = new bool();
    //just ignore this blStatus Now.
    String str = "My first string was ";
    Console.WriteLine("str = {0}", str);
    Console.WriteLine("Instance Id : {0}", idGenerator.GetId(str, out blStatus));
    //here blStatus get True for new instace otherwise it will be false
    Console.WriteLine("this instance is new : {0}\n", blStatus);
    str += "Hello World";
    Console.WriteLine("str = {0}", str);
    Console.WriteLine("Instance Id : {0}", idGenerator.GetId(str, out blStatus));
    Console.WriteLine("this instance is new : {0}\n", blStatus);
    //Now str="My first string was Hello World"
    StringBuilder sbr = new StringBuilder("My Favourate Programming Font is ");
    Console.WriteLine("sbr = {0}", sbr);
    Console.WriteLine("Instance Id : {0}", idGenerator.GetId(sbr, out blStatus));
    Console.WriteLine("this instance is new : {0}\n", blStatus);
    sbr.Append("Inconsolata");
    Console.WriteLine("sbr = {0}", sbr);
    Console.WriteLine("Instance Id : {0}", idGenerator.GetId(sbr, out blStatus));
    Console.WriteLine("this instance is new : {0}\n", blStatus);
    //Now sbr="My Favourate Programming Font is Inconsolata"
    Console.ReadKey();
  }
}

Output Will look like this enter image description here

Instance id for string get changed from 1 to 2 when str concatenated with “Hello World”.while instance id of sbr remains same as 3 after append operation also. This tells all about mutability and immutability. blStatus variable indicate whether the instance is new or not.

You can find complete article on the topic from : http://dotnetmob.com/csharp-article/difference-string-stringbuilder-c/

  • 1
    let me check it first, if it is correct i will accept your answer – BinaryOf Sam May 16 '16 at 12:03
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    This only proves that the operators and methods you are testing create new string instances. It does not prove that strings are always immutable. See J's comment below the question why it's not possible to prove in a mathematical/scientific meaning of prove. – René Vogt May 16 '16 at 12:08
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    thanks for the article – samurai May 16 '16 at 12:22
  • ‒1 for the verifably false statement It is possible to prove immutability of c# string, will switch to upvote if you edit your answer to remove this assertion and incorporate information provided by @RenéVogt – Chris Marisic May 1 '17 at 22:11
-2

A simple example:

string str = "test";string str2 = str;Console.WriteLine(str2);

//output: test

str = "DDD";Console.WriteLine(str2);

//output: test

Try this code, if string is mutable, "str2" should be "DDD".

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