This is maybe a basic question, but I cannot see the response by myself right now.

Consider the following code:

template<bool b>
struct T {
    static constexpr int value = (b ? 42 : 0);
};

template<bool b>
struct U {
    enum { value = (b ? 42 : 0) };
};

int main() {
    static_assert(T<true>::value == 42, "!");
    static_assert(T<false>::value == 0, "!");
    static_assert(U<true>::value == 42, "!");
    static_assert(U<false>::value == 0, "!");
}

I'm used to using structs like T, but more than once I've seen structs like U used for the same purpose (mostly traits definition).

As far as I can see, they are both resolved at compile time and they solve almost the same problem, but it seems to me that T is far more readable than U (well, I know, my personal opinion).

My question is pretty simple: is there any technical reason for which one solution is better than the other one?
Even more, is there any case for which one of them is not a viable solution?

  • 1
    If you were using something other than integrals then you'd HAVE to use constexpr. – Crazy Eddie May 16 '16 at 17:48
  • @CrazyEddie This is quite obvious!! The example is not there for a mistake. :-) – skypjack May 16 '16 at 18:17
  • 1
    I'd like to know the reasons of the downvoters and the ones that voted to close the question as primarily opinion-based, with such a technical answer posted by @SergeyA (as correctly pointed out in the question for its technical parts, indeed). Quite funny. – skypjack May 16 '16 at 19:18
up vote 23 down vote accepted

There will be no noticeable difference for integral constants when used like this.

However, enum is actually better, because it is a true named constant. constexpr integral constant is an object which can be, for example, ODR-used - and that would result in linking errors.

#include <iostream>

struct T {
    static constexpr int i = 42;
    enum : int {x = 42};
};

void check(const int& z) {
    std::cout << "Check: " << z << "\n";
}

int main() {
    // check(T::i); // Uncommenting this will lead to link error
    check(T::x);
}

When check(T::i) is uncommented, the program can not be linked:

/tmp/ccZoETx7.o: In function `main': ccc.cpp:(.text+0x45): undefined reference to `T::i' collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

However, the true enum always works.

  • 1
    You can work around the issue by instantiating i in a cpp file, but then that allows you to take the address of &. Taking the address of a value is nonsensical. Enums don't allow this. – Mooing Duck May 16 '16 at 20:19
  • 1
    @BenCollins You can see 3.2p3 or any other site like this one. – skypjack May 18 '16 at 5:49
  • 1
    @skypjack, you can. – ixSci May 18 '16 at 6:26
  • 1
    @gnzlbg inline variable? Never heard about them. Have you a link? Thanks. – skypjack May 18 '16 at 9:50
  • 2
    @skypjack N4424 – Barry May 18 '16 at 14:29

I suspect it's legacy code.

enum { value = (b ? 42 : 0) };

is valid code in C++03 as well as C++11.

static constexpr int value = (b ? 42 : 0);

is valid only in C++11.

Even more, is there any case for which one of them is not a viable solution?

Both are viable solutions in C++11. The choice of which one to use depends on a team. It's going to be a matter of a policy decision.

As the answer by SergeyA indicates, enum are true constants. You cannot ODR-use them. You can ODR-use a constexpr. Depending on which of these is desirable for your application, you can decide whether to use enums or constexprs.

  • It makes sense and I suspect almost the same. I've asked on SO in regard of obscure technical reasons for I'm not sure about that, that's all. :-) – skypjack May 16 '16 at 17:38
  • 1
    @skypjack let's hope someone has more insight. – R Sahu May 16 '16 at 17:41
  • There is a benefit in using enum, see my answer. – SergeyA May 16 '16 at 17:41
  • @SergeyA, thanks for the additional info. – R Sahu May 16 '16 at 17:47
  • @RSahu, I doubt there is a case when someone wants to ODR-use a constexpr. This is usually undesired. – SergeyA May 16 '16 at 17:53

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