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I am developing a C# library where the user needs to write his/her own classes inheriting from given classes from the library. I don't think writing further details will be helpful, so please even if what I am asking for looks strange, consider it as such.

In one class, I would like the following behavior: two mutually exclusive "abstract" methods such that if one is implemented then there is no need to implement the other (so right, they are not really abstract).

I need to force the user to implement at least one of these methods, so declaring both methods virtual only is not enough. Actually I could declare both abstract, but it means the user should implement a method that would never be called afterwards and of course I want to avoid that.

Is there a trick or a C# idiom to do something close to what I want? Maybe with some reflection tricks I know almost nothing about?

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    Simple answer: no. – Jamiec May 17 '16 at 16:08
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    May be just have two classes for your client? And let him choose appropriate one? – Giorgi Nakeuri May 17 '16 at 16:09
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    If it feels like you're torturing C#, then that's a strong indicator that you need to re-think your design. Look at it from another angle and redefine your approach. Giorgi's comment is appropriate. – rory.ap May 17 '16 at 16:11
  • @GiorgiNakeuri Aaah, why not. I will consider this, thanks! – Florian Richoux May 17 '16 at 16:13
  • @roryap You absolutely right and actually I share the same feeling. I am twisting this for performance purpose (performances are REALLY important for that lib), but maybe I should consider dropping it... – Florian Richoux May 17 '16 at 16:15
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I think what you're trying to do is violating a lot of Object-Oriented design goals.

"I need to force the user to implement at least one of these methods"

If the two classes need to have functionality that is is one thing or the other, why not just have 1 abstract method (or create an interface), and have the two classes override that method differently? Then you force each class to implement one part of the functionality and the other implement the other type.

I would recommend re-thinking your approach rather than spending tons of time trying to make a poor approach work.

EDIT: Based on your comments I'll try to go into a bit more detail.

You could try something like the following. But I suspect you'll need to expand it significantly to get it working. But this should get you started anyway

public class ResultFromMethod1 {
    public bool optimized = false;
    // other results here
}

This stores the results from method 1 and tells you how method 1 was run.

public interface IInterfaceForMethod1 {
    ResultFromMethod1 Method1 ();
}

public interface IInterfaceForMethod2 {
    void Method2 (ResultFromMethod1 resultFromMethod1, Vector v);
}

These are the interfaces for the two methods. Note that they are not implemented yet. This is just a contract for classes that implement them.

public class UnoptomizedImplementation : IInterfaceForMethod1, IInterfaceForMethod2 {
    #region IInterfaceForMethod1 implementation
    public ResultFromMethod1 Method1 () {
        ResultFromMethod1 resultFromMethod1 = new ResultFromMethod1 ();
        resultFromMethod1.optimized = false;
        // Method1 logic here
        return resultFromMethod1;
    }
    #endregion

    #region IInterfaceForMethod2 implementation
    public void Method2 (ResultFromMethod1 resultFromMethod1, Vector v) {
        if (!ResultFromMethod1.optimized) {
            //if NOT optimized
            //logic here
        }
        else {
            //throw exception
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

These class runs method1 not optimized, and then has a method2 that requires method 1 be not optimized. If you don't need method2 when it's not optimized then just don't implement the method2 interface.

public  class OptimizedImplementation : IInterfaceForMethod1, IInterfaceForMethod2 {
    #region IInterfaceForMethod1 implementation
    public ResultFromMethod1 Method1 () {
        ResultFromMethod1 resultFromMethod1 = new ResultFromMethod1 ();
        resultFromMethod1.optimized = true;
        // Method2 logic here
        return resultFromMethod1;
    }
    #endregion

    #region IInterfaceForMethod2 implementation
    public void Method2 (ResultFromMethod1 resultFromMethod1, Vector v) {
        if (ResultFromMethod1.optimized) {
            //if optimized
            //logic here
        }
        else {
            //throw exception
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

This class requires an output from method1 that is optimized or it throws an exception.

I hope that sends you down a more manageable track.

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  • Yes, I agree something is wrong. I won't detail why I want such two methods, but in a nutshell, let's say one method A should be normal and the other, B, an optimized one (and B cannot use A). However I think I will drop this overcomplicated idea and stick with something simpler (even if it will certainly be a bit less efficient). – Florian Richoux May 17 '16 at 16:33
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    But the method could just be implemented as optimized. If you want to differentiate optimized methods from non, perhaps you could make a different interface that is something like IOptimizedInterface with similar functionality. However this new optimized interface has methods that output instances of a special class that you've created to ensure optimization. this way the user can decide to implement the normal interface or the optimized interface, and the methods would ensure that optimized classes are returned. – Adam B May 17 '16 at 16:55
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I suggest implementing interfaces

  public interface IMyMethod1 {
    void MyMethod1();
  }

  public interface IMyMethod2 {
    void MyMethod2();
  }

and inject a dependency

  public class MyClass {
    ... 
    public MyClass(IMyMethod1 method1, IMyMethod2 method2) {
      if ((null == method1) && (null == method2))
        throw new ArgumentNullException("method1", 
          "You should provide either method1 or method2");

      m_Method1 = method1;
      m_Method2 = method2;
    }

    ...

    public void DoSomething() {
      ... 
      if (m_Method1 != null)
        m_Method1.MyMethod1(); 
      else if (m_Method2 != null)
        m_Method2.MyMethod2(); 
      ...
    }
  }
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  • You have some original style for checking for nulls :) – Giorgi Nakeuri May 17 '16 at 16:16
  • @Giorgi Nakeuri: null == something style turned into (bad) habbit and often I've put null != something as well :) – Dmitry Bychenko May 17 '16 at 16:19
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    @GiorgiNakeuri - Actually, that style is descended from the original C language. You see, in C, you could accidentally write something like method1 = null and it would compile, although the results would not be what you expect (it would assign null to method1 instead of comparing). So programmers from C would reverse the condition because writing null = method1 would flag a compile error because you can't assign a value to null. – Icemanind May 17 '16 at 16:22
  • Now serious comment: I don't really think you are injecting something here. Yes you are injecting method1 and method2 separately but that makes no sense to me. Why not to have 1 interface? – Giorgi Nakeuri May 17 '16 at 16:27
  • @Icemanind, hhm interesting. Thank you for the explanations. makes sense. – Giorgi Nakeuri May 17 '16 at 16:29
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To avoid reflection, create you base class (abstract) without either of those two methods. Then, create separate classes (abstract) inheriting your base class for both of the "special" methods.

This will require some type-checking and casting, but it's all I got right now.

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