128

I can't figure out how to set default property values for my components using Typescript.

This is the source code:

class PageState
{
}

export class PageProps
{
    foo: string = "bar";
}

export class PageComponent extends React.Component<PageProps, PageState>
{
    public render(): JSX.Element
    {
        return (
            <span>Hello, world</span>
        );
    }
}

And when I try to use the component like this:

ReactDOM.render(<PageComponent />, document.getElementById("page"));

I get an error saying property foo is missing. I want to use the default value. I've also tried to use static defaultProps = ... inside the component, but it had no effect as I suspected.

src/typescript/main.tsx(8,17): error TS2324: Property 'foo' is missing in type 'IntrinsicAttributes & IntrinsicClassAttributes<PageComponent> & PageProps & { children?: ReactEle...'.

How can I use default property values? Many JS components my company uses rely on them and not using them is not a choice.

  • static defaultProps is correct. Can you post that code? – Aaron Beall May 17 '16 at 16:56
276

Default props with class component

Using static defaultProps is correct. You should also be using interfaces, not classes, for the props and state.

Update 2018/12/1: TypeScript has improved the type-checking related to defaultProps over time. Read on for latest and greatest usage down to older usages and issues.

For TypeScript 3.0 and up

TypeScript specifically added support for defaultProps to make type-checking work how you'd expect. Example:

interface PageProps {
  foo: string;
  bar: string;
}

export class PageComponent extends React.Component<PageProps, {}> {
    public static defaultProps = {
        foo: "default"
    };

    public render(): JSX.Element {
        return (
            <span>Hello, { this.props.foo.toUpperCase() }</span>
        );
    }
}

Which can be rendered and compile without passing a foo attribute:

<PageComponent bar={ "hello" } />

Note that:

  • foo is not marked optional (ie foo?: string) even though it's not required as a JSX attribute. Marking as optional would mean that it could be undefined, but in fact it never will be undefined because defaultProps provides a default value. Think of it similar to how you can mark a function parameter optional, or with a default value, but not both, yet both mean the call doesn't need to specify a value. TypeScript 3.0+ treats defaultProps in a similar way, which is really cool for React users!
  • The defaultProps has no explicit type annotation. Its type is inferred and used by the compiler to determine which JSX attributes are required. You could use defaultProps: Pick<PageProps, "foo"> to ensure defaultProps matches a sub-set of PageProps. More on this caveat is explained here.
  • This requires @types/react version 16.4.11 to work properly.

For TypeScript 2.1 until 3.0

Before TypeScript 3.0 implemented compiler support for defaultProps you could still make use of it, and it worked 100% with React at runtime, but since TypeScript only considered props when checking for JSX attributes you'd have to mark props that have defaults as optional with ?. Example:

interface PageProps {
    foo?: string;
    bar: number;
}

export class PageComponent extends React.Component<PageProps, {}> {
    public static defaultProps: Partial<PageProps> = {
        foo: "default"
    };

    public render(): JSX.Element {
        return (
            <span>Hello, world</span>
        );
    }
}

Note that:

  • It's a good idea to annotate defaultProps with Partial<> so that it type-checks against your props, but you don't have to supply every required property with a default value, which makes no sense since required properties should never need a default.
  • When using strictNullChecks the value of this.props.foo will be possibly undefined and require a non-null assertion (ie this.props.foo!) or type-guard (ie if (this.props.foo) ...) to remove undefined. This is annoying since the default prop value means it actually will never be undefined, but TS didn't understand this flow. That's one of the main reasons TS 3.0 added explicit support for defaultProps.

Before TypeScript 2.1

This works the same but you don't have Partial types, so just omit Partial<> and either supply default values for all required props (even though those defaults will never be used) or omit the explicit type annotation completely.

Default props with Functional Components

You can use defaultProps on function components as well, but you have to type your function to the FunctionComponent (StatelessComponent in @types/react before version 16.7.2) interface so that TypeScript knows about defaultProps on the function:

interface PageProps {
  foo?: string;
  bar: number;
}

const PageComponent: FunctionComponent<PageProps> = (props) => {
  return (
    <span>Hello, {props.foo}, {props.bar}</span>
  );
};

PageComponent.defaultProps = {
  foo: "default"
};

Note that you don't have to use Partial<PageProps> anywhere because FunctionComponent.defaultProps is already specified as a partial in TS 2.1+.

Another nice alternative (this is what I use) is to destructure your props parameters and assign default values directly:

const PageComponent: FunctionComponent<PageProps> = ({foo = "default", bar}) => {
  return (
    <span>Hello, {foo}, {bar}</span>
  );
};

Then you don't need the defaultProps at all! Be aware that if you do provide defaultProps on a function component it will take precedence over default parameter values, because React will always explicitly pass the defaultProps values (so the parameters are never undefined, thus the default parameter is never used.) So you'd use one or the other, not both.

  • 2
    The error sounds like you are using <PageComponent> somewhere without passing the foo prop. You can make it optional using foo?: string in your interface. – Aaron Beall May 17 '16 at 17:02
  • 1
    @Aaron But tsc will throw compilation error then, as defaultProps does not implement PageProps interface. You either have to make all interface properties optional (bad) or specify default value also for all required fields (unnecessary boilerplate) or avoid specifying type on defaultProps. – pamelus Aug 15 '16 at 17:12
  • 1
    @adrianmoisa You mean default props? Yes it works but the syntax is different... I'll add an example to my answer when I'm back at my computer... – Aaron Beall Mar 19 '17 at 15:26
  • 1
    @AdrianMoisa Updated with s function component example – Aaron Beall Mar 20 '17 at 15:15
  • 1
    @Jared Yes, it needs to to be public static defaultProps or static defaultProps (public is default) for everything (compiler and React runtime) to work properly. It may work at runtime with private static defaultProps only because private and public don't exist at runtime, but the compiler wouldn't work correctly. – Aaron Beall Nov 12 '18 at 14:42
17

With Typescript 2.1+, use Partial < T > instead of making your interface properties optional.

export interface Props {
    obj: Model,
    a: boolean
    b: boolean
}

public static defaultProps: Partial<Props> = {
    a: true
};
5

With Typescript 3.0 there is a new solution to this issue:

export interface Props {
    name: string;
}

export class Greet extends React.Component<Props> {
    render() {
        const { name } = this.props;
        return <div>Hello ${name.toUpperCase()}!</div>;
    }
    static defaultProps = { name: "world"};
}

// Type-checks! No type assertions needed!
let el = <Greet />

Note that for this to work you need a newer version of @types/react than 16.4.6. It works with 16.4.11.

  • Great answer! How might one handle: export interface Props { name?: string;} where name is an optional prop? I keep getting TS2532 Object is possibly 'undefined' – Fydo Sep 11 '18 at 18:13
  • @Fydo I haven't needed to have a default value for an optional prop, since undefined is a sort of automatic default value for those props. You want to be able to pass in undefined as the explicit value sometimes, but have another default value? Have you tried export interface Props {name: string | undefined;} instead? Haven't tried that, just an idea. – CorayThan Sep 11 '18 at 20:24
  • Adding ? is the same as adding |undefined. I want to optionally pass in the prop, and let defaultProps handle that case. Looks like this isn't possible in TS3 quite yet. I'll just use the dreaded name! syntax since I know it's never undefined when defaultProps are set. Thanks anyways! – Fydo Sep 12 '18 at 14:56
  • 1
    Upvoted because this is the right answer now! Also updated my accepted answer (which is starting to become a history book) with this new feature, and a little more explanation. :) – Aaron Beall Dec 3 '18 at 19:41
4

For those having optional props that need default values. Credit here :)

interface Props {
  firstName: string;
  lastName?: string;
}

interface DefaultProps {
  lastName: string;
}

type PropsWithDefaults = Props & DefaultProps;

export class User extends React.Component<Props> {
  public static defaultProps: DefaultProps = {
    lastName: 'None',
  }

  public render () {
    const { firstName, lastName } = this.props as PropsWithDefaults;

    return (
      <div>{firstName} {lastName}</div>
    )
  }
}
3

From a comment by @pamelus on the accepted answer:

You either have to make all interface properties optional (bad) or specify default value also for all required fields (unnecessary boilerplate) or avoid specifying type on defaultProps.

Actually you can use Typescript's interface inheritance. The resulting code is only a little bit more verbose.

interface OptionalGoogleAdsProps {
    format?: string;
    className?: string;
    style?: any;
    scriptSrc?: string
}

interface GoogleAdsProps extends OptionalGoogleAdsProps {
    client: string;
    slot: string;
}


/**
 * Inspired by https://github.com/wonism/react-google-ads/blob/master/src/google-ads.js
 */
export default class GoogleAds extends React.Component<GoogleAdsProps, void> {
    public static defaultProps: OptionalGoogleAdsProps = {
        format: "auto",
        style: { display: 'block' },
        scriptSrc: "//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"
    };

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