9

The expression 6 // 4 yields 1, where floor division produces the whole number after dividing a number.

But with a negative number, why does -6 // 4 return -2?

5
  • 2
    Because that is floor division. -2 < -6/4 < -1 – miradulo May 17 '16 at 18:32
  • 1
    Pretty weird question, you give the answer yourself – nicomp May 17 '16 at 18:32
  • 2
    Because the result of the division is always floored. Flooring goes down, not up. – Martijn Pieters May 17 '16 at 18:34
  • -6/4 = -1.5 round that down and you have -2 – Keiwan May 17 '16 at 18:35
  • Hence floor, not ceiling – zondo May 17 '16 at 18:35
20

The // operator explicitly floors the result. Quoting the Binary arithmetic operations documentation:

the result is that of mathematical division with the ‘floor’ function applied to the result.

Flooring is not the same thing as rounding to 0; flooring always moves to the lower integer value. See the math.floor() function:

Return the floor of x, the largest integer less than or equal to x.

For -6 // 4, first the result of -6 / 4 is calculated, so -1.5. Flooring then moves to the lower integer value, so -2.

If you want to round towards zero instead, you'll have to do so explicitly; you could do this with the int() function on true division:

>>> int(-6 / 4)
-1

int() removes the decimal portion, so always rounds towards zero instead.

3

Floor division will also round down to the next lowest number, not the next lowest absolute value.

6 // 4 = 1.5, which rounds down to 1, and up to 2.

-6 // 4 = -1.5, which rounds down to -2, and up to -1.

0
0

// in Python is a "floor division" operator. That means that the result of such division is the floor of the result of regular division (performed with / operator).

The floor of the given number is the biggest integer smaller than the this number. For example

7 / 2 = 3.5 so 7 // 2 = floor of 3.5 = 3.

For negative numbers it is less intuitive: -7 / 2 = -3.5, so -7 // 2 = floor of -3.5 = -4. Similarly -1 // 10 = floor of -0.1 = -1.

// is defined to do the same thing as math.floor(): return the largest integer value less than or equal to the floating-point result. Zero is not less than or equal to -0.1.

0

A useful way to understand why floor division // yields the results it does for negative values is see this as complimenting the modulo, or remainder, % operator.

5/3  is equivalent to 1 remainder 2 

i.e.

5//3 = 1
5%3 = 2

But

-5/3 = -2
-5%3 = 1

Or

-2 + 1/3rd which is -1.6667 (ish)

It can seem strange, but it ensures results such as -2,-2,-2,-1,-1,-1,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3 etc. when generating sequences.

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