I came across a problem I wasn't able to find a solution for.

I often make use of a mapping where the key and value are objects with matching generictypes. For each pair the generics should match. Though the generictypes between entries may varry. (Ill include an example for clarity). This can easily be accomplished with the use of the wildCard. although because of this, you cannot use the key or value in combination with eachother.

Consider the example included at the bottom. there is no (easy) way to modify the map to run into Cast exceptions. Though I still won't be able to use the map like I tried within useEntries(). So my question is, is there a workaround for this? Thanks in advance!

public class GenericWildcardTest
{   
    static Map<GenericObject<?>, Function<?, ?>> map = new HashMap<>();

    public static <S> void put(GenericObject<S> genericObject, Function<S, S> function)
    {
        map.put(genericObject, function);
    }

    public static void useEntries()
    {
        for(Entry<GenericObject<?>, Function<?, ?>> currentEntry : map.entrySet())
            //The #apply(); part simply wont compile because of cast errors.
            currentEntry.getKey().set(currentEntry.getValue().apply(currentEntry.getKey().get()));
    }



    // Simple Object with generic.
    static class GenericObject<T>
    {
        private T object;

        public GenericObject(T object)
        {
            this.object = object;
        }

        public void set(T object)
        {
            this.object = object;
        }

        public T get()
        {
            return this.object;
        }
    }
}
  • Casting is an obvious workaround. – shmosel May 17 '16 at 19:35
  • I am confused by your post and what your asking. You are using Generics and Wild Cards. I recommend going through this tutorial completely it covers Generics and Wildcards and will shed light on your issues. The Java™ Tutorials: Generics (Updated) – Mr00Anderson May 17 '16 at 19:37
  • @shmosel you propably didnt try to cast this at all? since it wont work. I even tried to make a private method with its own generic implementation. but its rather simple. a generictype can be casted to a wildcard but not vicaversa – n247s May 17 '16 at 19:42
  • I think you mean apply(currentEntry.getKey().get()). Otherwise it would need to be Function<GenericObject<S>, S>. – shmosel May 17 '16 at 19:44
  • currentEntry.getKey() returns a GenericObject<?> which means the compiler has absolutely no idea what the ? is. To guarantee you're not doing it wrong it only allows you to set what it knows is legal, and that is exactly nothing. Or can you infer what equal or a subtype of ? are without knowing what ? is? Why is your map not a (non-static) HashMap<GenericObject<S>, ...> within a class that itself is typed as <S>? That would work. – zapl May 17 '16 at 19:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's how you can do it with casting:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <S> void useEntries() {
    for(Entry<GenericObject<?>, Function<?, ?>> currentEntry : map.entrySet()) {
        GenericObject<S> key = (GenericObject<S>)currentEntry.getKey();
        Function<S, S> value = (Function<S, S>)currentEntry.getValue();
        key.set(value.apply(key.get()));
    }
}

This answer assumes that your map indeed contains Function<S, S>, not Function<GenericObject<S>, S>.

  • I prefer to put the suppression on each of the casts individually (e.g. @SuppressWarnings(...) GenericObject<T> key = ...) rather than on the whole method, so that you don't accidentally add more unchecked casts if you later change the method. But generally, this is a much better approach than raw types. – Andy Turner May 17 '16 at 19:48
  • 1
    @AndyTurner, agreed. I would actually go a step further and create a private method to avoid exposing T (and so it actually represents a single type), but I decided to go the simple way here. – shmosel May 17 '16 at 19:51

You can rewrite the useEntries method as follows:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static void useEntries() {
    for (Map.Entry<GenericObject<?>, Function<?, ?>> currentEntry : map.entrySet()) {
        GenericObject key = currentEntry.getKey();
        Function value = currentEntry.getValue();
        key.set(value.apply(key.get()));
    }
}

Removing the generics from the GenericObject and Function within the method will allow you to make the calls on pure Object instances. It's then your responsibility to assure correct typing. The annotation SuppressWarning will remove compilation warnings which would be printed otherwise.

  • didnt thought of that one. stupidly simple. thanks – n247s May 17 '16 at 19:43
  • 2
    Don't use raw types: use casts. – Andy Turner May 17 '16 at 19:46
  • 1
    I would recommend casting before raw types. There's actually a bug in this code that's overlooked because of the raw types. – shmosel May 17 '16 at 19:47
  • @shmosel a bug, which is? – n247s May 17 '16 at 19:48
  • @n247s see my comment to your question. – shmosel May 17 '16 at 19:49

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