33

I was wondering how to remove:

  • All leading/trailing whitespace or new-line characters, null characters, etc.
  • Any redundant spaces within a string (ex. "hello[space][space]world" would be converted to "hello[space]world")

Is this possible with a single Regex, with unicode support for international space characters, etc.?

6
  • 3
    strings.TrimSpace()
    – Ben Guild
    Commented May 18, 2016 at 5:06
  • It'd be cleaner to define a simple function....
    – Ben Guild
    Commented May 18, 2016 at 5:07
  • 1
    s := strings.TrimSpace(strings.Replace(orig, " ", " ", -1)) seems pretty simple. Space characters are typically just the ASCII space. If you are getting different space characters then you need to handle those explicitly.
    – elithrar
    Commented May 18, 2016 at 5:24
  • Chec this code. Commented May 18, 2016 at 7:24
  • @WiktorStribiżew that looks like a possible fit, I think I had something similar calculated with PHP ... $output=preg_replace('/^\p{Z}+|\p{Z}+$/u','',$input); ... Is that equivalent? Could you post a solution?
    – Ben Guild
    Commented May 18, 2016 at 7:32

7 Answers 7

107

You can get quite far just using the strings package as strings.Fields does most of the work for you:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func standardizeSpaces(s string) string {
    return strings.Join(strings.Fields(s), " ")
}

func main() {
    tests := []string{" Hello,   World  ! ", "Hello,\tWorld ! ", " \t\n\t Hello,\tWorld\n!\n\t"}
    for _, test := range tests {
        fmt.Println(standardizeSpaces(test))
    }
}
// "Hello, World !"
// "Hello, World !"
// "Hello, World !"
1
  • 6
    great answer if you don't want to use regex! Commented Aug 8, 2017 at 16:59
31

It seems that you might want to use both \s shorthand character class and \p{Zs} Unicode property to match Unicode spaces. However, both steps cannot be done with 1 regex replacement as you need two different replacements, and the ReplaceAllStringFunc only allows a whole match string as argument (I have no idea how to check which group matched).

Thus, I suggest using two regexps:

  • ^[\s\p{Zs}]+|[\s\p{Zs}]+$ - to match all leading/trailing whitespace
  • [\s\p{Zs}]{2,} - to match 2 or more whitespace symbols inside a string

Sample code:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "regexp"
)

func main() {
    input := "   Text   More here     "
    re_leadclose_whtsp := regexp.MustCompile(`^[\s\p{Zs}]+|[\s\p{Zs}]+$`)
    re_inside_whtsp := regexp.MustCompile(`[\s\p{Zs}]{2,}`)
    final := re_leadclose_whtsp.ReplaceAllString(input, "")
    final = re_inside_whtsp.ReplaceAllString(final, " ")
    fmt.Println(final)
}
0
13

strings.Fields() splits on any amount of white space, thus:

strings.Join(strings.Fields(strings.TrimSpace(s)), " ")
1

Using single regexp to grab all the space using regexp.MustCompile() and replacing them to single space, and trimming the leading spaces finally.

    package main

    import (
        "fmt"
        "regexp"
        "strings"
    )
    
    func main() {
        input := "    Text   More here        "
        re := regexp.MustCompile(`\s+`)
        out := re.ReplaceAllString(input, " ")
        out = strings.TrimSpace(out)
        fmt.Println(out)
    } 

Alternatively, using "_" instead of space.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "regexp"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    input := "___Text___More_here______"
    re := regexp.MustCompile(`_+`)
    out := re.ReplaceAllString(input, "_")
    out = strings.Trim(out, "_")
    fmt.Println(out)
}
0

Avoiding to use time wasting regexp or external library
I've choose to use plain golang instead of regexp, cause there are special character that are not ASCII in every language.

Go Golang!

func RemoveDoubleWhiteSpace(str string) string {
    var b strings.Builder
    b.Grow(len(str))
    for i := range str {
        if !(str[i] == 32 && (i+1 < len(str) && str[i+1] == 32)) {
            b.WriteRune(rune(str[i]))
        }
    }
    return b.String()
}

And the related test

func TestRemoveDoubleWhiteSpace(t *testing.T) {
    data := []string{`  test`, `test  `, `te  st`}
    for _, item := range data {
        str := RemoveDoubleWhiteSpace(item)
        t.Log("Data ->|"+item+"|Found: |"+str+"| Len: ", len(str))
        if len(str) != 5 {
            t.Fail()
        }
    }
}
2
  • this works amazingly well! But if I use chars like "è" or "à" it doesn't. Can you help me?
    – Fred Hors
    Commented Mar 28, 2022 at 11:50
  • @FredHors this may be because your string was not normalized. In general, this solution above won't work well for Unicode strings that use multi-byte characters. If you want to go with a loop, you should iterate over runes rather than characters Commented Jun 14, 2022 at 4:44
0
// Ref: https://stackoverflow.com/a/42251527/18152508
func StrFields(input string) string {
    return strings.Join(strings.Fields(input), " ")
}

// Ref: https://stackoverflow.com/a/37293398/18152508
func RegexReplace(input string) string {
    re_leadclose_whtsp := regexp.MustCompile(`^[\s\p{Zs}]+|[\s\p{Zs}]+$`)
    re_inside_whtsp := regexp.MustCompile(`[\s\p{Zs}]{2,}`)

    return re_inside_whtsp.ReplaceAllString(
        re_leadclose_whtsp.ReplaceAllString(input, ""),
        " ",
    )
}

// Ref: https://stackoverflow.com/a/67152714/18152508
func SingleRegexp(input string) string {
    re := regexp.MustCompile(`\s+`)

    return strings.TrimSpace(re.ReplaceAllString(input, " "))
}

Benchmarking the above 3 functions, the @ifross' method using strings.Fields function was much faster than the accepted answer and using regular expressions.

Therefore, I prefer the combination of strings.Fields and strings.Join simply to reduce redundant and repetitive whitespace in strings.

$ go test -bench . -count 30 ./... > bench.txt && benchstat bench.txt
name            time/op
StrFields-4      204ns ± 1%
RegexReplace-4  8.35µs ± 2%
SingleRegexp-4  2.49µs ± 1%
var testData = []string{
    " Hello,   World  ! ",
    // "Hello,\tWorld ! ",
    // " \t\n\t Hello,\tWorld\n!\n\t",
}

var testFunc = []struct {
    name string
    exec func(string) string
}{
    {name: "StrFields", exec: StrFields},
    {name: "RegexReplace", exec: RegexReplace},
    {name: "SingleRegexp", exec: SingleRegexp},
}

func Test(t *testing.T) {
    for _, targetFunc := range testFunc {
        t.Run(targetFunc.name, func(t *testing.T) {
            for index, input := range testData {
                expect := "Hello, World !"
                actual := targetFunc.exec(input)

                if expect != actual {
                    t.Errorf("#%d: expect %q, actual %q", index+1, expect, actual)
                }
            }
        })
    }
}

func BenchmarkStrFields(b *testing.B) {
    const data = " Hello,   World  ! "

    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        _ = StrFields(data)
    }
}

func BenchmarkRegexReplace(b *testing.B) {
    const data = " Hello,   World  ! "

    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        _ = RegexReplace(data)
    }
}

func BenchmarkSingleRegexp(b *testing.B) {
    const data = " Hello,   World  ! "

    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        _ = SingleRegexp(data)
    }
}
-1

Use regexp for this.

func main() {
    data := []byte("   Hello,   World !   ")
    re := regexp.MustCompile("  +")
    replaced := re.ReplaceAll(bytes.TrimSpace(data), []byte(" "))
    fmt.Println(string(replaced))
    // Hello, World !
}

In order to also trim newlines and null characters, you can use the bytes.Trim(src []byte, cutset string) function instead of bytes.TrimSpace

2
  • Would this also cover unicode, and any other "invisible" characters, etc.? Ideally hoping to eliminate two seemingly appearing equal strings from matching in most cases.
    – Ben Guild
    Commented May 18, 2016 at 5:43
  • I suggest you read about golang strings (blog.golang.org/strings) then modify this code to replace the exact characters you want to replace. My code is meant to be an example of how to do what you asked, not the exact solution. Commented May 18, 2016 at 5:54

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