5

I am calculating the most frequent number in a vector of int8s. Numba complains when I set up a counter array of ints:

@jit(nopython=True)
def freq_int8(y):
    """Find most frequent number in array"""
    count = np.zeros(256, dtype=int)
    for val in y:
        count[val] += 1
    return ((np.argmax(count)+128) % 256) - 128

Calling it I get the following error:

TypingError: Invalid usage of Function(<built-in function zeros>) with parameters (int64, Function(<class 'int'>))

If I delete dtype=int it works and I get a decent speedup. I am however puzzled as to why declaring an array of ints isn't working. Is there a known workaround, and would there be any efficiency gain worth having here?

Background: I am trying to shave microseconds off some numpy-heavy code. I am especially being hurt by numpy.median, and have been looking into Numba, but am struggling to improve on median. Finding the most frequent number is an acceptable alternative to median, and here I've been able to gain some performance. The above numba code is also faster than numpy.bincount.

Update: After input in the accepted answer, here's an implementation of median for int8 vectors. It is roughly an order of magnitude faster than numpy.median:

@jit(nopython=True)
def median_int8(y):
    N2 = len(y)//2
    count = np.zeros(256, dtype=np.int32)
    for val in y:
        count[val] += 1
    cs = 0
    for i in range(-128, 128):
        cs += count[i]
        if cs > N2:
            return float(i)
        elif cs == N2:
            j = i+1
            while count[j] == 0:
                j += 1
            return (i + j)/2

Surprisingly, the performance difference is even greater for short vectors, apparently due to overhead in numpy vectors:

>>> a = np.random.randint(-128, 128, 10)

>>> %timeit np.median(a)
    The slowest run took 7.03 times longer than the fastest. This could mean that an intermediate result is being cached.
    10000 loops, best of 3: 20.8 µs per loop

>>> %timeit median_int8(a)
    The slowest run took 11.67 times longer than the fastest. This could mean that an intermediate result is being cached.
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 593 ns per loop

This overhead is so large, I'm wondering if something is wrong.

8

Just a quick note, finding the most frequent number is normally called mode, and it is as similar to the median as it is the mean... in which case np.mean will be considerably faster. Unless you have some constrains or particularities in your data, there is no guarantee that the mode approximates the median.

If you still want to calculate the mode of a list of integer numbers, np.bincount, as you mention, should be enough (if numba is faster, it shouldn't be by much):

count = np.bincount(y, minlength=256)
result = ((np.argmax(count)+128) % 256) - 128

Note I've added the minlength parameter to np.bincount just so it returns the same 256 length list that you have in your code. But it is completely unnecessary in practice, as you only want the argmax, np.bincount (without minlength) will return a list which length is the maximum number in y.

As for the numba error, replacing dtype=int with dtype=np.int32 should solve the problem. int is a python function, and you are specifying nopython in the numba header. If you remove nopython, then either dtype=int or dtype='i' will also work (having the same effect).

  • 1
    So that's what mode means! Yes, I understand the difference to median, but in my particular use-case, mode is probably even more appropriate than median. Your suggestion of using dtype=np.int32, does indeed work, and provided a further 30% speedup. As for bincount, that also works as wanted, but is roughly half as fast as the numba version. – DNF May 18 '16 at 12:11
  • 1
    @DNF numba is indeed faster than bincount, but note that the first call of numba is always slower (unless you call it with very big arrays). If you are defining the function to call it only once (in an small array), then the speed with be considerably worse than np.bincount. If on the other hand, if you are calling the function multiple times, or with an array big enough so that numba can optimize it on the fly, numba should work fine. – Imanol Luengo May 18 '16 at 12:42
  • It should be running for millions or tens or millions of times per session, and will be running across several processors. But do you happen to know if starting a new process will trigger a new compilation? – DNF May 18 '16 at 15:45
  • @DNF Depends of by processor you mean an actual python process or a thread. But my first guess would be to say yes, it will trigger a new compilation. However, if the arrays are large, numba will compile it on the fly making it fast, so you don't have to worry about. And, if the arrays are small, the time lost in the first run will be insignificant. So either way, if you run it millions of times, it should be fine. – Imanol Luengo May 18 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    For completeness, here's my implementation of median for int8 vectors: @jit(nopython=True) def median_int8(y): N2 = len(y)//2 count = np.zeros(256, dtype=np.int32) for val in y: count[val] += 1 cs = 0 for i in range(-128, 128): cs += count[i] if cs < N2: continue elif cs > N2: return float(i) else: j = i+1 while count[j] == 0: j += 1 return (i + j)/2 It is roughly an order of magnitude faster than numpy.median. Ouch, ugly formatting! – DNF May 19 '16 at 10:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.