11

Consider following code, I don't understand why empty function of print must be defined.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void print()
{   
}   

    template <typename T, typename... Types>
void print (const T& firstArg, const Types&... args)
{   
    cout << firstArg << endl; // print first argument
    print(args...); // call print() for remaining arguments
}

int main()
{   
    int i=1;
    int  j=2;
    char c = 'T';
    print(i,"hello",j,i,c,"word");

}   
  • This is classic recursion where print() is your base case. – erip May 18 '16 at 14:06
13

CORRECT WAY:

Variadic templates is strictly related to induction, a mathematical concept.

The compiler resolves the following function call

print('a', 3, 4.0f);

into

std::cout<< 'a' <<std::endl;
print(3, 4.0f);

which is resolved into

std::cout<< 'a' <<std::endl;
std::cout<< 3 <<std::endl;
print( 4.0f);

which is resolved into

std::cout<< 'a' <<std::endl;
std::cout<< 3 <<std::endl;
std::cout<< 4.0f <<std::endl;
print();

At this point it searches for a function overload whose match is the empty function.

  • All functions that have 1 or more arguments are matched to the variadic template
  • All functions that have no argument are matched to the empty function

The culprit is that you must have, for every possible combination of parameters, only 1 function.


ERROR 1:

Doing the following would be an error

template< typename T>
void print( const T& arg) // first version
{   
    cout<< arg<<endl;
}   

template <typename T, typename... Types>
void print (const T& firstArg, const Types&... args) // second version
{   
    cout << firstArg << endl; // print first argument
    print(args...); // call print() for remaining arguments
}

Because when you call print the compiler doesn't know which function to call.

Does print(3) refers to "first" or "second" version? Both would be valid because the first has 1 parameter, and the second can accept one parameter too.

print(3); // error, ambiguous, which one you want to call, the 1st or the 2nd?

ERROR 2:

The following would be an error anyway

// No empty function

template <typename T, typename... Types>
void print (const T& firstArg, const Types&... args) 
{   
    cout << firstArg << endl; // print first argument
    print(args...); // call print() for remaining arguments
}

In fact, if you use it alone without the compiler would do

 print('k', 0, 6.5);

which is resolved into

 std::cout<<'k'<<std::endl;
 print(0, 6.5);

which is resolved into

 std::cout<<'k'<<std::endl;
 std::cout<< 0 <<std::endl;
 print( 6.5);

which is resolved into

 std::cout<<'k'<<std::endl;
 std::cout<< 0 <<std::endl;
 std::cout<< 6.5 <<std::endl;
 print(); //Oops error, no function 'print' to call with no arguments

As you see in the last attempt, the compiler tries to call print() with no arguments. However if such a function does not exists it is not called, and that's why you should provide that empty function (don't worry, the compiler will optimize code so empty functions don't decrease performance).

  • , why recursion tree is used ? Is there any other method to iterate over the Args of a variadic template ? – Adib May 18 '16 at 12:54
  • Nope, there is no other way, there are utils that allows to do that args[x] however those utils use on their own recursion too, and thus add just extra compile time. Recursio is used because how the compiler work, It replace code, then it replace code again until it gets an error, until it replace everything or unti it reach maximum replacing limit – GameDeveloper May 18 '16 at 12:56
  • 2
    Your "Error 1" is in fact perfectly fine. Partial ordering handles that case correctly. – T.C. May 18 '16 at 17:21
  • @T.C. Partial ordering handles that case, so your right, it's strictly not an error. But it's not a good practice : order of declaration is important and useful code is duplicated in both functions. We use function precisely to avoid code duplication. So, IMHO, it's a design error – Garf365 May 19 '16 at 7:13
10

If you don't have empty print function, imagine a call with 2 parameters :

  1. print (a, b) => cout << a << endl and call print(b)
  2. print (b) => cout << b << endl and call print()

oups, print() doesn't exists, because only print with at least one parameter exists ! So you need a print without parameters.

print without any parameters is your final call

  • variadic means at least one parameter? – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 18 '16 at 11:39
  • @tobi303 No, variadic doesn't means at least one parameter, but print(const T& firstArg, const Types&... args) means at least one parameter. if you write print(const Types& ...args) it's means 0 or more parameter – Garf365 May 18 '16 at 11:40
  • @tobi303 No. But look at the prototype of the OP's print: it takes one fixed parameter, and then a (possibly empty) variadic pack. – Reinstate Monica May 18 '16 at 11:40
  • ups sorry I overlooked that firstArg. Would it also work to declare a print taking a single argument and stop the "kind-of-recusion" with that? – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 18 '16 at 12:08
6

Because (using a very "simple" level of explanation) the variadic templates mechanism works like a recursion (it is NOT recursion but this is the simplest way to comprehend it), which "consumes" the variadic parameter list, so you will have to define a "stop" function, at which it will recur in the last step of recursion when the "consumed" parameter list is "empty". This was the explanation that I found the easiest to understand this pretty complex notion.

At the very first step (in main) you will get a function which has the parameters: (int, const char*, int, int, char, const char*)

Then the variadic parameters are slowly being processed in the variadic function itself, leaving you in the second step with (const char*, int, int, char, const char*) then (int, int, char, const char*) and so on ... till you reach the last element (const char*), and when this is also processed in the next step you end up with (), and the compiler needs this function as a "terminator"

(Yes, this is very non technical and sounds like grandpa frog telling a story to little froglings ...)

  • why do you say this is not recursion? Isnt the same function recursively called with decreasing number of parameters? – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 18 '16 at 11:40
  • @tobi303 You're calling print() without any template paramters. They're automatically deduced. What happens when you run out of template parameters? – uh oh somebody needs a pupper May 18 '16 at 11:40
  • @tobi303 it's not same function: at compilation time, template are used to create many different functions. So according number of parameter and type, compiler will create as many needed functions – Garf365 May 18 '16 at 11:42
  • @Garf365 ah now I understand. I would still call it recursion, but maybe it is better to be careful with such words. – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 18 '16 at 12:07
3

To add on to the other answers, I would like to show what the compiler has to generate for the template calls.

nm -g -C ./a.out (non-optimized build) gives:

void print<char [5]>(char const (&) [5])
void print<char [5]>(char const (&) [5])
void print<char [6], int, int, char, char [5]>(char const (&) [6], int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<char [6], int, int, char, char [5]>(char const (&) [6], int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<char, char [5]>(char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<char, char [5]>(char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, char [6], int, int, char, char [5]>(int const&, char const (&) [6], int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, char, char [5]>(int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, int, char, char [5]>(int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, char [6], int, int, char, char [5]>(int const&, char const (&) [6], int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, char, char [5]>(int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
void print<int, int, char, char [5]>(int const&, int const&, char const&, char const (&) [5])
print()

You can see all the instantiations of the print function. The final function that ultimately calls print() is void print<char [5]>(char const (&) [5])>

You can see that when passed an empty parameter pack, the template parameter list must necessarily be empty. Therefore it just calls print(). If you explicitly specified the template parameters, like print<T, Args...>(t, args...) you would get infinite recursion.

  • Is that the output of the compiler? it bogus me it duplicates every overload (why the first 2 lines are equal?) – GameDeveloper May 18 '16 at 12:03
  • @DarioOO That's from nm. It's more convenient than objdump, which would show the actual symbols used. Or one could just use gdb but that's too noisy to put into an answer. – uh oh somebody needs a pupper May 18 '16 at 12:04
  • ok thanks :). Was not aware of the tool/trick to track down symbols. Very valuable – GameDeveloper May 18 '16 at 12:05
3

Recursion is the most general way to program variadic templates, but it's far from the only way. For simple use cases like this, doing a pack expansion directly within a braced initializer list is shorter and likely faster to compile.

template <typename... Types>
void print (const Types&... args)
{   
    using expander = int[];
    (void) expander { 0, (void(cout << args << endl), 0) ...};
}

In C++17, we'll be able to use a fold expression:

template <typename... Types>
void print (const Types&... args)
{   
    (void(cout << args << endl) , ...);
}

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