5

If a variable was already malloc'ed in the past, what happens if you call malloc on it again rather than realloc? Will it cause a memory leak?

I'd like to know so that I can add checks before malloc calls on parameters passed to functions in order to avoid potential leaks.

void memtest(char **foo)
{
        if ( foo )
                *foo = malloc(10); // Assuming *foo was already allocated in the past.
}

Should I always do the following?

void memtest(char **foo)
{
        if ( foo ) {
                if ( *foo ) {
                        free(*foo);

                        *foo = NULL;
                }

                *foo = malloc(10);
        }
}
  • Question would be better if you will add a code snippet. – haccks May 19 '16 at 6:40
  • 1
    There is no such thing as "calling malloc on a variable". – immibis May 19 '16 at 6:51
5

There is no such thing as "calling malloc on a variable".

malloc finds some "free" memory, marks it as "used", and returns the address of the start of the memory it just found. free marks some "used" memory as "free".

When you run

*foo = malloc(10);

the following happens:

  • malloc finds 10 bytes of free memory.
  • malloc marks those 10 bytes as used.
  • malloc returns the address of the start of the 10 bytes it just found.
  • Your program looks at the value of foo, which is an address because foo is a pointer.
  • Your program stores the address malloc returned, at the address that was stored in foo.

malloc couldn't care less what your program does with the address it returned. It doesn't care whether your program stores it in a simple variable, an array, another malloced space, or even writes it to a file. It doesn't even care if your program forgets the address, but you should care, because your program will never be able to call free if it doesn't know the address of the memory it's trying to free.

Given this knowledge, you should be able to see what this code does:

char *bar;
bar = malloc(10);
bar = malloc(10);
free(bar);

Take your time to figure it out, then read below:

 

 

  • A variable called bar is declared. Its type is char*.
  • The program calls malloc.
  • malloc finds 10 free bytes and marks them as used.
  • malloc returns the address of the start of the 10 bytes.
  • The program stores the address in bar. (bar now contains the address of the first 10 bytes)
  • The program calls malloc.
  • malloc finds 10 more free bytes and marks them as used.
  • malloc returns the address of the start of the 10 bytes.
  • The program stores the address in bar. (bar now contains the address of the second 10 bytes)
  • The program calls free and passes it the address of the start of the second 10 bytes.
  • free marks the second 10 bytes as free.

This is a memory leak. The first 10 bytes will never be freed. I can tell they'll never be freed, because the program doesn't know what address they're at.

But what about this program?

char *bar;
char *baz;
bar = malloc(10);

baz = bar;
baz = malloc(10);

Here I've called malloc "on" a variable that was already holding the address of something malloced. So is this a memory leak? Not by itself. The program might still free the first memory block, whose address is still stored in baz.

But, this is definitely a memory leak:

void func()
{
    char *bar;
    char *baz;
    bar = malloc(10);

    baz = bar;
    baz = malloc(10);
}

I haven't even changed the code, but just by putting it in a function, it's now a memory leak! Whaaaaaaaaa?

Remember what a memory leak actually is. A memory leak is when a program allocates memory but never frees it. You can't tell whether a program frees all its memory just by looking at the malloc calls.


As for the second part - "should I do this?"

No, you should not.

It will only work if the old value at the address passed to your function is a malloced pointer, and if the caller forgot to free it.

Your suggestion will break any of these functions:

void func1()
{
    char c;
    char *ptr = &c;
    memtest(&ptr); // Tries to free something that wasn't malloced!
    // ... do something with ptr ...
}
void func2()
{
    char *ptr;
    memtest(&ptr); // Passes a garbage address to free!
    // ... do something with ptr ...
}
void func3()
{
    char *ptr1 = malloc(5)
    char *ptr2 = ptr1;
    memtest(&ptr1);
    // ... do something with ptr1 and ptr2 ...
    free(ptr1); // Frees memory that was already freed!
}

In conclusion: The question in the title does not make sense. And detecting memory leaks is not as simple as this. And what you are trying to do is a bad idea.

  • I feel like I got the accepted answer automatically just from bothering to write a long answer. Was it actually helpful? – immibis May 19 '16 at 7:18
  • I am thinking the same. You got the reward for your hard work :) – haccks May 19 '16 at 7:26
  • Yes,more write faster is the answer accepted... ahah ;) BTW good answer. – LPs May 19 '16 at 7:27
5

If the pointer for *foo contained the only pointer to the previously allocated memory, you've just leaked the memory that was there before. Otherwise, it is completely innocuous.

5

The call to malloc is irrelevant.

The problem is the assignment, if there is a problem. After you do x=42; the previous value of x is gone, no matter how important it might have been. Similarly, if foo is the only pointer you have to some memory, if you overwrite foo, you no longer have access to that memory.

You can't call free without specifying what to free. So if you didn't free the memory before you lost the only pointer you had to it, you're not going to ever be able to free it, which is the definition of a memory leak.

3

It causes memory leak due to the fact that the previous allocated memory is not referred by any variable and you lost its address.

There are no specific check on that. You could set the pointer to NULL on declaration and set it to NULL each time the memory is freeed. Then you can check if (pointer == NULL) before to call malloc.

Using realloc you could avoid problems of memory leak, because if pointer is a null pointer, the realloc function behaves like the malloc function for the specified size. But it could causes problem if your pointer is not declared set to NULL.

i.e.:

int *foo = NULL;

void bar( void )
{
     foo = realloc(foo, 10*sizeof(int));
}

A good or bad feature of realloc is it preserve the content of your memory.

Should I always do the following?

void memtest(char **foo)
{
        if ( *foo )
                free(*foo);

        *foo = malloc(10);
}

No you shouldn't because of free doesn't set the pointer to NULL and if your pointer still have the value of an already freeed memory the program break with error. I mean that such a code is error prone in case of you free the pointer somewhere in code without reallocating it. And you must ensure that pointer is declared with NULL as init value.

  • This makes me wonder: why have malloc in the first place then? Everyone can always just use realloc. Of course, one should wrap the entire function body block in an if checking to make sure that the pointer itself is not NULL. – The_Androctonus May 19 '16 at 7:00
  • It is, my personal opinion, to have a more readable code. I mean use realloc only when you are reallocating something previously mallocated and where you want to preserve the content of memory. But you can use realloc only in a whole code and a single free. – LPs May 19 '16 at 7:07
1

What happens when you call malloc on an existing variable?

There are few possibilities:

  • If memory is allocated successfully by previous malloc then re allocating memory will cause memory leak .
  • If anyhow memory allocation by previous malloc call is failed then there will be no memory leak.

Should I always do the following?

void memtest(char **foo)
{
        if ( *foo )
                free(*foo); 
        *foo = malloc(10);
} 

Yes. By this way you are ensuring no memory leak.

  • free doesn't set pointer to NULL then if ( *foo ) free(*foo); is wrong. I'm missing something? – LPs May 19 '16 at 6:59
  • @LPs; if ( *foo ) is checking whether previous call of malloc was successful. In case it was unsuccessfull, malloc must have returned NULL. So, if *foo is not pointing to NULL then free the allocating chunk. Note that*foo is freed after checking *foo for NULL. – haccks May 19 '16 at 7:04
  • I meant that if in other part of code the memory is free and not allocated a function like that fails. – LPs May 19 '16 at 7:09
  • @LPs; I think I misunderstood you comment. See, *foo = malloc(10) will either allocate memory requested and make *foo to point to the first block of allocated chunk or it will return NULL which will be assigned to *foo. If allocated memory is already freed then better to assign NULL to the pointer pointing to that memory. – haccks May 19 '16 at 7:15
  • Yes, exactly what I meant. Well, is a matter of best practice for code maintenance. In case of a coder free memory without re-allocate it because it doesn't need to reallocate it. :) – LPs May 19 '16 at 7:24

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