9

I have a question regarding the priority of environment variables when working with spring cloud config server

In my service I have a local properties file application.yml with this content

foo:
  bar: "some"
  buz: "some"
  joe: "some"

The service is also connected to a config server with a configuration repository that contains a file testservice-api.yml (where testservice-api is the spring application name of the service). The contents of this file is:

foo:
  bar: "some-specific"

So with this setup the configuration at runtime would result in this:

{
    "foo.bar": "some-specific",
    "foo.buz": "some",
    "foo.joe": "some"
}

Now I try to override foo.bar and foo.joe with an environment variable.

So I start the service with this command:

FOO_BAR=some-env FOO_JOE=some-env gradle bootRun

From what I read in this part of the spring boot documentation the environment variables should have priority over the configuration files - also the spring cloud config documentation does not state sth different - so I would expect the result to be:

{
    "foo.bar": "some-env",
    "foo.buz": "some",
    "foo.joe": "some-env"
}

But instead I get:

{
    "foo.bar": "some-specific",
    "foo.buz": "some",
    "foo.joe": "some-env"
}

So only the configuration from the local configuration file inside the jar is overridden by the environment variable - the property from the config repo seems to have priority over the environment variable.

Is this explainable - Or is this a bug? Any hints in this one?

Please find the example code here:

https://github.com/mduesterhoeft/configserver-test

The README in the repository lists the issue described here as Use Case 3

8

define following properties in git repo (as a source for config-server) [for given profile]: spring.cloud.config: overrideSystemProperties: false overrideNone: true

keep in mind properties (especially overrideSystemProperties & overrideNone) in bootsrap.yml are overriden by those from config-server by default

  • 2
    Just FYI, for me this worked when I put it in the git repo config file for the individual application (the config client) and didn't work when I put it in the git repo config file for the config server – Matt Nov 2 '16 at 18:13
  • 2
    After some thought, I realized that it is cool that it is possible to do this, BUT, it is probably not a good idea. The whole point of pulling in a centralized config component is to gain just that - centralized config. If you start allowing it to become distributed config, there are 101 ways things are going to to wrong. Consider what happens if you need to change an API key, that was supplied via env var. You will need to restart the service. What point is there then to config server? Use with caution! – demaniak Apr 6 '17 at 13:12
  • 1
    There are variables that MUST be injected by overriding the config-server. For example, imagine that you have a Kubernetes deployment that points to a Service with a dynamic name (changes everytime the Helm chart is deployed). The configserver will never know the right name and it would be awful to have to manually change the configuration everytime the dynamic name changes. Though, it could be done with a Jenkins pipeline that changes the code of the repository and commits, it is too complex. – AFP_555 Oct 16 '18 at 18:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.