115

How do I automatically restart Kubernetes pods and pods associated with deployments when their configmap is changed/updated?


I know there's been talk about the ability to automatically restart pods when a config maps changes but to my knowledge this is not yet available in Kubernetes 1.2.

So what (I think) I'd like to do is a "rolling restart" of the deployment resource associated with the pods consuming the config map. Is it possible, and if so how, to force a rolling restart of a deployment in Kubernetes without changing anything in the actual template? Is this currently the best way to do it or is there a better option?

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  • $ kubectl set env deployment my deployment --env="LAST_RESTART=$(date)" --namespace ... do the job for me – maciek Mar 29 '19 at 14:58
58

Signalling a pod on config map update is a feature in the works (https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/issues/22368).

You can always write a custom pid1 that notices the confimap has changed and restarts your app.

You can also eg: mount the same config map in 2 containers, expose a http health check in the second container that fails if the hash of config map contents changes, and shove that as the liveness probe of the first container (because containers in a pod share the same network namespace). The kubelet will restart your first container for you when the probe fails.

Of course if you don't care about which nodes the pods are on, you can simply delete them and the replication controller will "restart" them for you.

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  • With "deleting pods" you mean: Collecting all pod names, delete one, wait until replaced, delete second one, wait until replaced etc. Correct? – Torsten Bronger Oct 13 '16 at 17:27
  • 6
    using a deployment I would scale it down and then up. You will still have that small amount of down time though. You can do it in one line to reduce that... kubectl scale deployment/update-demo --replicas=0; kubectl scale deployment/update-demo --replicas=4; – Nick H Oct 25 '16 at 2:50
  • If you don't want to find all the pods, and don't care about downtime - just remove the RC and then re-create the RC. – Drew Oct 26 '16 at 21:58
  • 1
    Does this mean the volume it’s mounted on is updated and you just need to re-read the file on the pod without restarting the whole pod? – Matt Williamson Apr 13 '18 at 11:54
  • @NickH Quick and dirty, fortunately the downtime was acceptable in my case and this worked great, thanks! – ChocolateAndCheese Apr 19 '18 at 21:02
125

The current best solution to this problem (referenced deep in https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/issues/22368 linked in the sibling answer) is to use Deployments, and consider your ConfigMaps to be immutable.

When you want to change your config, create a new ConfigMap with the changes you want to make, and point your deployment at the new ConfigMap. If the new config is broken, the Deployment will refuse to scale down your working ReplicaSet. If the new config works, then your old ReplicaSet will be scaled to 0 replicas and deleted, and new pods will be started with the new config.

Not quite as quick as just editing the ConfigMap in place, but much safer.

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  • 2
    This is the approach we've taken as well – Johan Nov 16 '16 at 6:50
  • 4
    Worth mentioning that the new experimental tool kustomize supports automatically creating a deterministic configmap hash, meaning you don't need to manually create a new configmap: github.com/kubernetes-sigs/kustomize/blob/… – Symmetric Aug 13 '18 at 16:49
28

https://github.com/kubernetes/helm/blob/master/docs/charts_tips_and_tricks.md#user-content-automatically-roll-deployments-when-configmaps-or-secrets-change

Often times configmaps or secrets are injected as configuration files in containers. Depending on the application a restart may be required should those be updated with a subsequent helm upgrade, but if the deployment spec itself didn't change the application keeps running with the old configuration resulting in an inconsistent deployment.

The sha256sum function can be used together with the include function to ensure a deployments template section is updated if another spec changes:

kind: Deployment
spec:
  template:
    metadata:
      annotations:
        checksum/config: {{ include (print $.Template.BasePath "/secret.yaml") . | sha256sum }}
[...]

In my case, for some reasons, $.Template.BasePath didn't work but $.Chart.Name does:

spec:
  replicas: 1
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: admin-app
      annotations:
        checksum/config: {{ include (print $.Chart.Name "/templates/" $.Chart.Name "-configmap.yaml") . | sha256sum }}
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  • 8
    Not applicable to general Kubernetes usage, only applicable to Helm – Emii Khaos Apr 16 '18 at 14:25
  • 2
    The answer is helpful but probably not relevant to this question – Anand Singh Kunwar Jul 4 '18 at 13:50
  • helm 3 was released recently. Thus, the link is outdated. It points to master branch. The following URL will lead to (currently) latest helm 2 docs: github.com/helm/helm/blob/release-2.16/docs/… – Marcel Hoyer Nov 27 '19 at 17:03
  • Cool solution. I changed to sha1sum, as in my case sha256sum had 65 characters which resulted in Deployment.apps "xxx" is invalid: metadata.labels: Invalid value: "xxx": must be no more than 63 characters. Alternative would be | trunc 63, but sha1sum should be "more unique". – iptizer Feb 3 at 16:58
27

The best way I've found to do it is run Reloader

It allows you to define configmaps or secrets to watch, when they get updated, a rolling update of your deployment is performed. Here's an example:

You have a deployment foo and a ConfigMap called foo-configmap. You want to roll the pods of the deployment every time the configmap is changed. You need to run Reloader with:

kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/stakater/Reloader/master/deployments/kubernetes/reloader.yaml

Then specify this annotation in your deployment:

kind: Deployment
metadata:
  annotations:
    configmap.reloader.stakater.com/reload: "foo-configmap"
  name: foo
...
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10

You can update a metadata label that is not relevant for your deployment. it will trigger a rolling-update

for example:

metadata:
  labels:
    configmap-version: 1
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  • I looking docs about metadata: labels: configmap-version: 1 – c4f4t0r Aug 17 '18 at 11:12
  • 6
    metadata label changes do not trigger a restart of the pods – dan carter Jan 24 '19 at 21:47
  • This answer has upwotes so I need to ask. If we update the metadata, will Kubernetes cluster trigger a rolling update? @maoz-zadok – titus Jan 8 at 19:46
  • I believe this works as long as the metadata label is under template.spec – Saikiran Yerram May 5 at 5:04
0

Had this problem where the Deployment was in a sub-chart and the values controlling it were in the parent chart's values file. This is what we used to trigger restart:

spec:
  template:
    metadata:
      annotations:
        checksum/config: {{ tpl (toYaml .Values) . | sha256sum }}

Obviously this will trigger restart on any value change but it works for our situation. What was originally in the child chart would only work if the config.yaml in the child chart itself changed:

    checksum/config: {{ include (print $.Template.BasePath "/config.yaml") . | sha256sum }}
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-1

Another way is to stick it into the command section of the Deployment:

...
command: [ "echo", "
  option = value\n
  other_option = value\n
" ]
...

Alternatively, to make it more ConfigMap-like, use an additional Deployment that will just host that config in the command section and execute kubectl create on it while adding an unique 'version' to its name (like calculating a hash of the content) and modifying all the deployments that use that config:

...
command: [ "/usr/sbin/kubectl-apply-config.sh", "
  option = value\n
  other_option = value\n
" ]
...

I'll probably post kubectl-apply-config.sh if it ends up working.

(don't do that; it looks too bad)

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