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Given NxN two-dimensional array. Write a function that rotates it by 1 element clockwise (almost circling move).

[1][2][3][4]
[5][6][7][8]
[9][0][1][2]
[3][4][5][6]

Becomes:

[5][1][2][3]
[9][0][6][4]
[3][1][7][8]
[4][5][6][2]

Update: This was an online interview question - HackerRank. I couldn't solve it. All I found in StackOverflow so far are 90-degree rotation (if you found this question somewhere please share the link in comments).

  • What have you tried? Are there any special requirements/constraints in terms of speed, elegance, storage, etc.? – Axel Kemper May 19 '16 at 16:56
  • There are no requirements. As I wrote, I failed this interview question and want to see/learn different implementations. – AntonIva May 19 '16 at 17:46
1

I'm not very sure what kind of problem you've encountered, as obvious solution works well:

original array:

final int[][] a = { {1, 2, 3, 4}, {5, 6, 7, 8}, {9, 0, 1, 2}, {3, 4, 5, 6}};

rotation:

for (int i = 0; i < (a.length >>> 1); i++) {
    final int minx = i;
    final int miny = i;
    final int maxx = a.length - 1 - i;
    final int maxy = a.length - 1 - i;

    int incx = 1, incy = 0;
    int prev = a[miny][minx];
    for (int x = (minx + 1), y = miny; ((x != minx) || (y != miny)); x += incx, y += incy) {
        final int temp = a[y][x];
        a[y][x] = prev;
        prev = temp;
        if ((x == maxx) && (incx == 1)) {
            incx = 0;
            incy = 1;
        }
        if ((y == maxy) && (incy == 1)) {
            incx = -1;
            incy = 0;
        }
        if ((x == minx) && (incx == -1)) {
            incx = 0;
            incy = -1;
        }
    }
    a[miny][minx] = prev;
}

output:

5 1 2 3 
9 0 6 4 
3 1 7 8 
4 5 6 2 
0

Another solution in Java.

The row and column distances are declared rather than computed.

final int[][] a = { { 1, 2, 3, 4 }, { 5, 6, 7, 8 }, { 9, 0, 1, 2 },
                { 3, 4, 5, 6 } };

final int[][] dRow = { { 1, 0, 0, 0 }, { 1, 1, 0, -1 },
                { 1, 0, -1, -1 }, { 0, 0, 0, -1 } };
final int[][] dCol = { { 0, -1, -1, -1 }, { 0, 0, -1, 0 },
                { 0, 1, 0, 0 }, { 1, 1, 1, 0 } };

int[][] tmp = { { 0, 0, 0, 0 }, { 0, 0, 0, 0 }, { 0, 0, 0, 0 },
                { 0, 0, 0, 0 } };

// rotate a to tmp
for (int row = 0; row < a.length; row++)
    for (int col = 0; col < a[row].length; col++)
        tmp[row][col] = a[row + dRow[row][col]][col + dCol[row][col]];

// copy tmp to a
for (int row = 0; row < a.length; row++)
    for (int col = 0; col < a[row].length; col++)
        a[row][col] = tmp[row][col];

// show result
for (int row = 0; row < a.length; row++)
    for (int col = 0; col < a[row].length; col++)
        System.out.print((col == 0 ? "\n" : "") + a[row][col]);
0

I quickly gave this a go, with a slightly different approach in Python for square matrix (you specified NxN). For each layer, I unwrap, rotate and re-apply. This is definitely more work than necessary, but was easy to trace and felt logical - and works for +-n step rotation.

def rotate_matrix(m, n):
    assert len(m) is len(m[0]), 'Assertion: rotation requires square matrix'

    rotated_matrix = [[None] * len(m[0]) for _ in range(len(m))]

    def _rotate_layer(ns):
        return ns[n:] + ns[:n]

    def _nth_layer(l):
        left = [m[i][l-1] for i in range(l-1, len(m)-(l-1))] 
        bottom = m[len(m)-1-(l-1)][l:len(m)-(l-1)]  
        right = [m[i][len(m[0])-l] for i in reversed(range(l-1, len(m)-l))] 
        upper = m[l-1][len(m[0])-l-1:l-1:-1]
        return left + bottom + right + upper

    def _apply_layer(l):
        ns = _rotate_layer(_nth_layer(l))
        for i in range(l-1, len(m)-(l-1)):
            rotated_matrix[i][l-1] = ns.pop(0)
        for i in range(l, len(m)-(l-1)):
            rotated_matrix[len(m)-1-(l-1)][i] = ns.pop(0)
        for i in reversed(range(l-1, len(m)-l)):
            rotated_matrix[i][len(m[0])-l] = ns.pop(0)
        for i in reversed(range(l, len(m[0])-l)):
            rotated_matrix[l-1][i] = ns.pop(0)

    for i in range(1, len(m)/2+1):
        _apply_layer(i)

    return rotated_matrix

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