41

If I have the table

enter image description here

SELECT (Firstname || '-' || Middlename || '-' || Surname)  AS example_column
FROM example_table

This will display Firstname-Middlename-Surname e.g.

John--Smith
Jane-Anne-Smith

The second one (Jane’s) displays correct, however since John doesn’t have a middlename, I want it to ignore the second dash.

How could I put a sort of IF Middlename = NULL statement in so that it would just display John-Smith

2
  • 4
    You need to tag the RDBMS you are using. Generally string concatenation differs with each vendor Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:37
  • Based on the popular four database, it's either Oracle or PostgreSQL Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:43

9 Answers 9

46

Here would be my suggestions:

PostgreSQL and other SQL databases where 'a' || NULL IS NULL, then use COALESCE:

SELECT firstname || COALESCE('-' || middlename, '') || '-' || surname ...

Oracle and other SQL databases where 'a' || NULL = 'a':

SELECT first name || DECODE(middlename, NULL, '', '-' || middlename) || '-' || surname...

I like to go for conciseness. Here it is not very interesting to any maintenance programmer whether the middle name is empty or not. CASE switches are perfectly fine, but they are bulky. I'd like to avoid repeating the same column name ("middle name") where possible.

As @Prdp noted, the answer is RDBMS-specific. What is specific is whether the server treats a zero-length string as being equivalent to NULL, which determines whether concatenating a NULL yields a NULL or not.

Generally COALESCE is most concise for PostgreSQL-style empty string handling, and DECODE (*VALUE*, NULL, ''... for Oracle-style empty string handling.

2
  • COALESCE('-' || NULLIF(middlename,''), '') worked for me since in my case middlename comprised of empty strings even though it was showing NULL in the output. Commented Dec 15, 2019 at 18:07
  • The first option works great for SQLite, thanks!
    – bmaupin
    Commented May 27, 2021 at 18:56
39

If you use Postgres, concat_ws() is what you are looking for:

SELECT concat_ws('-', Firstname, Middlename, Surname)  AS example_column
FROM example_table

SQLFiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!15/9eecb7db59d16c80417c72d1e1f4fbf1/8812

To treat empty strings or strings that only contain spaces like NULL use nullif():

 SELECT concat_ws('-', Firstname, nullif(trim(Middlename), ''), Surname)  AS example_column
 FROM example_table
6
  • based on the question, the answer is not complete. the null middle name should not have a double dash Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:55
  • 2
    @MichaelBuen: it won't. concat_ws() will take care of that.
    – user330315
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:03
  • +1 neat :) i just tested your code with empty string (not null), which is not in the question anyway, that's why i thought that didn't work. Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:07
  • 1
    @MichaelBuen: you could use nullif(middlename, '') to treat an empty string as null
    – user330315
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:45
  • Yes, i applied NULLIF on my answer. I forgot to apply the same on your concat_ws answer and tested on sqlfiddle, hence I thought concat_ws didn't work. Commented May 20, 2016 at 3:22
2

This approach works:

select first_name || coalesce('-' || middle_name, '') || '-' || last_name 
from t;

Output:

|        ?column? |
|-----------------|
|      john-smith |
| jane-anne-smith |

UPDATE

Live code: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!15/d5a1f/1

Just as my inkling, someone will give a scenario that is not in the question. So to make it work with empty middle name. Just add a nullif for empty string:

select first_name || coalesce('-' || nullif(middle_name,'') , '') || '-' || last_name 
from t;

Output:

|        ?column? |
|-----------------|
|      john-smith |
|      obi-kinobi |
| jane-anne-smith |
2
  • Try again: with cte as ( Select 'Luke' as FirstName, 'Jedi' as MiddleName, 'Master' as lastName from dual UNion all Select 'Darth' as FirstName, 'IamYourFather' as MiddleName, 'Vader' as lastName from dual UNion all Select 'Wierd' as FirstName, 'VaderSomeDaylater' as MiddleName, 'Yankovick' as lastName from dual UNION ALL Select 'Obi' as FirstName, '' as MiddleName, 'Wankanobi' as lastName from dual Union all Select 'Michael' as FirstName, 'NoSoupForYou' as MiddleName, 'Buen' as lastName from dual ) select firstname || coalesce('-' || middlename, '') || '-' || lastname from cte;
    – xQbert
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:43
  • PostgreSQL style empty string handling Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:47
1

One solution could be using case statement

select case Middlename is not null then (Firstname || '-' || Middlename || '-' || Surname) 
    else (Firstname || '-' || Surname) end AS example_column
from ....
1

This may be a viable option:

SELECT FirstName || '-' || ISNULL(MiddleName + '-', '') || Surname

Since a NULL concatenated with a string yields a NULL, we can attempt to build our sub-string and replace a NULL with an empty string, which is then concatenated to the next part of the name.

This assumes that FirstName and Surname are always NOT NULL, but you could apply the same logic to then as well.

3
  • If your RDBMS does not have an ISNULL construct, it probably has a COALESCE, which works similarly.
    – Shoeless
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:46
  • Doesn't work when Middlename contains an empty string
    – Stavr00
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:10
  • Alas, you are correct, but there was no mention of an empty string in the original question (see @Michael Buen's response to the same situation).
    – Shoeless
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 19:24
1

In case anyone is looking for SQL Server (MSSQL) this worked for me:

SELECT ([Firstname] + '-' + COALESCE([Middlename]+'-', '') + [Surname])
AS example_column 
FROM example_table

If you also want to skip the empty string (as I did) add a NULLIF:

SELECT ([Firstname] + '-' + COALESCE(NULLIF([Middlename]+'-', '-'),'') + [Surname])
AS example_column 
FROM example_table
0

You can use CASE statement

select Firstname 
      || case when Middlename <> '' Then '-'||Middlename  else '' END 
      || case when Surname<> '' Then '-'||Surname else '' END

As per your sample data I have check for empty string. To check NULL use Middlename IS NOT NULL instead of Middlename <> ''

0
  • The NULLIF expression reduces blank Middlename to NULL
  • Concatenating '-' with a NULL will always return NULL
  • TheVALUE expression replaces NULLs with an empty string

_

SELECT Firstname || VALUE( '-' || NULLIF('Middlename',''),'') || '-' || Surname'  
       AS example_column
FROM example_table
3
  • same as my answer some 21 minutes ago, except you use VALUE instead of COALESCE Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:02
  • Which DBMS supports that value() function?
    – user330315
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 18:46
  • I was assuming DB2. But the solution can be adapted COALESCE(), ISNULL() are alternate functions for other engines.
    – Stavr00
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 20:19
0

You could use REPLACE (if Oracle)

SELECT
   REPLACE(Firstname || '-' || Middlename || '-' || Surname,'--','-') 
   AS example_column
FROM example_table;

Warning: I've assumed there is no valid name with - as first or last character.


For downvoter

OP clearly said that:

SELECT (Firstname || '-' || Middlename || '-' || Surname)  AS example_column
FROM example_table

This will display Firstname-Middlename-Surname e.g.

John--Smith

So:

  1. Middlename is blank: '' this solution works in SQLite/PostgreSQL/Oracle
  2. Middlename is NULL and OP probably uses Oracle

Although Oracle treats zero-length character strings as nulls, concatenating a zero-length character string with another operand always results in the other operand, so null can result only from the concatenation of two null strings.

|| concatentaion operator:

 -- PostgreSQL/SQLite
 SELECT 'sth' || NULL
 -- NULL


 -- Oracle
 SELECT 'sth' || NULL
 -- sth
2
  • Note this assumes Oracle NULL string = '' operation. Commented May 19, 2016 at 17:41
  • For downvoter please leave a comment, why this solution is invalid. Commented May 20, 2016 at 8:13

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