52

I want django to authenticate users via email, not via usernames. One way can be providing email value as username value, but I dont want that. Reason being, I've a url /profile/<username>/, hence I cannot have a url /profile/abcd@gmail.com/.

Another reason being that all emails are unique, but it happen sometimes that the username is already being taken. Hence I'm auto-creating the username as fullName_ID.

How can I just change let Django authenticate with email?

This is how I create a user.

username = `abcd28`
user_email = `abcd@gmail.com`
user = User.objects.create_user(username, user_email, user_pass)

This is how I login.

email = request.POST['email']
password = request.POST['password']
username = User.objects.get(email=email.lower()).username
user = authenticate(username=username, password=password)
login(request, user)

Is there any other of of login apart from getting the username first?

10 Answers 10

75

You should write a custom authentication backend. Something like this will work:

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
from django.contrib.auth.backends import ModelBackend

class EmailBackend(ModelBackend):
    def authenticate(self, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        UserModel = get_user_model()
        try:
            user = UserModel.objects.get(email=username)
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            return None
        else:
            if user.check_password(password):
                return user
        return None

Then, set that backend as your auth backend in your settings:

AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = ['path.to.auth.module.EmailBackend']

Updated. Inherit from ModelBackend as it implements methods like get_user() already.

  • Error in code: UserMode.DoesNotExist – cyberbudy Sep 26 '16 at 14:31
  • 6
    Using django 1.9.8 I've got an error: 'EmailBackend' object has no attribute 'get_user'. Solved by adding 'get_user' method according to this stackoverflow.com/a/13954358/2647009 – baltasvejas Nov 14 '16 at 9:28
  • Please specify for which Django version this code can work. Some are complaining about the get_user method missing. – Dr. Younes Henni Nov 13 '17 at 19:18
  • 2
    Rather than just if user.check_password(password): you probably want to include what Django does by default via ModelBackend: if user.check_password(password) and self.user_can_authenticate(user): in order to check that the user has is_active=True. – jmq Jan 20 '18 at 17:54
  • Isn't this vulnerable to a timing attack as it doesn't include the Django mitigation on the source code? – Gabriel Garcia Aug 4 at 19:18
29

If you’re starting a new project, django highly recommended you to set up a custom user model. (see https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/topics/auth/customizing/#using-a-custom-user-model-when-starting-a-project)

and if you did it, add three lines to your user model:

class MyUser(AbstractUser):
    USERNAME_FIELD = 'email'
    email = models.EmailField(_('email address'), unique=True) # changes email to unique and blank to false
    REQUIRED_FIELDS = [] # removes email from REQUIRED_FIELDS

Then authenticate(email=email, password=password) works, while authenticate(username=username, password=password) stops working.

  • 1
    When running createsuperuser, this itself throws an error: TypeError: create_superuser() missing 1 required positional argument: 'username'. You need to use custom user manager: class MyUserManager(BaseUserManager): def create_superuser(self, email, password, **kwargs): user = self.model(email=email, is_staff=True, is_superuser=True, **kwargs) user.set_password(password) user.save() return user – Michal Holub Jun 20 '17 at 6:55
  • 10
    Complete instructions here: fomfus.com/articles/… – user2061057 Oct 27 '17 at 12:04
  • Then again, the Django docs advise against using a custom user model if you are creating a reusable app. – djvg Jan 9 at 12:58
9

I had a similar requirement where either username/email should work for the username field.In case someone is looking for the authentication backend way of doing this,check out the following working code.You can change the queryset if you desire only the email.

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model  # gets the user_model django  default or your own custom
from django.contrib.auth.backends import ModelBackend
from django.db.models import Q


# Class to permit the athentication using email or username
class CustomBackend(ModelBackend):  # requires to define two functions authenticate and get_user

    def authenticate(self, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        UserModel = get_user_model()

        try:
            # below line gives query set,you can change the queryset as per your requirement
            user = UserModel.objects.filter(
                Q(username__iexact=username) |
                Q(email__iexact=username)
            ).distinct()

        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            return None

        if user.exists():
            ''' get the user object from the underlying query set,
            there will only be one object since username and email
            should be unique fields in your models.'''
            user_obj = user.first()
            if user_obj.check_password(password):
                return user_obj
            return None
        else:
            return None

    def get_user(self, user_id):
        UserModel = get_user_model()
        try:
            return UserModel.objects.get(pk=user_id)
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            return None

Also add AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = ( 'path.to.CustomBackend', ) in settings.py

4

Django 2.x

As mentioned by Ganesh above for django 2.x the authenticate method now requires a request param.

# backends.py
from django.contrib.auth import backends, get_user_model
from django.db.models import Q
UserModel = get_user_model()


class ModelBackend(backends.ModelBackend):

    def authenticate(self, request, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        if username is None:
            username = kwargs.get(UserModel.USERNAME_FIELD)
        try:
            # user = UserModel._default_manager.get_by_natural_key(username)
            # You can customise what the given username is checked against, here I compare to both username and email fields of the User model
            user = UserModel.objects.get(Q(username__iexact=username) | Q(email__iexact=username))
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            # Run the default password hasher once to reduce the timing
            # difference between an existing and a nonexistent user (#20760).
            UserModel().set_password(password)
        else:
            if user.check_password(password) and self.user_can_authenticate(user):
                return user
        return super().authenticate(request, username, password, **kwargs)

add your backend to your project settings

# settings.py
AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = ['path.to.ModelBackend']

Your custom User model will need to make emails unique for active and validated users you can do this simply with something like this:

from django.contrib.auth.models import AbstractUser


class User(AbstractUser):
    objects = UserManager()
    email = models.EmailField(_('email address'), unique=True)

    class Meta:
        verbose_name = _('user')
        verbose_name_plural = _('users')
        db_table = 'auth_user'
        swappable = 'AUTH_USER_MODEL'

But to prevent someone blocking someone else from using their email you should add email validation instead and have your registration and login process take into account that emails may not be unique (and probably prevent new users using an existing and validated email address).

2

You should customize ModelBackend class. My simple code:

from django.contrib.auth.backends import ModelBackend
from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model

class YourBackend(ModelBackend):

  def authenticate(self, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
    UserModel = get_user_model()
    if username is None:
        username = kwargs.get(UserModel.USERNAME_FIELD)
    try:
        if '@' in username:
            UserModel.USERNAME_FIELD = 'email'
        else:
            UserModel.USERNAME_FIELD = 'username'

        user = UserModel._default_manager.get_by_natural_key(username)
    except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
        UserModel().set_password(password)
    else:
        if user.check_password(password) and self.user_can_authenticate(user):
            return user

And in settings.py file, add:

AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = ['path.to.class.YourBackend']
  • Update your code to include request parameter in authenticate method for django 2.1.1 – Ganesh Sep 16 '18 at 4:30
2

Email and Username Authentication for Django 2.X

Having in mind that this is a common question, here's a custom implementation mimicking the Django source code but that authenticates the user with either username or email, case-insensitively, keeping the timing attack protection and not authenticating inactive users.

from django.contrib.auth.backends import ModelBackend, UserModel
from django.db.models import Q

class CustomBackend(ModelBackend):
    def authenticate(self, request, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        try:
            user = UserModel.objects.get(Q(username__iexact=username) | Q(email__iexact=username))
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            UserModel().set_password(password)
        else:
            if user.check_password(password) and self.user_can_authenticate(user):
                return user

    def get_user(self, user_id):
        try:
            user = UserModel.objects.get(pk=user_id)
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            return None

        return user if self.user_can_authenticate(user) else None

Always remember to add it your settings.py the correct Authentication Backend.

1
from django.contrib.auth.models import User

from django.db import Q

class EmailAuthenticate(object):

    def authenticate(self, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        try:
            user = User.objects.get(Q(email=username) | Q(username=username))
        except User.DoesNotExist:
            return None
        except MultipleObjectsReturned:
            return User.objects.filter(email=username).order_by('id').first()

        if user.check_password(password):
            return user
        return None

    def get_user(self,user_id):
        try:
            return User.objects.get(pk=user_id)
        except User.DoesNotExist:
            return None

And then in settings.py:

AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = (
  'articles.backends.EmailAuthenticate',
)

where articles is my django-app, backends.py is the python file inside my app and EmailAuthenticate is the authentication backend class inside my backends.py file

0

For Django 2

username = get_object_or_404(User, email=data["email"]).username
        user = authenticate(
            request, 
            username = username, 
            password = data["password"]
        )
        login(request, user)
0

Authentication with Email and Username For Django 2.x

from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
from django.contrib.auth.backends import ModelBackend
from django.db.models import Q

class EmailorUsernameModelBackend(ModelBackend):
    def authenticate(self, request, username=None, password=None, **kwargs):
        UserModel = get_user_model()
        try:
            user = UserModel.objects.get(Q(username__iexact=username) | Q(email__iexact=username))
        except UserModel.DoesNotExist:
            return None
        else:
            if user.check_password(password):
                return user
        return None

In settings.py, add following line,

AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = ['appname.filename.EmailorUsernameModelBackend']
0

Authentication with Email For Django 2.x

def admin_login(request):
if request.method == "POST":
    email = request.POST.get('email', None)
    password = request.POST.get('password', None)
    try:
        get_user_name = CustomUser.objects.get(email=email)
        user_logged_in =authenticate(username=get_user_name,password=password)
        if user_logged_in is not None:
            login(request, user_logged_in)
            messages.success(request, f"WelcomeBack{user_logged_in.username}")
            return HttpResponseRedirect(reverse('backend'))
        else:
            messages.error(request, 'Invalid Credentials')
            return HttpResponseRedirect(reverse('admin_login'))
    except:
        messages.warning(request, 'Wrong Email')
        return HttpResponseRedirect(reverse('admin_login'))

else:
    if request.user.is_authenticated:
        return HttpResponseRedirect(reverse('backend'))
    return render(request, 'login_panel/login.html')
  • Can you add a bit of text to explain what your answer does and how it helps answer the question? – Jaquez Aug 19 at 4:51
  • Edited . Thanks – Shakil Ahmmed Aug 21 at 5:29

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