170

This is a common problem but I'm not sure how to solve it. The code below works fine.

var mind = time % (60 * 60);
var minutes = Math.floor(mind / 60);

var secd = mind % 60;
var seconds = Math.ceil(secd);

However, when I get to 1 hour or 3600 seconds it returns 0 minutes and 0 seconds. How can I avoid this so it returns all the minutes?

Thanks

  • Thats because when time = 3600, 3600%3600 is always 0...so everything else will be 0 according to your calculation. – MSI Sep 17 '10 at 6:59

25 Answers 25

338
3

To get the number of full minutes, divide the number of total seconds by 60 (60 seconds/minute):

var minutes = Math.floor(time / 60);

And to get the remaining seconds, multiply the full minutes with 60 and subtract from the total seconds:

var seconds = time - minutes * 60;

Now if you also want to get the full hours too, divide the number of total seconds by 3600 (60 minutes/hour · 60 seconds/minute) first, then calculate the remaining seconds:

var hours = Math.floor(time / 3600);
time = time - hours * 3600;

Then you calculate the full minutes and remaining seconds.

Bonus:

Use the following code to pretty-print the time (suggested by Dru)

function str_pad_left(string,pad,length) {
    return (new Array(length+1).join(pad)+string).slice(-length);
}

var finalTime = str_pad_left(minutes,'0',2)+':'+str_pad_left(seconds,'0',2);
| improve this answer | |
  • 57
    It's a bit cleaner to get remaining seconds by doing 'var seconds = time % 60'. – Edward D'Souza Dec 8 '11 at 15:20
  • 11
    @Radio add leading zeros using function str_pad_left(string,pad,length){ return (new Array(length+1).join(pad)+string).slice(-length); } var finalTime = str_pad_left(minutes,'0',2)+':'+str_pad_left(seconds,'0',2); – Dru Dec 6 '12 at 7:20
  • 1
    This solution won't work for negative values of time. If you for instance input -1 seconds, you get -1minute and 59 seconds back... – Pylinux Oct 20 '13 at 18:10
  • 5
    What's the sense of having negative time? Logically a time difference is always positive – mcont Dec 29 '14 at 19:08
  • 4
    You can use modulus to get the number of seconds, it's more readable in my opinion. var seconds = time % 60 – JCM Jun 10 '16 at 19:27
105
0

Another fancy solution:

function fancyTimeFormat(duration)
{   
    // Hours, minutes and seconds
    var hrs = ~~(duration / 3600);
    var mins = ~~((duration % 3600) / 60);
    var secs = ~~duration % 60;

    // Output like "1:01" or "4:03:59" or "123:03:59"
    var ret = "";

    if (hrs > 0) {
        ret += "" + hrs + ":" + (mins < 10 ? "0" : "");
    }

    ret += "" + mins + ":" + (secs < 10 ? "0" : "");
    ret += "" + secs;
    return ret;
}

~~ is a shorthand for Math.floor, see this link for more info

Try online

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    What's the meaning of ~~? – mcont Dec 29 '14 at 19:03
  • 9
    It's a basic shorhand for Math.floor, see this link. – lapin May 20 '15 at 11:10
  • Its work fine..... :) You can round the value like this way hrs = hrs.toFixed(0); mins = mins.toFixed(0); secs = secs.toFixed(0); – Abdul Khaliq Jun 25 '15 at 7:50
  • 1
    Thanks for this solution! I added time = math.round(time) to the first line to give me rounded seconds. – fotoflo Feb 6 '18 at 0:53
  • This is the more correct solution. As stated above, the solution with the most votes on this page displays 180 seconds as 2m60s. – SongBox Oct 19 '19 at 10:35
71
0

For people dropping in hoping for a quick simple and thus short solution to format seconds into M:SS :

function fmtMSS(s){return(s-(s%=60))/60+(9<s?':':':0')+s}

done..
The function accepts either a Number (preferred) or a String (2 conversion 'penalties' which you can halve by prepending + in the function call's argument for s as in: fmtMSS(+strSeconds)), representing positive integer seconds s as argument.

Examples:

fmtMSS(    0 );  //   0:00
fmtMSS(   '8');  //   0:08
fmtMSS(    9 );  //   0:09
fmtMSS(  '10');  //   0:10
fmtMSS(   59 );  //   0:59
fmtMSS( +'60');  //   1:00
fmtMSS(   69 );  //   1:09
fmtMSS( 3599 );  //  59:59
fmtMSS('3600');  //  60:00
fmtMSS('3661');  //  61:01
fmtMSS( 7425 );  // 123:45

Breakdown:

function fmtMSS(s){   // accepts seconds as Number or String. Returns m:ss
  return( s -         // take value s and subtract (will try to convert String to Number)
          ( s %= 60 ) // the new value of s, now holding the remainder of s divided by 60 
                      // (will also try to convert String to Number)
        ) / 60 + (    // and divide the resulting Number by 60 
                      // (can never result in a fractional value = no need for rounding)
                      // to which we concatenate a String (converts the Number to String)
                      // who's reference is chosen by the conditional operator:
          9 < s       // if    seconds is larger than 9
          ? ':'       // then  we don't need to prepend a zero
          : ':0'      // else  we do need to prepend a zero
        ) + s ;       // and we add Number s to the string (converting it to String as well)
}

Note: Negative range could be added by prepending (0>s?(s=-s,'-'):'')+ to the return expression (actually, (0>s?(s=-s,'-'):0)+ would work as well).

| improve this answer | |
  • I'd suggest adding Math.floor(s) to the last line for cleaner results. Working great anyway, thanks! – Diego Fortes Apr 26 '19 at 15:44
  • @PossessWithin: No, you should NOT "add Math.floor(s) to the last line" (of the breakdown-snippet) for multiple reasons, foremost because that would introduce a bug for values between 9 and 10 without further modifications; if you entered for example 69.25 then the output would be 1:9 instead of 1:09 ! This function (for which I explicitly specified integer seconds) is intended and lovingly crafted as high-perf crunching tool/'engine' (not ninja-golfed for size) and as such I consider it in-apropriate to burden that engine with unneeded verification/cleanup/filtering ... – GitaarLAB Jun 24 '19 at 0:00
  • ... work (like NaN, +/-Infinity etc.) and rounding-options which should be done by the programmer, prior to calling the function, based on the specific needs and possible input-values that the application can encounter! Naturally you are free to patch it in if your domain knowledge about expected input-values dictates that your particular use-case almost always receives floating point values and perf-testing indicates that your application. In your case where you wish to patch in only flooring of positive values you MUST .... – GitaarLAB Jun 24 '19 at 0:02
  • ... modify (9<s?':':':0') to (10>s?':0':':') (adding 1 char but 'sacrificing' 5 out of 6 true-paths to false-paths) OR (10<=s?':':':0') (adding 2 chars but maintaining 5 out of 6 true paths). Then I advise to change that final trailing +s to +(s|0) instead of Math.floor(s), as to not destroy the beauty of not needing to resolve and call Math.floor while still operating correctly over the entire 53bit +/-MAX_SAFE_INTEGER range instead of 'just' 32bit (unsigned) or 31bit (signed) range! Note that ABS(s) magnetude is guaranteed to be smaller than 60, so the signed... – GitaarLAB Jun 24 '19 at 0:03
  • ... signed bitwise OR is safe. Also note that this particular modification without flooring the remaining seconds would make the function output fractional seconds without trailing fractional zeroes, but will often have more than 3 significant non-zero frational digits which you'd probably need to handle as well. Finally, when combined with the optional pre-fix code for negative range, this particular modification would effectively TRUNCate the seconds (not FLOORing them). PS: PFFT, whoever came up with just 512 char limit for any meaningful comment should be... – GitaarLAB Jun 24 '19 at 0:04
21
0

You can also use native Date object:

var date = new Date(null);
date.setSeconds(timeInSeconds);

// retrieve time ignoring the browser timezone - returns hh:mm:ss
var utc = date.toUTCString();
// negative start index in substr does not work in IE 8 and earlier
var time = utc.substr(utc.indexOf(':') - 2, 8)

// retrieve each value individually - returns h:m:s
var time = date.getUTCHours() + ':' + date.getUTCMinutes() + ':' +  date.getUTCSeconds();

// does not work in IE8 and below - returns hh:mm:ss
var time = date.toISOString().substr(11, 8);

// not recommended - only if seconds number includes timezone difference
var time = date.toTimeString().substr(0, 8);

Of course this solution works only for timeInSeconds less than 24 hours ;)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Hadn't thought of letting the Date object handle the formatting. Less flexible, but if you want hh:mm:ss (or a subsection of that) this is great – MartinAnsty May 2 '12 at 21:51
  • I tried this with 25 seconds and it returned 01:00:25 which equates to 1 hour and 25 seconds. – timstermatic Aug 19 '13 at 12:32
  • Yes, probably because of your timezone. I have updated the solution to handle this case. – hamczu Aug 21 '13 at 11:45
  • date could also be constructed as var date = new Date(timeInSeconds * 1000) – Nuno André Nov 25 '17 at 9:27
20
0

2019 best variant

Format hh:mm:ss

console.log(display(60 * 60 * 2.5 + 25)) // 2.5 hours + 25 seconds

function display (seconds) {
  const format = val => `0${Math.floor(val)}`.slice(-2)
  const hours = seconds / 3600
  const minutes = (seconds % 3600) / 60

  return [hours, minutes, seconds % 60].map(format).join(':')
}

| improve this answer | |
  • hmmm, seconds is const. you can't reassign it. – ronapelbaum Apr 28 '19 at 13:15
  • @ronapelbaum this argument, not constant, I do not understand what you mean – Илья Зеленько Jun 1 '19 at 12:45
  • @ronapelbaum if you assign the seconds instead of getting them as parameter you have to use let, e.g. function display (state) { let seconds = state.seconds; ... } was that maybe where your error came from? – retrovertigo Jun 24 '19 at 4:15
  • A function param should be treated as const. When you use %= you're re-assigning this param. Just use seconds%60 – ronapelbaum Jul 2 '19 at 17:34
16
0
function secondsToMinutes(time){
    return Math.floor(time / 60)+':'+Math.floor(time % 60);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This can be improved with zero padding the seconds: function secondsToMinutes(time){ return Math.floor(0 / 60)+':'+('0'+Math.floor(0 % 60)).slice(-2); } – Kus Dec 7 '17 at 6:00
  • nice! thank you @Kus. Just you might want to replace those two 0s with time, am I correct? – mikey Feb 19 '18 at 23:20
  • 2
    @mikey oops! Yes, function secondsToMinutes(time){ return Math.floor(time / 60) + ':' + ('0' + Math.floor(time % 60)).slice(-2) } – Kus Feb 21 '18 at 22:38
12
0

To add leading zeros, I would just do:

var minutes = "0" + Math.floor(time / 60);
var seconds = "0" + (time - minutes * 60);
return minutes.substr(-2) + ":" + seconds.substr(-2);

Nice and short

| improve this answer | |
9
0

Clean one liner using ES6


const secondsToMinutes = seconds => Math.floor(seconds / 60) + ':' + ('0' + Math.floor(seconds % 60)).slice(-2);

| improve this answer | |
6
0

A one liner (doesnt work with hours):

 function sectostr(time) {
    return ~~(time / 60) + ":" + (time % 60 < 10 ? "0" : "") + time % 60;
 }
| improve this answer | |
4
0

Seconds to h:mm:ss

var hours = Math.floor(time / 3600);
time -= hours * 3600;

var minutes = Math.floor(time / 60);
time -= minutes * 60;

var seconds = parseInt(time % 60, 10);

console.log(hours + ':' + (minutes < 10 ? '0' + minutes : minutes) + ':' + (seconds < 10 ? '0' + seconds : seconds));
| improve this answer | |
  • Can someone explain minutes < 10 ? '0' + minutes : minutes for me, assuming only basic js knowledge? – Zediiiii Apr 16 '19 at 14:23
  • If minutes are single digit (<10) prepend leading zero else not. – kayz1 Apr 16 '19 at 14:37
  • That helps! I didn't realize that "?" was the ternary operator in js. – Zediiiii Apr 16 '19 at 15:23
4
0

The Following function will help you to get Days , Hours , Minutes , seconds

toDDHHMMSS(inputSeconds){
        const Days = Math.floor( inputSeconds / (60 * 60 * 24) );
        const Hour = Math.floor((inputSeconds % (60 * 60 * 24)) / (60 * 60));
        const Minutes = Math.floor(((inputSeconds % (60 * 60 * 24)) % (60 * 60)) / 60 );
        const Seconds = Math.floor(((inputSeconds % (60 * 60 * 24)) % (60 * 60)) % 60 );
        let ddhhmmss  = '';
        if (Days > 0){
            ddhhmmss += Days + ' Day ';
        }
        if (Hour > 0){
            ddhhmmss += Hour + ' Hour ';
        }

        if (Minutes > 0){
            ddhhmmss += Minutes + ' Minutes ';
        }

        if (Seconds > 0){
            ddhhmmss += Seconds + ' Seconds ';
        }
        return ddhhmmss;
    }
alert( toDDHHMMSS(2000));
| improve this answer | |
  • I like this one. I changed if (Days > 0){ ddhhmmss += Days + ' Day '; } to if (Days > 0) {ddhhmmss += Days === 1 ? Days + ' Day ' : Days + ' Days '}; to say 1 Day, 2 Days, 3 Days etc. Similar can be done for the others. – Ste May 21 at 20:07
4
0

After all this, yet another simple solution:

const time = new Date(null);
time.setSeconds(7530);
console.log(time.getHours(), time.getMinutes(), time.getSeconds());
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Using time.setSeconds(1); returns 1 0 1 when it should be 0 0 1. – Ste May 21 at 19:30
3
0

Another but much more elegant solution for this is as follows:

/**
 * Convert number secs to display time
 *
 * 65 input becomes 01:05.
 *
 * @param Number inputSeconds Seconds input.
 */
export const toMMSS = inputSeconds => {
    const secs = parseInt( inputSeconds, 10 );
    let minutes = Math.floor( secs / 60 );
    let seconds = secs - minutes * 60;

    if ( 10 > minutes ) {
        minutes = '0' + minutes;
    }
    if ( 10 > seconds ) {
        seconds = '0' + seconds;
    }

    // Return display.
    return minutes + ':' + seconds;
};
| improve this answer | |
2
0

For adding zeros I really don't see the need to have a full other function where you can simply use for example

var mins=Math.floor(StrTime/60);
var secs=StrTime-mins * 60;
var hrs=Math.floor(StrTime / 3600);
RoundTime.innerHTML=(hrs>9?hrs:"0"+hrs) + ":" + (mins>9?mins:"0"+mins) + ":" + (secs>9?secs:"0"+secs);

Its why we have conditional statements in the first place.

(condition?if true:if false) so if example seconds is more than 9 than just show seconds else add a string 0 before it.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

try this : Converting Second to HOURS, MIN and SEC.

function convertTime(sec) {
    var hours = Math.floor(sec/3600);
    (hours >= 1) ? sec = sec - (hours*3600) : hours = '00';
    var min = Math.floor(sec/60);
    (min >= 1) ? sec = sec - (min*60) : min = '00';
    (sec < 1) ? sec='00' : void 0;

    (min.toString().length == 1) ? min = '0'+min : void 0;    
    (sec.toString().length == 1) ? sec = '0'+sec : void 0;    

    return hours+':'+min+':'+sec;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

var seconds = 60;
var measuredTime = new Date(null);
measuredTime.setSeconds(seconds); // specify value of SECONDS
var Time = measuredTime.toISOString().substr(11, 8);
document.getElementById("id1").value = Time;
<div class="form-group">
  <label for="course" class="col-md-4">Time</label>
  <div class="col-md-8">
    <input type="text" class="form-control" id="id1" name="field">Min
  </div>
</div>

| improve this answer | |
2
0

If you are using Moment.js then you can use there built in Duration object

const duration = moment.duration(4825, 'seconds');

const h = duration.hours(); // 1
const m = duration.minutes(); // 20
const s = duration.seconds(); // 25
| improve this answer | |
2
0

2020 UPDATE

Using basic math and simple javascript this can be done in just a few lines of code.

EXAMPLE - Convert 7735 seconds to HH:MM:SS.


MATH:

Calculations use:

  1. Math.floor() - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Math/floor

The Math.floor() function returns the largest integer less than or equal to a given number.

  1. % arithmetic operator (Remainder) - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Arithmetic_Operators#Remainder

The remainder operator returns the remainder left over when one operand is divided by a second operand. It always takes the sign of the dividend.

Check out code below. Seconds are divided by 3600 to get number of hours and a remainder, which is used to calculate number of minutes and seconds.

HOURS => 7735 / 3600 = 2 remainder 535

MINUTES => 535 / 60 = 8 remainder 55

SECONDS => 55


LEADING ZEROS:

Many answers here use complicated methods to show number of hours, minutes and seconds in a proper way with leading zero - 45, 04 etc. This can be done using padStart(). This works for strings so the number must be converted to string using toString().

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/padStart

The padStart() method pads the current string with another string (multiple times, if needed) until the resulting string reaches the given length. The padding is applied from the start of the current string.


CODE:

function secondsToTime(e){
    var h = Math.floor(e / 3600).toString().padStart(2,'0'),
        m = Math.floor(e % 3600 / 60).toString().padStart(2,'0'),
        s = Math.floor(e % 60).toString().padStart(2,'0');
    
    return h + ':' + m + ':' + s;
}

console.log(secondsToTime(7735));  //02:08:55

/*
secondsToTime(SECONDS) => HH:MM:SS 

secondsToTime(8)       => 00:00:08 
secondsToTime(68)      => 00:01:08
secondsToTime(1768)    => 00:29:28
secondsToTime(3600)    => 01:00:00
secondsToTime(5296)    => 01:28:16
secondsToTime(7735)    => 02:08:55
secondsToTime(45296)   => 12:34:56
secondsToTime(145296)  => 40:21:36
secondsToTime(1145296) => 318:08:16
*/

| improve this answer | |
1
0

You've done enough code to track minutes and seconds portions of time.

What you could do is add the hours factor in:

var hrd = time % (60 * 60 * 60);
var hours = Math.floor(hrd / 60);

var mind = hrd % 60;
var minutes = Math.floor(mind / 60);

var secd = mind % 60;
var seconds = Math.ceil(secd);

var moreminutes = minutes + hours * 60

This would give you what you need also.

| improve this answer | |
  • I tried this using "time" as seconds and it didn't work. For example, 975 sec means hrd = 975, which means hours is 16. – Spedge Sep 11 '13 at 10:28
1
0

I was thinking of a faster way to get this done and this is what i came up with

var sec = parseInt(time);
var min=0;
while(sec>59){ sec-=60; min++;}

If we want to convert "time" to minutes and seconds, for example:

// time = 75,3 sec
var sec = parseInt(time); //sec = 75
var min=0;
while(sec>59){ sec-=60; min++;} //sec = 15; min = 1
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Put my two cents in :

function convertSecondsToMinutesAndSeconds(seconds){
            var minutes;
            var seconds;
            minutes = Math.floor(seconds/60);
            seconds = seconds%60;

            return [minutes, seconds];
        }

So this :

var minutesAndSeconds = convertSecondsToMinutesAndSeconds(101);

Will have the following output :

[1,41];

Then you can print it like so :

console.log('TIME : ' +  minutesSeconds[0] + ' minutes, ' + minutesSeconds[1] + ' seconds');

//TIME : 1 minutes, 41 seconds
| improve this answer | |
1
0

strftime.js (strftime github) is one of the best time formatting libraries. It's extremely light - 30KB - and effective. Using it you can convert seconds into time easily in one line of code, relying mostly on the native Date class.

When creating a new Date, each optional argument is positional as follows:

new Date(year, month, day, hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds);

So if you initialize a new Date with all arguments as zero up to the seconds, you'll get:

var seconds = 150;
var date = new Date(0,0,0,0,0,seconds);
=> Sun Dec 31 1899 00:02:30 GMT-0500 (EST)

You can see that 150 seconds is 2-minutes and 30-seconds, as seen in the date created. Then using an strftime format ("%M:%S" for "MM:SS"), it will output your minutes' string.

var mm_ss_str = strftime("%M:%S", date);
=> "02:30"

In one line, it would look like:

var mm_ss_str = strftime('%M:%S', new Date(0,0,0,0,0,seconds));
=> "02:30"

Plus this would allow you to interchangeable support HH:MM:SS and MM:SS based on the number of seconds. For example:

# Less than an Hour (seconds < 3600)
var seconds = 2435;
strftime((seconds >= 3600 ? '%H:%M:%S' : '%M:%S'), new Date(0,0,0,0,0,seconds));
=> "40:35"

# More than an Hour (seconds >= 3600)
var seconds = 10050;
strftime((seconds >= 3600 ? '%H:%M:%S' : '%M:%S'), new Date(0,0,0,0,0,seconds));
=> "02:47:30"

And of course, you can simply pass whatever format you want to strftime if you want the time string to be more or less semantic.

var format = 'Honey, you said you\'d be read in %S seconds %M minutes ago!';
strftime(format, new Date(0,0,0,0,0,1210));
=> "Honey, you said you'd be read in 10 seconds 20 minutes ago!"

Hope this helps.

| improve this answer | |
1
0
export function TrainingTime(props) {
    const {train_time } = props;
    const hours = Math.floor(train_time/3600);
    const minutes = Math.floor((train_time-hours * 3600) / 60);
    const seconds = Math.floor((train_time%60));

    return `${hours} hrs  ${minutes} min  ${seconds} sec`;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

I suggest another solution:

function formatTime(nbSeconds, hasHours) {
    var time = [],
        s = 1;
    var calc = nbSeconds;

    if (hasHours) {
        s = 3600;
        calc = calc / s;
        time.push(format(Math.floor(calc)));//hour
    }

    calc = ((calc - (time[time.length-1] || 0)) * s) / 60;
    time.push(format(Math.floor(calc)));//minute

    calc = (calc - (time[time.length-1])) * 60;
    time.push(format(Math.round(calc)));//second


    function format(n) {//it makes "0X"/"00"/"XX"
        return (("" + n) / 10).toFixed(1).replace(".", "");
    }

    //if (!hasHours) time.shift();//you can set only "min: sec"

    return time.join(":");
};
console.log(formatTime(3500));//58:20
console.log(formatTime(305));//05:05
console.log(formatTime(75609, true));//21:00:09
console.log(formatTime(0, true));//00:00:00

| improve this answer | |
0
0

I know it has been solved in many ways. I needed this function for an After Effects script, where speed or namespace pollution is not an issue. I drop it here for someone that needs something similar. I also wrote some tests and worked fine. So here's the code:

Number.prototype.asTime = function () {
    var hour = Math.floor(this / 3600),
        min = Math.floor((this - hour * 3600) / 60),
        sec = this - hour * 3600 - min * 60,
        hourStr, minStr, secStr;
    if(hour){
        hourStr = hour.toString(),
        minStr = min < 9 ? "0" + min.toString() : min.toString();
        secStr = sec < 9 ? "0" + sec.toString() : sec.toString();
        return hourStr + ":" + minStr + ":" + secStr + "hrs";
    }
    if(min){
        minStr = min.toString();
        secStr = sec < 9 ? "0" + sec.toString() : sec.toString();
        return  minStr + ":" + secStr + "min";
    }
    return sec.toString() + "sec";
}
| improve this answer | |

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