68

I wonder if there is an easy way to format Strings of dict-outputs such as this:

{
  'planet' : {
    'name' : 'Earth',
    'has' : {
      'plants' : 'yes',
      'animals' : 'yes',
      'cryptonite' : 'no'
    }
  }
}

..., where a simple str(dict) just would give you a quite unreadable ...

{'planet' : {'has': {'plants': 'yes', 'animals': 'yes', 'cryptonite': 'no'}, 'name': 'Earth'}}

For as much as I know about Python I would have to write a lot of code with many special cases and string.replace() calls, where this problem itself does not look so much like a 1000-lines-problem.

Please suggest the easiest way to format any dict according to this shape.

109

Depending on what you're doing with the output, one option is to use JSON for the display.

import json
x = {'planet' : {'has': {'plants': 'yes', 'animals': 'yes', 'cryptonite': 'no'}, 'name': 'Earth'}}

print json.dumps(x, indent=2)

Output:

{
  "planet": {
    "has": {
      "plants": "yes", 
      "animals": "yes", 
      "cryptonite": "no"
    }, 
    "name": "Earth"
  }
}

The caveat to this approach is that some things are not serializable by JSON. Some extra code would be required if the dict contained non-serializable items like classes or functions.

4
  • I would like to give you more then one up for this response. Just awesome! Thanks, man!
    – erikbstack
    Sep 18 '10 at 10:40
  • 3
    it doesn't work if one of the values is a Date object for example
    – archmage
    Jan 31 '12 at 0:08
  • How about the None object? It would be converted to null. You would convert those null objects to None manually.
    – Ryan Chou
    Oct 30 '17 at 2:31
  • I don't think this should be an acceptable answer because while json.dumps serialzies the dict, not all ptyhon objects are json serializable and the resulting string lacks proper formatting (as of this writting) Sep 5 '19 at 19:43
40

Use pprint

import pprint

x  = {
  'planet' : {
    'name' : 'Earth',
    'has' : {
      'plants' : 'yes',
      'animals' : 'yes',
      'cryptonite' : 'no'
    }
  }
}
pp = pprint.PrettyPrinter(indent=4)
pp.pprint(x)

This outputs

{   'planet': {   'has': {   'animals': 'yes',
                             'cryptonite': 'no',
                             'plants': 'yes'},
                  'name': 'Earth'}}

Play around with pprint formatting and you can get the desired result.

1
  • 1
    Well, it has only depth, width and indent as parameters. I don't see a way to make planet go to the next line. Sure, PP results are better readable, but the newline+appropriate_spaces is nessesary for my case. But thanks for showing me this nice package. Comes in very handy in other cases.
    – erikbstack
    Sep 17 '10 at 9:10
6
def format(d, tab=0):
    s = ['{\n']
    for k,v in d.items():
        if isinstance(v, dict):
            v = format(v, tab+1)
        else:
            v = repr(v)

        s.append('%s%r: %s,\n' % ('  '*tab, k, v))
    s.append('%s}' % ('  '*tab))
    return ''.join(s)

print format({'has': {'plants': 'yes', 'animals': 'yes', 'cryptonite': 'no'}, 'name': 'Earth'}})

Output:

{
'planet': {
  'has': {
    'plants': 'yes',
    'animals': 'yes',
    'cryptonite': 'no',
    },
  'name': 'Earth',
  },
}

Note that I'm sorta assuming all keys are strings, or at least pretty objects here

2
  • 1
    Works as expected. Anyway, I hope that somebody might find a all-batteries-included solution. If there is nothing else after the weekend, I use your solution. Thanks for your help!
    – erikbstack
    Sep 17 '10 at 9:14
  • Falls to infinite recursion on self-including dicts. Dec 26 '16 at 13:51

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