10

Is there in C# some kind of equivalent of ExpectedSystemExit in Java? I have an exit in my code and would really like to be able to test it. The only thing I found in C# is a not really nice workaround.

Example Code

public void CheckRights()
{
    if(!service.UserHasRights())
    {
         Environment.Exit(1);
    }
}

Test Code

[TestMethod]
public void TestCheckRightsWithoutRights()
{
    MyService service = ...
    service.UserHasRights().Returns(false);

    ???
}

I am using the VS framework for testing (+ NSubstitute for mocking) but it is not a problem to switch to nunit or whatever for this test.

8
  • 1
    Which unit testing framework are you using?
    – Gimly
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 7:47
  • 3
    Heva you experienced ever that Environment.Exit() not worked? Its jut works.
    – csa
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 7:52
  • 1
    I am using the VS framework (+ NSubstitute for mocking) but it is not a problem to switch to nunit or whatever for this test. Of course, the exit works, I need to test that it is called under some condition. @LasseV.Karlsen, I don't really understand what you mean. When the application exits, them even the test is not executed to the end.
    – Antiohia
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 8:08
  • 2
    What I mean is that you would create an interface, IApplicationLifetimeManagement, with a Terminate method. You would inject this interface into whatever you're testing. As part of the test you would mock up a dummy of that interface, inject that dummy into the code you're testing, and then afterwards verify that the Terminate method was called. Obviously, the dummy implementation of that method would not call Environment.Exit. You could use NSubstitute or similar to do this mocking. Commented May 20, 2016 at 8:37
  • 1
    And obviously, the names I chose was just examples. Commented May 20, 2016 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

13

You should use dependency injection to supply to the class being tested an interface that provides an environmental exit.

For example:

public interface IEnvironment
{
    void Exit(int code);
}

Let's also assume that you have an interface for calling UserHasRights():

public interface IRightsService
{
    bool UserHasRights();
}

Now suppose your class to be tested looks like this:

public sealed class RightsChecker
{
    readonly IRightsService service;
    readonly IEnvironment environment;

    public RightsChecker(IRightsService service, IEnvironment environment)
    {
        this.service     = service;
        this.environment = environment;
    }

    public void CheckRights()
    {
        if (!service.UserHasRights())
        {
            environment.Exit(1);
        }
    }
}

Now you can use a mocking framework to check that IEnvironment .Exit() is called under the right conditions. For example, using Moq it might look a bit like this:

[TestMethod]
public static void CheckRights_exits_program_when_user_has_no_rights()
{
    var rightsService = new Mock<IRightsService>();
    rightsService.Setup(foo => foo.UserHasRights()).Returns(false);

    var enviromnent = new Mock<IEnvironment>();

    var rightsChecker = new RightsChecker(rightsService.Object, enviromnent.Object);

    rightsChecker.CheckRights();

    enviromnent.Verify(foo => foo.Exit(1));
}

Ambient contexts and cross-cutting concerns

A method such as Environment.Exit() could be considered to be a cross-cutting concern, and you might well want to avoid passing around an interface for it because you can end up with an explosion of additional constructor parameters. (Note: The canonical example of a cross cutting concern is DateTime.Now.)

To address this issue, you can introduce an "Ambient context" - a pattern which allows you to use a static method while still retaining the ability to unit test calls to it. Of course, such things should be used sparingly and only for true cross-cutting concerns.

For example, you could introduce an ambient context for Environment like so:

public abstract class EnvironmentControl
{
    public static EnvironmentControl Current
    {
        get
        {
            return _current;
        }

        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(value));

            _current = value;
        }
    }

    public abstract void Exit(int value);

    public static void ResetToDefault()
    {
        _current = DefaultEnvironmentControl.Instance;
    }

    static EnvironmentControl _current = DefaultEnvironmentControl.Instance;
}

public class DefaultEnvironmentControl : EnvironmentControl
{
    public override void Exit(int value)
    {
        Environment.Exit(value);
    }

    public static DefaultEnvironmentControl Instance => _instance.Value;

    static readonly Lazy<DefaultEnvironmentControl> _instance = new Lazy<DefaultEnvironmentControl>(() => new DefaultEnvironmentControl());
}

Normal code just calls EnvironmentControl.Current.Exit(). With this change, the IEnvironment parameter disappears from the RightsChecker class:

public sealed class RightsChecker
{
    readonly IRightsService service;

    public RightsChecker(IRightsService service)
    {
        this.service = service;
    }

    public void CheckRights()
    {
        if (!service.UserHasRights())
        {
            EnvironmentControl.Current.Exit(1);
        }
    }
}

But we still retain the ability to unit-test that it has been called:

public static void CheckRights_exits_program_when_user_has_no_rights()
{
    var rightsService = new Mock<IRightsService>();
    rightsService.Setup(foo => foo.UserHasRights()).Returns(false);

    var enviromnent = new Mock<EnvironmentControl>();
    EnvironmentControl.Current = enviromnent.Object;

    try
    {
        var rightsChecker = new RightsChecker(rightsService.Object);
        rightsChecker.CheckRights();
        enviromnent.Verify(foo => foo.Exit(1));
    }

    finally
    {
        EnvironmentControl.ResetToDefault();
    }
}

For more information about ambient contexts, see here.

4
  • Thank you... but that is the same workaround that I simply don't like. Is there really no equivalent of the JUnit rule that I could use in my tests without creating additional classes/interfaces/methods in my productive code?
    – Antiohia
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 9:00
  • 1
    @Antiohia I shall add to this answer the common solution to cross-cutting concerns such as this, which at least means that you don't need to pass additional interfaces around. You cannot do this kind of thing without creating additional classes in C#, but for true cross-cutting concerns (such as security, environmental control and current date time) you can minimise the impact by introducing ambient contexts. Commented May 20, 2016 at 9:07
  • Thank you! I will think about it.
    – Antiohia
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 9:52
  • Running several tests in parallel using this idea may interfere each other, because the same static ambient is shared by all instances. There is an alternative, also "non invasive" solution using shims for static members, within a context, as exposed by the Pose library.
    – JotaBe
    Commented Feb 1 at 8:59
4

I ended up creating a new method which I can then mock in my tests.

Code

public void CheckRights()
{
    if(!service.UserHasRights())
    {
         Environment.Exit(1);
    }
}

internal virtual void Exit() 
{
    Environment.Exit(1);
}

Unit test

[TestMethod]
public void TestCheckRightsWithoutRights()
{
    MyService service = ...
    service.When(svc => svc.Exit()).DoNotCallBase();
    ...
    service.CheckRights();
    service.Received(1).Exit();
}
0

If your goal is to avoid extra classes/interfaces just to support tests, how do you feel about Environment.Exit action via Property Injection?

class RightsChecker
{
    public Action AccessDeniedAction { get; set; }

    public RightsChecker(...)
    {
        ...
        AccessDeniedAction = () => Environment.Exit();
    }
}

[Test]
public TestCheckRightsWithoutRights()
{
    ...
    bool wasAccessDeniedActionExecuted = false;
    rightsChecker.AccessDeniedAction = () => { wasAccessDeniedActionExecuted = true; }
    ...
    Assert.That(wasAccessDeniedActionExecuted , Is.True);
}

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