5

I'm looking to get n random bytes as a bytearray or bytes, as os.urandom does.

However I need to be able to set a random seed so the value is reproducable.

def urandom_from_random(rng, length):
    return bytes([rng.randint(0, 255) for i in range(length)])

import random
rng = random.Random(42)
data = urandom_from_random(rng, 120)
print(data)

The script above works, but isn't very efficient.

Is there a more direct way to do this besides creating many ints and converting them to bytes?


Note:

  • Making urandom return predictable results is possible on Linux, but needs root access.

3 Answers 3

3

I think the closest function in random to what you want is getrandbits. It returns an integer with the requested number of bits. If you want to turn that into a bytes instance, you can use int.to_bytes.

Here's a quick function that pairs those two together:

def urandom_from_random(rng, length):
    if length == 0:
        return b''
    integer = rng.getrandbits(length * 8)
    result = integer.to_bytes(length, sys.byteorder)
    return result

The byte order you specify to to_bytes shouldn't matter. I tell it to use the system's native byte order, but I don't actually know if that makes it any faster than it would be otherwise.

12
  • 1
    random.getrandbits() uses "little endian" internally to combine 32-bit words generated by the Mersenne Twister algorithm (MT19937). I don't know whether it has any effect on anything
    – jfs
    May 20, 2016 at 23:23
  • 2
    This is limited by the maximum size of an int, with large values it raises an exception OverflowError: signed integer is greater than maximum.
    – ideasman42
    May 20, 2016 at 23:33
  • 1
    How many bytes do you need to request to get that exception? Python's int type is variably sized, so it should just work regardless of the sizes involved. I tested with length values up to ten thousand with no issues. Are you running my actual code, or some variation? Are you sure you haven't introduced any errors? The exception you mention is what int.to_bytes will raise if you give it a too-short byte length for the int value you've called it on.
    – Blckknght
    May 21, 2016 at 0:01
  • 2
    In this case, the issue is how the C code for getrandbits handles the size argument. It parses the number of bits into an ordinary C int, which on my 64-bit system is still just 32 bits. I've just tested out a patch for the implementation that makes it use a ssigned_t type instead, and that does indeed allow much larger values. Indeed, it allows values much larger than I have memory to actually handle (so I get MemoryErrors instead of OverflowErrors for some values).
    – Blckknght
    May 21, 2016 at 1:35
  • 3
    I've reported this as a (minor) bug to the Python core developers: bugs.python.org/issue27072 Since it's probably an issue only for Windows 64-bit builds (where int and size_t have different sizes), and only when requesting a really silly amount of random data, I'm not sure how high a priority it will be.
    – Blckknght
    May 21, 2016 at 6:09
2

This is a modified version of @Blckknght's answer that takes into account the internal INT_MAX limit in getrandbits.

def urandom_from_random(rng, length):
    if length == 0:
        return b''

    import sys
    chunk_size = 65535
    chunks = []
    while length >= chunk_size:
        chunks.append(rng.getrandbits(
                chunk_size * 8).to_bytes(chunk_size, sys.byteorder))
        length -= chunk_size
    if length:
        chunks.append(rng.getrandbits(
                length * 8).to_bytes(length, sys.byteorder))
    result = b''.join(chunks)
    return result

Example use:

import random 
rng = random.Random(42)
print(len(urandom_from_random(rng, 300000000)))
1

Use the seed in the begining of your code :

import random
random.seed(7)
rng = random.Random(42)
data = urandom_from_random(rng, 120)

As long as you use 7 in the seed you have the same random pick. Then you can change it to any value.

1
  • random.seed(7) isn't needed. The script works predictably as-is, clarified my question.
    – ideasman42
    May 20, 2016 at 22:37

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