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I'm working on a project which emulates a scientific calculator using the reversed polish notation. My litterals, such as "1", "1.23","2/3", etc. are stored in a stack with their types. For instance "1" will be stored as an Integer, "1.23" as a Double, etc, using my types (I defined Double, Integer, etc for various reasons).

class Litteral {
  public:
     virtual QString toString () const = 0;
};

I want to do as follows : when the user enters an operator, such as +, I need to pop() twice on my stack, execute the operation, and push(). I already have done the recognization of the operators. When the user types +, I execute a given algorithm. My problem is that when the + is recognized and the two pop() are done, I need to really execute + and I need to create an object of the correct type. For instance if I had an Integer and a Double, I'd have to :

Litteral* l = new Double(pop1+pop2);

But if I had two Integers, I'd have to :

Litteral* l = new Integer(pop1 + pop2);

Etc... I could use a large amount of 'if' to execute the correct "new XXXX()", but I feel like this isn't a good solution. I also thought about using a template method, using to execute the corresponding algorithm, but I'd have to create as many versions of this function as there are possible combinations. It is still humanly possible, but again, it doesn't feel clean. Is there any clean way to do that ?

Thanks

Edit : For instance, when I pop 2 Integers, I want to execute a given operation. The result of this operation must be an Integer. But the result is not always an Integer, it depends of the things I pop'd. If it was an Integer and a Double, the result would have been a Double. So the type of the 'new' I have to do depends of the things I pop'd. And I don't want to implement that with a switch/ multiples 'if'. I don't want to do that :

if ((typeid(*q1) == typeid(Integer)) && (typeid(*q2) == typeid(Double)))  { //...}

Edit 2:

Literal& pop1 = stack.top(); 
stack.pop(); 
Literal& pop2 = stack.top(); 
stack.pop(); 
Literal& toAdd = (*pop1.clone() + *pop2.clone()); 

Error : no match for 'operator+' (operand types are 'Literal' and 'Literal')

Classes :

class Literal { 
    public: virtual QString toString () const = 0; 
      virtual int getValue() const = 0; 
      virtual Litteral * clone() const = 0; 
      virtual Litteral& operator+(const Integer& l) = 0; 
}; 

class Integer: public Literal { 
    friend class LitteralManager; 
    int value; 
    public: 
      Integer(int v) :value(v) {} 
      Integer(const Entier& e) { value = e.getValue(); }; 
      virtual QString toString () const; 
      int getValue() const { return value; } 
      virtual Entier& operator+(const Entier& e);
      Entier * clone() const; 
};
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  • pop1 and pop2 in your example are instances of either Double or Integer, right? If so, how is their operator+ defined? Can't you just make it return the appropriate type and not have to new when using it at all? – sepp2k May 22 '16 at 15:01
  • .. as Integer, "1.23" as a Double, etc. Please do expand on etc. How many types in total do you expect to have? – n. 1.8e9-where's-my-share m. May 22 '16 at 16:01
  • I'll have 7 types of Litterals. – Chuck May 22 '16 at 16:08
  • I was trying to define operator+, but the thing is that when I pop from my stack, everything I get is a Litteral, I lose the true type. So if I try to do : pop1+pop2, it's trying to find operator+(const Litteral& l1,constLitteral&l2), which doesn't exist. If it did, I could have use new XXXgiven the operator+ I'd be in. – Chuck May 22 '16 at 16:18
  • @Chuck But if that doesn't exist, how can your code work at all? I mean even if you get around the "which class do I new issue", new WhatEver(pop1 + pop2) can't compile if there's no operator+ defined for pop1 and pop2. – sepp2k May 22 '16 at 16:29
0
#include <cassert>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

struct Double;
struct Integer;

struct Literal {
    virtual Literal* operator + (const Literal&) const = 0;
    virtual Literal* operator + (const Double&)  const = 0;
    virtual Literal* operator + (const Integer&) const = 0;};

struct Double : Literal {
    Literal* operator + (const Literal& rhs) const {
        return rhs + *this;}

    Literal* operator + (const Double& rhs) const {
        return new Double;}

    Literal* operator + (const Integer& rhs) const {
        return new Double;}};

struct Integer : Literal {
    Literal* operator + (const Literal& rhs) const {
        return rhs + *this;}

    Literal* operator + (const Double& rhs) const {
        return new Double;}

    Literal* operator + (const Integer& rhs) const {
        return new Integer;}};

int main () {
    {
    Literal* p = new Double;
    Literal* q = new Double;
    Literal* r = *p + *q;
    assert(typeid(*r) == typeid(Double));
    }

    {
    Literal* p = new Double;
    Literal* q = new Integer;
    Literal* r = *p + *q;
    assert(typeid(*r) == typeid(Double));
    }

    {
    Literal* p = new Integer;
    Literal* q = new Double;
    Literal* r = *p + *q;
    assert(typeid(*r) == typeid(Double));
    }

    {
    Literal* p = new Integer;
    Literal* q = new Integer;
    Literal* r = *p + *q;
    assert(typeid(*r) == typeid(Integer));
    }

    return 0;}
3
  • Missed the whole thing about this solution. My bad. It works perfectly. Thanks ! – Chuck May 26 '16 at 14:26
  • You're very welcome. I'm so glad it fit what you needed. That pattern is called double dispatch. Still far from ideal. Doesn't scale well. Is it too crass to ask for you to upvote the answer? :-) – Glenn Downing May 27 '16 at 18:22
  • Sure, no problem ! – Chuck May 28 '16 at 18:38
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#include <cassert>
#include <stack>

using namespace std;

struct Literal {
    virtual Literal* clone () const = 0;};

struct Double : Literal {
    Double* clone () const {
        return new Double(*this);}};

struct Integer : Literal {
    Integer* clone () const {
        return new Integer(*this);}};

int main () {
    stack<Literal*> x;

    x.push(new Double());
    x.push(new Integer());

    Literal* p = x.top();    // the Integer
    x.pop();
    Literal* q = p->clone(); // create a new Integer

    assert(typeid(*q) == typeid(Integer));

    return 0;}
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  • First, thank you for your answer. But I don't see how the factory is helping me here. I probably didn't explain my problem properly. I've edited my post to make it more clear. – Chuck May 22 '16 at 14:52
  • There's no obvious way to know that Double should be preferred over Integer. I was mis-assuming that the type of the first poped object should dictate the result, but I now see what you're trying to do. Take a look at how iterator traits work. They form a hierarchy that lets algorithms choose the most appropriate implementation. – Glenn Downing May 22 '16 at 16:15
0

Here's a possible solution:

#include <exception>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <memory>

class Literal {
public:
  virtual ~Literal() = default;
};

class Double : public Literal {
public:
  Double(double val) : m_val(val) { }
  Double(const Double&) = default;
  Double(Double&&) = default;
  ~Double() = default;

  double value() const { return m_val; }

private:
  double m_val;
};

class Integer : public Literal {
public:
  Integer(int val) : m_val(val) { }
  Integer(const Integer&) = default;
  Integer(Integer&&) = default;
  ~Integer() = default;

  int value() const { return m_val; }

private:
  int m_val;
};

template <typename T> struct make_literal_result;
template <> struct make_literal_result<int> {
  using type = Integer;
};
template<> struct make_literal_result<double> {
  using type = Double;
};
template <typename T>
using make_literal_result_t = typename make_literal_result<T>::type;

template <typename T> std::unique_ptr<make_literal_result_t<T>> make_literal(T x) {
  return std::make_unique<make_literal_result_t<T>>(x);
}

template <typename Res, typename Fn>
Res dynamic_apply(Fn f, const Literal* val) {
  auto vald = dynamic_cast<const Double*>(val);
  if (vald != nullptr)
    return f(vald->value());
  auto vali = dynamic_cast<const Integer*>(val);
  if (vali != nullptr)
    return f(vali->value());
  throw std::invalid_argument("Invalid type");
}

std::unique_ptr<Literal> dynamic_plus(const Literal* x, const Literal* y) {
  auto curried_plus = [](auto val1) -> std::function<std::unique_ptr<Literal>(const Literal*)> {
    return [val1](const Literal* y) -> std::unique_ptr<Literal> {
      return dynamic_apply<std::unique_ptr<Literal>>([val1](auto val2) {
        return make_literal(val1 + val2);
      }, y);
    };
  };
  auto plus_x = dynamic_apply<std::function<std::unique_ptr<Literal>(const Literal*)>>(curried_plus, x);
  return plus_x(y);
}

int main() {
  Double x { 2.5 };
  Integer y { 3 };
  auto sum = dynamic_plus(&x, &y);
  auto sum_Double = dynamic_cast<Double*>(sum.get());
  assert(sum_Double != nullptr);
  std::cout << "sum is: " << sum_Double->value() << '\n';
  return 0;
}

The general idea of dynamic_plus is: the result stored in plus_x is a function taking const Literal* and returning std::unique_ptr<Literal>, whose body uses dynamic_apply on a generic lambda to do its work. To construct plus_x, in turn, is another application of make_literal to a higher-level function. (Then, we also need to do some type erasure using std::function in order to have some common type for that dynamic_apply to return.)

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  • Thanks for answering. I started to look into another solution, but if it does not work, I'll come back to your post. Thanks again for taking time to answer! – Chuck May 25 '16 at 23:42

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