19

The following is a simple template partial specialization:

// #1
template <typename T, T n1, T n2>
struct foo { 
    static const char* scenario() {
        return "#1 the base template";
    }
};

// #2
// partial specialization where T is unknown and n1 == n2
template <typename T, T a>
struct foo<T, a, a> { 
    static const char* scenario() {
        return "#2 partial specialization";
    }
};

The main below gets different results on g++ (6.1) and clang++ (3.8.0):

extern const char HELLO[] = "hello";
double d = 2.3;

int main() {
    cout <<   foo<int, 1, 2>                    ::scenario() << endl;                   
    cout <<   foo<int, 2, 2>                    ::scenario() << endl;                   
    cout <<   foo<long, 3, 3>                   ::scenario() << endl;                  
    cout <<   foo<double&, d, d>                ::scenario() << endl;               
    cout <<   foo<double*, &d, &d>              ::scenario() << endl;             
    cout <<   foo<double*, nullptr, nullptr>    ::scenario() << endl;   
    cout <<   foo<int*, nullptr, nullptr>       ::scenario() << endl;      
    cout <<   foo<nullptr_t, nullptr, nullptr>  ::scenario() << endl; 
    cout <<   foo<const char*, HELLO, HELLO>    ::scenario() << endl;
}

results on g++ and clang

# | The code | g++ (6.1) | clang++ (3.8.0) |
1 | foo<int, 1, 2> | #1 as expected | #1 as expected |
2 | foo<int, 2, 2> | #2 as expected | #2 as expected |
3 | foo<long, 3, 3> | #2 as expected | #2 as expected |
4 | foo<double&, d, d> | #1 -- why? | #2 as expected |
5 | foo<double*, &d, &d> | #2 as expected | #2 as expected |
6 | foo<double*, nullptr, nullptr> | #2 as expected | #1 -- why? |
7 | foo<int*, nullptr, nullptr> | #2 as expected | #1 -- why? |
8 | foo<nullptr_t, nullptr, nullptr> | #2 as expected | #1 -- why? |
9 | foo<const char*, HELLO, HELLO> | #2 as expected | #2 as expected |

Which one is right?

Code: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/45ba16c9f021fd84

  • I'm with you. Both compilers fails in their respective cases. clang is right for #4, gcc is right for #6, #7, and #8. – Sam Varshavchik May 21 '16 at 23:48
  • There are many quirks related to function specialization; see Why Not Specialize Function Templates?. – Eissa N. May 21 '16 at 23:52
  • 1
    @EissaN, note that this is a specialization for a struct, not a function. Though I agree this is indeed in the quirk zone... – Amir Kirsh May 21 '16 at 23:54
  • 1
    MSVC produces all the expected results as a matter of fact. – DeiDei May 21 '16 at 23:56
  • 1
    EDG in C++14 strict mode also selects the partial specialization as expected. – bogdan May 22 '16 at 1:13
1

I think in clang nullptr is more like in-build variable like the in-build type int. nullptr actually has no type. The declaration (there is no definition) of nullptr_t is struct nullptr_t nullptr_t;. And the answer for the question one which is right... the answer is that both are right because there is standard but these are different compilers made from different companies so there can be differences between GNU G++ and Clang. Clang was supposed to be fully compatible with G++ but it is not.

  • Actually in MS VS 2015 with Clang it does not generate errors in the compiler's output. But at runtime you can see that it uses the base template. As I mentioned in the answernullptr has no type. – K. Mihaylov Dec 7 '16 at 15:45
-1

#4 is ill-formed, I'm surprised it compiles. For one thing, a double can't be used as a non-type template parameter. For another thing, a class template uses the same rules as function templates for partial ordering. The standard provides an example of the "imaginary" functions generated to perform the ordering:

template<int I, int J, class T> class X { };
template<int I, int J> class X<I, J, int> { }; // #1
template<int I>        class X<I, I, int> { }; // #2
template<int I, int J> void f(X<I, J, int>); // A
template<int I>        void f(X<I, I, int>); // B

For your example, it would look something like this:

template <typename T, T n1, T n2>
struct foo { 
};

template <typename T, T n1, T n2>
void bar(foo<T, n1, n2>)
{
    std::cout << "a";
}

template <typename T, T a>
void bar(foo<T, a, a>)
{
    std::cout << "b";
}

Template argument deduction is used to determine which function is more specialized than the other. A double& should be deduced as a double and so both specializations should be equal, aka ambiguous for bar(foo<double&, d, d>{});. Lo and behold GCC and Clang complain:

GCC error

main.cpp:14:6: note: template argument deduction/substitution failed: main.cpp:26:29: note: mismatched types 'double&' and 'double'

 bar(foo<double&, d, d>{});
                         ^

Clang error

note: candidate template ignored: substitution failure [with T = double &]: deduced non-type template argument does not have the same type as the its corresponding template parameter ('double' vs 'double &')

And again, if you remove the reference, they both correctly complain about using double as a non-type template parameter.

I'm not going to test the rest, but you may find similar results.

  • 6
    "For one thing, a double can't be used as a non-type template parameter." But an lvalue reference to double can. – T.C. May 22 '16 at 2:00
  • 2
    ...and the deduction failures you are complaining about is caused by a defect in the standard. – T.C. May 22 '16 at 2:08
  • The second thing makes sense: "the same reference" is only usually exposed as "the pointers are the same". The OP seems to want this "same" to work with template pattern matching, which seems philosophically excessive. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 22 '16 at 2:28

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