7

Hard refreshes on my SPA React/Firebase application does not maintain auth state on immediate execution of a function. I have a workaround, but it's sketchy.

My react routes utilize the onEnter function to determine whether or not the user is authenticated or not. For instance

<Route path="/secure" component={Dashboard} onEnter={requireAuth}/>

Furthermore, my requireAuth function looks like this:

function (nextState, replace) {
        console.log('requireAuth', firebase.auth().currentUser);
        if (!firebase.auth().currentUser) {
            console.log('attempting to access a secure route. please login first.');
            replace({
                pathname: '/login',
                state: { nextPathname: nextState.location.pathname }
            });
        }
};

However, on a hard refresh there is a slight delay on firebase.auth().currentUser. It's null at first, then executes a POST to firebase servers in order to determine auth state. When it returns the currentUser object is populated. This delay causes issues though.

My hacky solution is the following: update: this doesn't actually work...

function (nextState, replace) {
    setTimeout(function () {
        console.log('requireAuth', firebase.auth().currentUser);
        if (!firebase.auth().currentUser) {
            console.log('attempting to access a secure route. please login first.');
            replace({
                pathname: '/login',
                state: { nextPathname: nextState.location.pathname }
            });
        }
    }, 50);
};

Simply wrap it in a timeout. However, I really don't like this... any thoughts?

Update:

I have also tried to wrap it within a onAuthStateChanged listener, which should be more accurate than a setTimeout with a definitive time delay. Code as follows:

function (nextState, replace) {
    var unsubscribe = firebase.auth().onAuthStateChanged(function (user) {
        if (!user) {
            console.log('attempting to access a secure route');
            replace({
                pathname: '/login',
                state: { nextPathname: nextState.location.pathname }
            })
            console.log('should have called replace');
        }
        unsubscribe();
    });
    // setTimeout(function () {
    //     console.log('requireAuth', firebase.auth().currentUser);
    //     if (!firebase.auth().currentUser) {
    //         console.log('attempting to access a secure route. please login first.');
    //         replace({
    //             pathname: '/login',
    //             state: { nextPathname: nextState.location.pathname }
    //         });
    //     }
    // }, 50);
};

The two log statements are executed, but react-router replace does not seem to be executed correctly. Perhaps that's a different question for the react-router experts.

update 2:

It was late at night when I was working on this. Apparently setTimeout doesn't actually work either.

  • I think I just answered a similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/37370462/… – Frank van Puffelen May 22 '16 at 4:44
  • @FrankvanPuffelen I actually tried something like that. From within the requireAuth function wrapp the contents in firebase.auth().onAuthStateChanged(function (user) {...}); However, react-router's replace function doesn't seem to be doing anything when in that context. I'll update the question. – James Gilchrist May 22 '16 at 11:46
7

Okay. So, I was able to solve this by utilizing the localStorage variable that firebase provides to store the user information.

function (nextState, replace) {
    if (!firebase.auth().currentUser) {
        let hasLocalStorageUser = false;
        for (let key in localStorage) {
            if (key.startsWith("firebase:authUser:")) {
                hasLocalStorageUser = true;
            }
        }
        if (!hasLocalStorageUser) {
            console.log('Attempting to access a secure route. Please authenticate first.');
            replace({
                pathname: '/login',
                state: { nextPathname: nextState.location.pathname }
            });
        }
    }
};
  • What happens if I go to your website, open console and write localStorage.set("firebase:authUser:123123123", "123123")? – Arturs Vancans Apr 26 at 19:58
3

While this is a post related to ReactJS, I recently came across the same problem when writing my own authentication/authorisation service for AngularJS. On page refresh the onAuthStateChanged passes a user that is null because firebase is still initializing (asynchronously).

The only solution that worked for me was storing the users uid in localStorage after the user has logged in and deleting the value after the user has logged out.

Since i'm using a authService and userService seperately I registered a listener in the authService that is fired once the user is logged in/out.

Code sample authService (not the full authService):

var loginListeners = [];
var logoutListeners = [];

function addLoginListener(func) {
    loginListeners.push(func);
}

function addLogoutListener(func) {
    logoutListeners.push(func);
}

function login(email, password) {
    return firebase.auth().signInWithEmailAndPassword(email, password).then(function(user) {
        for(var i = 0; i < loginListeners.length; i++) {
            loginListeners[i](user); // call registered listeners for login
        }
    });
}

function logout() {
    return firebase.auth().signOut().then(function() {
        for(var i = 0; i < logoutListeners.length; i++) {
            logoutListeners[i](); // call registered listeners for logout
        }
    });
}

Code sample userService (not the full userService):

.provider('userService', ['authServiceProvider',
function UserService(authServiceProvider) {

var usersRefUrl = '/users';
var userInfo = null;
var userDetails = null;

// refreshHack auto-executed when this provider creates the service
var storageId = 'firebase:uid'; // storing uid local because onAuthStateChanged gives null (when async initializing firebase)
(function addRefreshHackListeners() {
    authServiceProvider.addLoginListener(function(user) {
        userInfo = user;
        localStorage.setItem(storageId, user.uid); // store the users uid after login so on refresh we have uid to retreive userDetails
    });
    authServiceProvider.addLogoutListener(function() {
        userInfo = null;
        localStorage.removeItem(storageId);
    });
    firebase.auth().onAuthStateChanged(function(user) {
        if(user) { // when not using refreshHack user is null until async initializing is done (and no uid is available).
            localStorage.setItem(storageId, user.uid);
            userInfo = user;
            resolveUserDetails();
        } else {
            localStorage.removeItem(storageId);
            userInfo = null;
            userDetails = null;
        }
    });
})();

function isLoggedIn() {
    return userInfo ? userInfo.uid : localStorage.getItem(storageId); // check localStorage for refreshHack
}

function resolveUserDetails() {
    var p = null;
    var uid = isLoggedIn();
    if(uid)
        p = firebase.database().ref(usersRefUrl + '/' + uid).once('value').then(function(snapshot) {
            userDetails = snapshot.val();
            return userDetails;
        }).catch(function(error) {
            userDetails = null;
        });

    return p; // resolve by returning a promise or null
}
}]);

And in a run-block you can globally register a user and resolve the user-info/details every route change (makes it more secure):

.run(['$rootScope', 'userService', 'authService',
function($rootScope, userService, authService) {

// make user available to $root in every view
$rootScope.user = userService.getUser();

$rootScope.$on('$routeChangeStart',
        function(event, next, current) {

    // make sure we can add resolvers for the next route
    if(next.$$route) {
        if(next.$$route.resolve == null)
            next.$$route.resolve = {};

        // resolve the current userDetails for every view
        var user = userService.resolveUserDetails();
        next.$$route.resolve.userDetails = function() {
            return user;
        }
    }
});
}]);

Maybe this can help someone who is struggling the same issue. Besides that feel free to optimize and discuss the code samples.

  • Why do you need to store the user if in a separate local storage variable? It's already there. Otherwise nice solution for angular. – James Gilchrist Jun 17 '16 at 11:15
  • It is just a matter of design choices. Offcourse you can save the entire user in localStorage but I don't like many references to the localStorage. In my solution a have specific user information(details) in a firebase reference like '/users' and this allows for listening to 'child_added' events or any other events that are pushed by firebase. If this feels like overhead to you in your situation you may choice a different approach. – Roald Koning Jun 17 '16 at 12:15
1

Works by managing localStorage. Here is example how I do it.

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);

    let authUser = null;

    // setting auth from localstorage
    for (let key in localStorage) {
      if (key === storageId) {
        authUser = {};
        break;
      }
    }

    this.state = {authUser};
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    firebase
      .auth
      .onAuthStateChanged(authUser => {

        if (authUser) {
          localStorage.setItem(storageId, authUser.uid);
        } else {
          localStorage.removeItem(storageId);
        }

        // change state depending on listener
        authUser
          ? this.setState({authUser})
          : this.setState({authUser: null});
      });
  }

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