168

I’m trying to add a property to express request object from a middleware using typescript. However I can’t figure out how to add extra properties to the object. I’d prefer to not use bracket notation if possible.

I’m looking for a solution that would allow me to write something similar to this (if possible):

app.use((req, res, next) => {
    req.property = setProperty(); 
    next();
});
2
  • you should be able to extend the request interface that the express.d.ts file provides with the fields you want. – toskv May 22 '16 at 19:17
  • I still can't get this to work. Typescript is soo frustrating – GN. Sep 17 '20 at 20:08

21 Answers 21

194

You want to create a custom definition, and use a feature in Typescript called Declaration Merging. This is commonly used, e.g. in method-override.

Create a file custom.d.ts and make sure to include it in your tsconfig.json's files-section if any. The contents can look as follows:

declare namespace Express {
   export interface Request {
      tenant?: string
   }
}

This will allow you to, at any point in your code, use something like this:

router.use((req, res, next) => {
    req.tenant = 'tenant-X'
    next()
})

router.get('/whichTenant', (req, res) => {
    res.status(200).send('This is your tenant: '+req.tenant)
})
8
  • 2
    I just did this, but I got it work without adding my custom.d.ts file to the files section in my tsconfig.json, yet it still works. Is this expected behavior? – Chaim Friedman May 17 '17 at 19:20
  • 1
    @ChaimFriedman Yes. The files section restricts the set of files included by TypeScript. If you don't specify files or include, then all *.d.ts are included by default, so there's no need to add your custom typings there. – interphx Jan 12 '18 at 8:02
  • 16
    Not working for me: I get Property 'tenant does not exist on type 'Request' ` Doesn't make a difference if I explicitly include it in tsconfig.json or not. UPDATE With declare global as @basarat pointet out in his answear works, but I had to do import {Request} from 'express' first. – Lion Feb 10 '18 at 19:24
  • 8
    FWIW, this answer is now obsolete. JCM's answer is the correct way to augment the Request object in expressjs (4.x at least) – Eric Liprandi Jul 25 '19 at 23:13
  • 3
    For future searches - a good example I found that worked out of the box: github.com/3mard/ts-node-example – jd291 Sep 19 '19 at 12:24
111

As suggested by the comments in the index.d.ts, you simply declare to the global Express namespace any new members. Example:

declare global {
  namespace Express {
    interface Request {
      context: Context
    }
  }
}

Full Example:

import * as express from 'express';

export class Context {
  constructor(public someContextVariable) {
  }

  log(message: string) {
    console.log(this.someContextVariable, { message });
  }
}

declare global {
  namespace Express {
    interface Request {
      context: Context
    }
  }
}

const app = express();

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  req.context = new Context(req.url);
  next();
});

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  req.context.log('about to return')
  res.send('hello world world');
});

app.listen(3000, () => console.log('Example app listening on port 3000!'))

Extending global namespaces is covered more at my GitBook.

7
  • Why is global needed in the declaration? What happens if its not there? – Jason Kuhrt Jan 27 '18 at 2:29
  • This works with interfaces, but in case anyone needs to merge types, note that types are "closed" and cannot be merged: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/… – Peter W Aug 15 '19 at 4:30
  • 1
    Mr @basarat I owe you some beers. – marcellsimon Feb 21 '20 at 22:46
  • I also had to add to my tsconfig.json: { "compilerOptions": { "typeRoots": ["./src/typings/", "./node_modules/@types"] }, "files": [ "./src/typings/express/index.d.ts" ] } – marcellsimon Feb 21 '20 at 23:15
  • None of the above solution worked.. but this one did the job in first run.. thanks a lot..!! – Ritesh May 23 '20 at 18:02
78

For newer versions of express, you need to augment the express-serve-static-core module.

This is needed because now the Express object comes from there: https://github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/blob/8fb0e959c2c7529b5fa4793a44b41b797ae671b9/types/express/index.d.ts#L19

Basically, use the following:

declare module 'express-serve-static-core' {
  interface Request {
    myField?: string
  }
  interface Response {
    myField?: string
  }
}
11
  • 2
    This worked for me, whereas extending the plain-old 'express' module did not. Thank you! – Ben Kreeger May 6 '19 at 4:15
  • 5
    Was struggling with this, in order to get this to work, I had to import the module as well: import {Express} from "express-serve-static-core"; – andre_b Aug 10 '19 at 17:44
  • 1
    @andre_b Thanks for the hint. I think that the import statement turns the file into a module, and this is the part that's necessary. I've switched to using export {} which also works. – Danyal Aytekin Aug 22 '19 at 20:48
  • 2
    Make sure the file this code goes in is not called express.d.ts, otherwise the compiler will try to merge this in to the express typings, resulting in errors. – Tom Spencer Oct 21 '19 at 15:46
  • 4
    Make sure your types must be first in typeRoots! types/express/index.d.ts and tsconfig => "typeRoots": ["./src/types", "./node_modules/@types"] – kaya Oct 23 '19 at 20:29
37

After trying 8 or so answers and not having a success. I finally managed to get it working with jd291's comment pointing to 3mards repo.

Create a file in the base called types/express/index.d.ts. And in it write:

declare namespace Express {
    interface Request {
        yourProperty: <YourType>;
    }
}

and include it in tsconfig.json with:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "typeRoots": ["./types"]
    }
}

Then yourProperty should be accessible under every request:

import express from 'express';

const app = express();

app.get('*', (req, res) => {
    req.yourProperty = 
});
0
32

The accepted answer (as the others) does not works for me but

declare module 'express' {
    interface Request {
        myProperty: string;
    }
}

did. Hope that will help someone.

4
  • 2
    Similar method is described in ts docs under "Module Augmentation". It's great if you don't want to use *.d.ts files and just store your types within regular *.ts files. – im.pankratov Oct 29 '18 at 19:26
  • 3
    this is the only thing that worked for me as well, all other answers seem to need to be in .d.ts files – parliament Dec 15 '18 at 2:58
  • 1
    This works for me as well, provided that I put my custom-declarations.d.ts file in the TypeScript's project root. – focorner Nov 27 '19 at 14:29
  • 1
    I extended the original type to preserve it: import { Request as IRequest } from 'express/index'; and interface Request extends IRequest. Also had to add the typeRoot – Ben Creasy Dec 7 '19 at 3:28
22

None of the offered solutions worked for me. I ended up simply extending the Request interface:

import {Request} from 'express';

export interface RequestCustom extends Request
{
    property: string;
}

Then to use it:

import {NextFunction, Response} from 'express';
import {RequestCustom} from 'RequestCustom';

someMiddleware(req: RequestCustom, res: Response, next: NextFunction): void
{
    req.property = '';
}

Edit: Recent versions of TypeScript complain about this. Instead, I had to do:

someMiddleware(expressRequest: Request, res: Response, next: NextFunction): void
{
    const req = expressRequest as RequestCustom;
    req.property = '';
}
5
  • 3
    that will work, but quite verbose if you have 100s of middleware functions, amirite – Alexander Mills Feb 28 '18 at 3:01
  • 1
    @user2473015 Yeah, recent versions of Typescript broke this. See my updated answer. – Tom Mettam Feb 25 '19 at 13:55
  • 1
    As of 1.10.2020, it seems like creating a new interface that extends the Response/Request interface from Express itself, should work totally fine. I have interface CustomResponse extends Response { customProperty: string} and where I call it someMiddleware(res: CustomResponse) and it works fine, with access to properties that exist both on Response and the newly defined interface. – Petar Oct 1 '20 at 15:02
  • Working as intended for me, thanks! – Maoration Jan 30 at 13:42
  • 1
    I prefer this method, its more explicit and clear than silently extending the request object somewhere behind the scenes. Makes it clear what properties are yours and what are from the source module – Paul Grimshaw Feb 14 at 7:30
12

All of these responses seem to be wrong or outdated in some way or another.

This worked for me in May, 2020:

in ${PROJECT_ROOT}/@types/express/index.d.ts:

import * as express from "express"

declare global {
    namespace Express {
        interface Request {
            my_custom_property: TheCustomType
        }
    }
}

in tsconfig.json, add / merge the property such that:

"typeRoots": [ "@types" ]

Cheers.

2
  • Works with Webpack + Docker, import* can be replaced with export {}; – Dooomel May 25 '20 at 21:44
  • Doesn't work. Property 'user' does not exist on type 'Request'. – Oliver Dixon Mar 17 at 12:53
9

While this is a very old question, I stumbled upon this problem lately.The accepted answer works okay but I needed to add a custom interface to Request - an interface I had been using in my code and that didn't work so well with the accepted answer. Logically, I tried this:

import ITenant from "../interfaces/ITenant";

declare namespace Express {
    export interface Request {
        tenant?: ITenant;
    }
}

But that didn't work because Typescript treats .d.ts files as global imports and when they have imports in them they are treated as normal modules. That is why the code above doesn't work on a standard typescript setting.

Here's what I ended up doing

// typings/common.d.ts

declare namespace Express {
    export interface Request {
        tenant?: import("../interfaces/ITenant").default;
    }
}
// interfaces/ITenant.ts

export interface ITenant {
    ...
}
6
  • This works for my main file, but not in my routing files or controllers, I get no linting, but when I try to compile it says "Property 'user' does not exist on type 'Request'." (I'm using user instead of tenant), but if I add // @ts-ignore above them, then it works (though that's a silly way to fix it of course. Do you have any thoughts on why it may not be working for my other files? – Logan Apr 2 '19 at 8:10
  • That is a very strange thing @Logan. Can you share your .d.ts, tsconfig.json and the use instance? Plus, what version of typescript are you using as this importing in global modules is only supported starting from TS 2.9? That could help better. – 16kb Apr 2 '19 at 15:22
  • I've uploaded data here, pastebin.com/0npmR1Zr I'm not sure why the highlighting is all messed up though This is from the main file prnt.sc/n6xsyl This is from another file prnt.sc/n6xtp0 Clearly some part of it understands what's going on, but the compiler does not. I'm using version 3.2.2 of typescript – Logan Apr 3 '19 at 13:38
  • 1
    Suprisingly, ... "include": [ "src/**/*" ] ... Works for me but "include": ["./src/", "./src/Types/*.d.ts"], doesn't. I haven't gone in dept in trying to understand this yet – 16kb Apr 4 '19 at 12:05
  • Importing interface by using dynamic imports works for me. Thanks – Roman Mahotskyi Mar 29 '20 at 3:01
8

In TypeScript, interfaces are open ended. That means you can add properties to them from anywhere just by redefining them.

Considering that you are using this express.d.ts file, you should be able to redefine the Request interface to add the extra field.

interface Request {
  property: string;
}

Then in your middleware function, the req parameter should have this property as well. You should be able to use it without any changes to your code.

7
  • 1
    How do you "share" that information throughout your code? If I define a property in Request, say Request.user = {}; in app.ts how does userController.ts know about it? – Nepoxx Aug 4 '16 at 13:41
  • 2
    @Nepoxx if you redefine an interface the compiler will merge the properties and make them visible everywhere, that's why. Ideally you'd do the redefinition in a .d.ts file. :) – toskv Aug 4 '16 at 13:43
  • That seems to work, however if I use the type express.Handler ( instead of manually specifying (req: express.Request, res: express.Response, next: express.NextFunction) => any)), it does not seem to refer to the same Request as it complains that my property does not exist. – Nepoxx Aug 4 '16 at 14:01
  • I wouldn't expect it to, unless express.Handler extends the Request interface. does it? – toskv Aug 4 '16 at 14:03
  • 2
    I can make that work if I use declare module "express" but not if I use declare namespace Express. I'd rather use the namespace syntax but it just doesn't work for me. – WillyC Dec 1 '16 at 21:28
4

If you are looking for solution that works with express4, here it is:

@types/express/index.d.ts: --------must be /index.d.ts

declare namespace Express { // must be namespace, and not declare module "Express" { 
  export interface Request {
    user: any;
  }
}

tsconfig.json:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "module": "commonjs",
    "target": "es2016",
    "typeRoots" : [
      "@types", // custom merged types must be first in a list
      "node_modules/@types",
    ]
  }
}

Ref from https://github.com/TypeStrong/ts-node/issues/715#issuecomment-526757308

3

Maybe this issue has been answered, but I want to share just a little, now sometimes an interface like other answers can be a little too restrictive, but we can actually maintain the required properties and then add any additional properties to be added by creating a key with a type of string with value type of any

import { Request, Response, NextFunction } from 'express'

interface IRequest extends Request {
  [key: string]: any
}

app.use( (req: IRequest, res: Response, next: NextFunction) => {
  req.property = setProperty();

  next();
});

So now, we can also add any additional property that we want to this object.

3

This is what worked for me when using Nestjs and Express. As on Nov 2020.

Create a file: ./@types/express-serve-static-core/index.d.ts

Note: must have exactly this path and file name. For Typescript declaration merging to work, the file name and its path must match the original declaration file and path.

import { UserModel } from "../../src/user/user.model";

declare global{
    namespace Express {
        interface Request {
            currentUser: UserModel
        }
    }
}

add this to your tsconfig.json

"typeRoots": [
      "@types",
      "./node_modules/@types",
    ]        
3

This is not actually answering to the question directly, but I'm offering an alternative. I was struggling with the same problem and tried out pretty much every interface extending solution on this page and none of them worked.

That made me stop to think: "Why am I actually modifying the request object?".

Express developers seem to have thought that users might want to add their own properties. That's why there is a locals object. The catch is, that it's not in the request but in the response object.

The response.locals object can contain any custom properties you might want to have, encapsulated in the request-response cycle, thus not exposed to other requests from different users.

Need to store an userId? Just set response.locals.userId = '123'. No need to struggle with the typings.

The downside of it is that you have to pass the response object around, but it's very likely that you are doing it already.

https://expressjs.com/en/api.html#res.locals

2
  • A more notable downside of this is that response.locals remains untyped. Any value stored in it is any. – Martti Laine Feb 14 at 10:19
  • That is very much true, but I'm happy to accept it as a trade off. – Timo Feb 15 at 11:11
2

To help anyone who is just looking for something else to try here is what worked for me in late May of 2020 when trying to extend ExpressJS' Request. I had to have tried more than a dozen things before getting this to work:

  • Flip the order of what everyone is recommending in the "typeRoots" of your tsconfig.json (and don't forget to drop the src pathing if you have a rootDir setting in tsconfig such as "./src"). Example:
"typeRoots": [
      "./node_modules/@types",
      "./your-custom-types-dir"
]
  • Example of custom extension ('./your-custom-types-dir/express/index.d.ts"). I had to use inline import and default exports to use classes as a type in my experience so that is shown too:
declare global {
  namespace Express {
    interface Request {
      customBasicProperty: string,
      customClassProperty: import("../path/to/CustomClass").default;
    }
  }
}
  • Update your nodemon.json file to add the "--files" command to ts-node, example:
{
  "restartable": "rs",
  "ignore": [".git", "node_modules/**/node_modules"],
  "verbose": true,
  "exec": "ts-node --files",
  "watch": ["src/"],
  "env": {
    "NODE_ENV": "development"
  },
  "ext": "js,json,ts"
}
2

on mac with node 12.19.0 and express 4, using Passport for auth, I needed to extend my Session object

similar as above, but slightly different:

import { Request } from "express";


declare global {
  namespace Express {
    export interface Session {
      passport: any;
      participantIds: any;
      uniqueId: string;
    }
    export interface Request {
      session: Session;
    }
  }
}

export interface Context {
  req: Request;
  user?: any;
}```
1

One possible solution is to use "double casting to any"

1- define an interface with your property

export interface MyRequest extends http.IncomingMessage {
     myProperty: string
}

2- double cast

app.use((req: http.IncomingMessage, res: http.ServerResponse, next: (err?: Error) => void) => {
    const myReq: MyRequest = req as any as MyRequest
    myReq.myProperty = setProperty()
    next()
})

The advantages of double casting are that:

  • typings is available
  • it does not pollute existing definitions but extends them, avoiding confusion
  • since the casting is explicit, it compiles fines with the -noImplicitany flag

Alternatively, there is the quick (untyped) route:

 req['myProperty'] = setProperty()

(do not edit existing definition files with your own properties - this is unmaintainable. If the definitions are wrong, open a pull request)

EDIT

See comment below, simple casting works in this case req as MyRequest

2
  • @akshay In this case, yes, because MyRequest extends the http.IncomingMessage. It it were not the case, double casting via any would be the only alternative – Bruno Grieder Jun 30 '16 at 12:50
  • It is recommended that you cast to unknown instead of any. – dev May 4 '20 at 13:51
1

This answer will be beneficial to those who rely on npm package ts-node.

I was also struggling with the same concern of extending request object, I followed a lot of answers in stack-overflow & ended with following the below-mentioned strategy.

I declared extended typing for express in the following directory. ${PROJECT_ROOT}/api/@types/express/index.d.ts

declare namespace Express {
  interface Request {
    decoded?: any;
  }
}

then updating my tsconfig.json to something like this.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
     "typeRoots": ["api/@types", "node_modules/@types"]
      ...
  }
}

even after doing the above steps, the visual studio stopped complaining, but unfortunately, the ts-node compiler still used to throw.

 Property 'decoded' does not exist on type 'Request'.

Apparently, the ts-node was not able to locate the extended type definitions for request object.

Eventually after spending hours, as I knew the VS Code was not complaining & was able to locate the typing definitions, implying something is wrong with ts-node complier.

Updating start script in package.json fixed it for me.

"start": "ts-node --files api/index.ts",

the --files arguments play a key role here find determining the custom type definitions.

For further information please visit: https://github.com/TypeStrong/ts-node#help-my-types-are-missing

1

It might be already quite late for this answer, but anyway here is how I solved:

  1. Make sure you have your types source included in your tsconfig file (this could be a whole new thread)
  2. Inside your types directory add a new directory and name it as the package you want to extend or create types for. In this specific case, you will create a directory with the name express
  3. Inside the express directory create a file and name it index.d.ts (MUST BE EXACTLY LIKE THAT)
  4. Finally to make the extension of the types you just need to put a code like the following:
declare module 'express' {
    export interface Request {
        property?: string;
    }
}
1

Simple solution which worked for me is to create a new custom interface extending express Request. This interface should contain all your custom req properties as optional. Set this interface as type for the middleware req.

// ICustomRequset.ts
   import { Request } from "express"
   export default interface ICustomRequset extends Request {
       email?: string;
       roles?: Array<string>;
   }

// AuthMiddleware.ts
...
export default async function (
  req: ICustomRequset,
  res: Response,
  next: NextFunction
) {
  try {
      // jwt code
      req.email=jwt.email
      req.roles=jwt.roles
      next()
  }catch(err){}
1
  • This question is about the addition of custom properties to existing request interface that can only be done using type declaration files. – Abhishek Pankar Mar 22 at 9:57
0

With express 4.17.1 the combination of https://stackoverflow.com/a/55718334/9321986 and https://stackoverflow.com/a/58788706/9321986 worked:

in types/express/index.d.ts:

declare module 'express-serve-static-core' {
    interface Request {
        task?: Task
    }
}

and in tsconfig.json:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "typeRoots": ["./types"]
    }
}
-9

why do we need to do so much hassle as in the above accepted answers, when we can get away with doing just this

instead of attaching our property to request, we can attach it to request headers

   req.headers[property] = "hello"
2
  • This isn't as effective because the headers property is just a dictionary. The TypeScript compiler won't be able to know anything about the headers. You can can do it this way, where you're explicitly opting out of the TypeScript compiler's help, using type assertions. You could do (req as any).myProp. – Matt Welke Nov 26 '20 at 21:37
  • (while I didn't downvote) another potential issue of this approach is that, unless you are absolutely certain to explicitly set the header you are using for this to the correct value on every request, it is possible for the external user to set headers by passing them in as part of the web request. For example, if you sometimes define 'IsAdmin' to be true under some conditions, and sometimes leave it undefined, a malicious user could set the 'IsAdmin' header explicitly and gain access to things that they shouldn't. – wojtow Dec 1 '20 at 20:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.