43

I want to remove specific elements in the original array (which is var a). I filter() that array and splice() returned new array. but that doesn't affect the original array in this code. How can I easily remove those elements from the original array?

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]

var b = a.filter(function (e) {
    return e.name === 'tc_001';
});

b.splice(0,1);

console.log(a);
console.log(b);
2

9 Answers 9

75

The Array.prototype.filter() method is used to collect an element set not only one item. If you would like to get one item by evaluating a condition then you have three other options:

  • Array.prototype.indexOf()
  • Array.prototype.findIndex()
  • Array.prototype.find()

Accordingly only if you want to make an operation on more than one item you should think of using the filter function. None of the answers is complete in terms of the job that is needed to be done.

They use the filter function to isolate a set (happens to be only one item in this example) but they don't show how to get rid of the whole set. Well ok, let's clarify.

If you want to do find and delete only one item of your array it shall be done like this

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}];
a.splice(a.findIndex(e => e.name === "tc_001"),1);
console.log(a);

However since you mention "specific elements" in plural, then you will need to collect a set of selected items and do the above job one by one on each element in the set. So the proper approach would be.

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}],
    b = a.filter(e => e.name === "tc_001");
b.forEach(f => a.splice(a.findIndex(e => e.name === f.name),1));
console.log(a);

Regardless of how many elements there are in your selected list, this will do your job. Yet I believe although this looks logical it does tons of redundant job. First filters and then per filtered element does index search this and that. Although I know that findIndex is crazy fast still I would expect this one to turn out to be noticeably slow especially with big arrays. Let's find an O(n) solution. Here you go:

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}];
a = a.reduce((p,c) => (c.name !== "tc_001" && p.push(c),p),[]);
console.log(a);

So this must be it.

5
  • 2
    I don't get that last one. Could you please break down last one to more simple form a.reduce(function (pre, curr) { ` if (curr.name !=="tc_001"){` ` return p.push(curr);` ` }else{` ` return p,[];` ` }` }) why do you push current object to previous object?
    – s1n7ax
    May 23, 2016 at 13:26
  • 2
    Yes, we are not modifying the original array instead creating a new array but at the end we are overwriting the original array with the result of the reduce function. Regarding the code you are close... it should look like this a.reduce(function (pre, curr) { if (curr.name !=="tc_001") p.push(curr); return p;}, []) We can not return the result of p.push(curr) since the push() function doesn't return the pushed array as result instead returns the length of it. It's silly. So we have to return p array separately for the reduce function to work. In my code this is why ,p comes at the end.
    – Redu
    May 23, 2016 at 13:38
  • why do we need an empty array to be passed to the reduce method?
    – s1n7ax
    May 23, 2016 at 16:31
  • 1
    @Srinesh it is the initialializing argument. Because of that p starts with an empty array and gets filled at every turn.
    – Redu
    May 23, 2016 at 16:34
  • With the first example, if you run it with a non-matching search, findIndex will return -1. And it will remove the last item of the array.
    – Jordan
    Jun 2 at 11:02
25

Another way is filtering in two list like this:

const originalList = [{condition:true}, {condition: false}, {condition: true}];

// wished lists
const listWithTrue = originalList.filter(x=>x.condition);
const listWithFalse = originalList.filter(x=>!x.condition); // inverse condition
3
  • This solution is way more elegant and simple in my opinion. Nov 21, 2018 at 16:31
  • Yes, but it creates a new array, so if you need to change the current array by refference, use another solution.
    – judian
    Feb 21, 2019 at 8:06
  • @judian It's generally better to note mutate the original array. Unless you're concerned about performance, this is a good solution.
    – Toby Caulk
    Apr 27, 2019 at 15:40
3

If I understood you, you want to remove the elements that matches the filter from the original array (a) but keep them in the new array (b) See if this solution is what you need:

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]

var b = a.filter(function (e) {
      return e.name === 'tc_002'
});

b.forEach(function(element) {
   console.log(element)
   var index = a.indexOf(element)
   console.log(index)
   a.splice(index, 1)
})

Result:

a = [{"name":"tc_001"},{"name":"tc_003"}] b = [{"name":"tc_002"}]
3

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}];

while ( a.findIndex(e => e.name === 'tc_002' ) >= 0 )
 a.splice( a.findIndex(f => f.name === 'tc_002'),1);
 
console.log(a);

2

You can assign filter array to a itself and then apply splice over it.

Example below:

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]
a = a.filter(function (e) {
    return e.name === 'tc_001';
});

a.splice(0,1);
1
  • How is this any different from what AlexD did?
    – Joe Thomas
    May 23, 2016 at 7:58
2

If being able to filter multiple elements is important, how about using reduce to iterate over the array and sort them into filtered and unfiltered categories. This has the upside of not iterating over the array more than once before processing the results.

function splitArray (arr, filterFn) {

  return arr.reduce((acc, el) => {

    const conditionMet = filterFn(el)

    if (conditionMet)
      return { ...acc, filtered: [...acc.filtered, el] }

    return { ...acc, unfiltered: [...acc.unfiltered, el] }

  }, { filtered: [], unfiltered: [] })
}

You could then split an array into two factions and apply the second to the original:

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4]

const {filtered, unfiltered} = splitArray(arr, el => el > 2)

console.log(filtered)   // [1, 2]
console.log(unfiltered) // [3, 4]

/* Do something with filtered */

arr = unfiltered
0
2

You can either make changes to the original array:

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]
a = a.filter(function (e) {
    return e.name === 'tc_001';
});
a.splice(0,1);

Or in your own code just apply to a everything you've done to b

a = b

Perhaps if I expand on what each action does, it will be more clear.

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]
// You now have array a with 3 elements.

b = a.filter(function (e) {
    return e.name === 'tc_001';
});
// a is still 3 elements, b has one element (tc_001)

b.splice(0,1);
// You remove the first element from b, so b is now empty.

If you want to remove the elements tc_002 and tc_003 from a but keep them in b, this is what you can do:

var a = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]
b = a.filter(function (e) {
    return e.name != 'tc_001';
});
a = a.filter(function(item) { return b.indexOf(item) == -1; });
console.log(a); // tc_001
console.log(b); // tc_002, tc_003
4
  • Then how am i going to use these two elements after change the reference of a {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}
    – s1n7ax
    May 23, 2016 at 7:50
  • You didn't mention anything about that in the question. You want to remove elements from a but keep them in a separate array?
    – AlexD
    May 23, 2016 at 7:52
  • Q : "How can i easily remove those elements for the original array?"
    – s1n7ax
    May 23, 2016 at 7:55
  • And the answer is what I wrote, but you mentioned now something about "use these two elements after". If you can clarify what you need I'm sure i'll be able to help.
    – AlexD
    May 23, 2016 at 7:56
0

You might try this approach.

Loop the array backwards, compare on each iteration and delete if matches.

In this example the objective is to delete those arrays whose name is "tc_001"

var x = [{name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_003'}, {name:'tc_001'},{name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_001'}, {name:'tc_003'}, {name:'tc_001'}]

var find_and_delete = "tc_0001"

for (var i = x.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if(x[i].name == find_and_delete){     
     x.splice(i,1)
    }
}

after this the new value of x is

[{name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}, {name:'tc_002'}, {name:'tc_003'}]
0

This function deletes filtered values in an array arr.

function filterpop(arr, fn) {
    let filteredValues = [];
    for (let i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (fn(arr[i])) {
            filteredValues.push(arr.splice(i, 1)[0]);
        }
    }
    return filteredValues;
};

Example:

const myArr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

const filteredArr = filterpop(arr, (v) => v > 3));

console.log(myArr)
// [1, 2, 3]

console.log(filteredArray)
// [4, 5, 6]

The truly elegant solution though, is be to create a custom array method:

Array.prototype.filterpop = function (fn) {
    let filteredValues = [];
    for (let i = this.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (fn(this[i])) {
            filteredValues.push(this.splice(i, 1)[0]);
        }
    }
    return filteredValues;
};

Example:

const myArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

const filteredArray = myArray.filterpop((v) => v > 3);  // CALL THE FILTER FUNCTION AS A METHOD ON YOUR ARRAY

console.log(myArr)
// [1, 2, 3]

console.log(filteredArray)
// [4, 5, 6]

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