88

We all know, the flex property is a shorthand for the flex-grow, flex-shrink, and the flex-basis properties. And its default value is 0 1 auto. It means:

flex-grow: 0;
flex-shrink: 1;
flex-basis: auto;

but I've noticed, in many places flex: 1 is used. Is it shorthand for 1 1 auto or 1 0 auto? I can't understand what does it mean? I get nothing searching in googling.

60

Here is the explanation:

https://www.w3.org/TR/css-flexbox-1/#flex-common

flex: <positive-number>
Equivalent to flex: <positive-number> 1 0. Makes the flex item flexible and sets the flex basis to zero, resulting in an item that receives the specified proportion of the free space in the flex container. If all items in the flex container use this pattern, their sizes will be proportional to the specified flex factor.

Therefore flex:1 it is equivalent to flex: 1 1 0

  • 6
    flex:1; does not equal flex:1 1 0; see my answer below ro see why. – DreamTeK Mar 9 '17 at 8:35
  • On a side-note: I think that when you're applying the same flex to all children, what matters is actually flex: 1 ? 0;, where "?" can be anything, it won't make any difference – flen Dec 25 '17 at 12:14
  • 1
    why is this the accepted answer? – Toskan Aug 6 '18 at 14:29
  • 1
    @Toskan Because it is correct. – TylerH Sep 7 '18 at 17:22
  • @DreamTeK Only in non-standards-compliant browsers like Chrome. – TylerH Sep 7 '18 at 17:23
72

flex: 1 means the following:

flex-grow : 1; // this means that the div will grow in same proportion as the window-size
flex-shrink : 1; // this means that the div will shrink in same proportion as the window-size 
flex-basis : 0; // this means that the div does not have a starting value as such and will take up screen as per the screen size available for.e.g:- if 3 divs are in the wrapper then each div will take 33%.
  • 1
    @CookieMonster No, flex: 1 means 1 1 0 ... but on IE it is 1 1 0px – LGSon Oct 2 '17 at 14:22
  • @LGSon, You can omit the unit from the basis value so 1 1 0 and 1 1 0px are equivalent. IE just happens to only support the one with a unit. – CookieMonster Oct 22 '17 at 18:12
  • @CookieMonster I know how Flexbox works, I was just correcting your first comment, which is wrong. – LGSon Oct 22 '17 at 19:36
  • @LGSon, How is flex: 1 means 1 1 0px wrong when 1 1 0px and 1 1 0 are equivalent? – CookieMonster Nov 5 '17 at 18:52
  • 2
    @CookieMonster They might render the same, but are not equivalent, as when using a unitless value for flex-basis, the content is ignored and the element size is based on its flex-grow/flex-shrink. – LGSon Nov 5 '17 at 19:54
47
+50

BE CAREFUL

In some browsers:

flex:1; does not equal flex:1 1 0;

flex:1; = flex:1 1 0n; (where n is a length unit).

  • flex-grow: A number specifying how much the item will grow relative to the rest of the flexible items.
  • flex-shrink A number specifying how much the item will shrink relative to the rest of the flexible items
  • flex-basis The length of the item. Legal values: "auto", "inherit", or a number followed by "%", "px", "em" or any other length unit.

The key point here is that flex-basis requires a length unit.

In Chrome for example flex:1 and flex:1 1 0 produce different results. In most circumstances it may appear that flex:1 1 0; is working but let's examine what really happens:

EXAMPLE

Flex basis is ignored and only flex-grow and flex-shrink are applied.

flex:1 1 0; = flex:1 1; = flex:1;

This may at first glance appear ok however if the applied unit of the container is nested; expect the unexpected!

Try this example in CHROME

.Wrap{
  padding:10px;
  background: #333;
}
.Flex110x, .Flex1, .Flex110, .Wrap {
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: flex;
  -webkit-flex-direction: column;
  flex-direction: column;
}
.Flex110 {
  -webkit-flex: 1 1 0;
  flex: 1 1 0;
}
.Flex1 {
  -webkit-flex: 1;
  flex: 1;
}
.Flex110x{
  -webkit-flex: 1 1 0%;
  flex: 1 1 0%;
}
FLEX 1 1 0
<div class="Wrap">
  <div class="Flex110">
    <input type="submit" name="test1" value="TEST 1">
  </div>
</div>

FLEX 1
<div class="Wrap">
  <div class="Flex1">
    <input type="submit" name="test2" value="TEST 2">
  </div>
</div>

FLEX 1 1 0%
<div class="Wrap">
  <div class="Flex110x">
    <input type="submit" name="test3" value="TEST 3">
  </div>
</div>

COMPATIBILITY

It should be noted that this fails because some browsers have failed to adhere to the specification.

Browsers that use the full flex specification:

  • Firefox - ✓
  • Edge - ✓ (I know, I was shocked too.)
  • Chrome - x
  • Brave - x
  • Opera - x
  • IE - (lol, it works without length unit but not with one.)

UPDATE 2019

Latest versions of Chrome seem to have finally rectified this issue but other browsers still have not.

Tested and working in Chrome Ver 74.

  • 1
    When the value is 0 the unit isn't mandatory. The specification says flex: 1 is the same that flex: 1 1 0. In your example if you remove the .Wrap class in the .Flex110x,.Flex1, .Flex110, .Wrap rule works as expected. – blonfu Mar 9 '17 at 9:40
  • Provide a link please, I can't found in the specification what you're saying. I have not invented anything, my answer is based on the flexbox specification – blonfu Mar 9 '17 at 13:43
  • @Obsidian Here is the link: w3.org/TR/css-flexbox-1 If you go to the portion for 'shorthand' you will find: "flex: [positive-number] Equivalent to flex: [positive-number] 1 0 ... – MikeB Apr 7 '17 at 18:08
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    @Toskan For maximum compatibility use the full syntax flex:1 1 0n; – DreamTeK Aug 6 '18 at 15:22
  • 1
    Thanks for pointing out this difference, I couldn't figure out where my issues were stemming from. Have some bounty. – Nit Dec 21 '18 at 9:20

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