8

I have a vector, say vec1, and another vector named vec2 as follows:

vec1 = c(4,1)
# [1] 4 1

vec2 = c(5,3,2)
# [1] 5 3 2

What I'm looking for is all possible combinations of vec1 and vec2 while the order of the vectors' elements is kept. That is, the resultant matrix should be like this:

> res
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
 [1,]    4    1    5    3    2
 [2,]    4    5    1    3    2
 [3,]    4    5    3    1    2
 [4,]    4    5    3    2    1
 [5,]    5    4    1    3    2
 [6,]    5    4    3    1    2
 [7,]    5    4    3    2    1
 [8,]    5    3    4    1    2
 [9,]    5    3    4    2    1
[10,]    5    3    2    4    1

# res=structure(c(4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 1, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 
# 3, 3, 3, 5, 1, 3, 3, 1, 3, 3, 4, 4, 2, 3, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 
# 2, 4, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1), .Dim = c(10L, 5L))

There is no repetition allowed for two vectors. That is, all rows of the resultant matrix have unique elements.

I'm actually looking for the most efficient way. One way to tackle this problem is to generate all possible permutations of length n which grows factorially (n=5 here) and then apply filtering. But it's time-consuming as n grows.

Is there an efficient way to do that?

1
  • So, it's clear you don't want permutations, but what exactly do you mean by "preserving order" ? That all elements of vec2 must appear in the original indexed order (and same for vec1), but there's no limit on whether an element of one input precedes any elements of the other? Next, what if there is a common value in both vectors? Or is that guaranteed not to happen? May 23, 2016 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

13

Try this one:

nv1 <- length(vec1)
nv2 <- length(vec2)
n <- nv1 + nv2

result <- combn(n,nv1,function(v) {z=integer(n);z[v]=vec1;z[-v]=vec2;z})

The idea is to produce all combinations of indices at which to put the elements of vec1.

1
  • Thanks a lot! very nice idea. Just a minor edit. t(result) should be returned.
    – 989
    May 23, 2016 at 15:17
2

Not that elegant as Marat Talipov solution, but you can do:

# get the ordering per vector
cc <- c(order(vec1,decreasing = T), order(vec2, decreasing = T)+length(vec1))
cc
[1] 1 2 3 4 5

# permutation to get all "order-combinations"
library(combinat)
m <- do.call(rbind, permn(cc))

# remove unsorted per vector, only if both vectors are correct set TRUE for both:
gr <- apply(m, 1, function(x){
          !is.unsorted(x[x < (length(vec1)+1)]) & !is.unsorted(x[x > (length(vec1))])
       })

# result, exchange the order index with the vector elements:
t(apply(m[gr, ], 1, function(x, y) y[x], c(vec1, vec2)))
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    4    1    5    3    2
[2,]    4    5    3    1    2
[3,]    4    5    3    2    1
[4,]    4    5    1    3    2
[5,]    5    4    1    3    2
[6,]    5    4    3    2    1
[7,]    5    4    3    1    2
[8,]    5    3    4    1    2
[9,]    5    3    4    2    1
[10,]   5    3    2    4    1

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