3

Please tell me if I am thinking it alright.

  1. A different thread cannot enter the same critical section using the same lock just because the first thread called Monitor.Wait, right? The Wait method only allows a different thread to acquire the same monitor, i.e. the same synchronization lock but only for a different critical section and never for the same critical section.

    Is my understanding correct?

    Because if the Wait method meant that anyone can now enter this same critical section using this same lock, then that would defeat the whole purpose of synchronization, right?

    So, in the code below (written in notepad, so please forgive any typos), ThreadProc2 can only use syncLock to enter the code in ThreadProc2 and not in ThreadProc1 while the a previous thread that held and subsequently relinquished the lock was executing ThreadProc1, right?

  2. Two or more threads can use the same synchronization lock to run different pieces of code at the same time, right? Same question as above, basically, but just confirming for the sake of symmetry with point 3 below.

  3. Two or more threads can use a different synchronization lock to run the same piece of code, i.e. to enter the same critical section.

Boilerplate text to correct the formatting.

class Foo
{
    private static object syncLock = new object();

    public void ThreadProc1()
    {
        try
        {
            Monitor.Enter(syncLock);

            Monitor.Wait(syncLock);

            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
        finally
        {
            if (Monitor.IsLocked(syncLock))
            {
                Monitor.Exit(syncLock);
            }
        }
    }

    public void ThreadProc2()
    {
        bool acquired = false;

        try
        {
            // Calling TryEnter instead of
            // Enter just for the sake of variety
            Monitor.TryEnter(syncLock, ref acquired);

            if (acquired)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(200);
                Monitor.Pulse(syncLock);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (acquired)
            {
                Monitor.Exit(syncLock);
            }
        }
    }
}

Update

The following illustration confirms that #3 is correct although I don't think it will be a nice thing to do.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace DifferentSyncLockSameCriticalSection
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var sathyaish = new Person { Name = "Sathyaish Chakravarthy" };
            var superman = new Person { Name = "Superman" };
            var tasks = new List<Task>();

            // Must not lock on string so I am using
            // an object of the Person class as a lock
            tasks.Add(Task.Run( () => { Proc1(sathyaish); } ));
            tasks.Add(Task.Run(() => { Proc1(superman); }));

            Task.WhenAll(tasks);

            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        static void Proc1(object state)
        {
            // Although this would be a very bad practice
            lock(state)
            {
                try
                {
                    Console.WriteLine((state.ToString()).Length);
                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    class Person
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return Name;
        }
    }
}
4

When a thread calls Monitor.Wait it is suspended and the lock released. This will allow another thread to acquire the lock, update some state, and then call Monitor.Pulse in order to communicate to other threads that something has happened. You must have acquired the lock in order to call Pulse. Before Monitor.Wait returns the framework will reacquire the lock for the thread that called Wait.

In order for two threads to communicate with each other they need to use the same synchronization primitive. In your example you've used a monitor, but you usually need to combine this with some kind of test that the Wait returned in response to a Pulse. This is because it is technically possible to Wait to return even if Pulse wasn't called (although this doesn't happen in practice).

It's also worth remembering that a call to Pulse isn't "sticky", so if nobody is waiting on the monitor then Pulse does nothing and a subsequent call to Wait will miss the fact that Pulse was called. This is another reason why you tend to record the fact that something has been done before calling Pulse (see the example below).

It's perfectly valid for two different threads to use the same lock to run different bits of code - in fact this is the typical use-case. For example, one thread acquires the lock to write some data and another thread acquires the lock to read the data. However, it's important to realize that they don't run at the same time. The act of acquiring the lock prevents another thread from acquiring the same lock, so any thread attempting to acquire the lock when it is already locked will block until the other thread releases the lock.

In point 3 you ask:

Two or more threads can use a different synchronization lock to run the same piece of code, i.e. to enter the same critical section.

However, if two threads are using different locks then they are not entering the same critical section. The critical section is denoted by the lock that protects it - if they're different locks then they are different sections that just happen to access some common data within the section. You should avoid doing this as it can lead to some difficult to debug data race conditions.

Your code is a bit over-complicated for what you're trying to accomplish. For example, let's say we've got 2 threads, and one will signal when there is data available for another to process:

    class Foo
    {
        private readonly object syncLock = new object();
        private bool dataAvailable = false;

        public void ThreadProc1()
        {
            lock(syncLock)
            {
                while(!dataAvailable)
                {
                    // Release the lock and suspend
                    Monitor.Wait(syncLock);
                }

                // Now process the data
            }
        }

        public void ThreadProc2()
        {
            LoadData();

            lock(syncLock)
            {
                dataAvailable = true;
                Monitor.Pulse(syncLock);
            }
        }

        private void LoadData()
        {
            // Gets some data
        }
    }
}
  • Ah! Beautiful, that dataAvailable hedge to ensure that the monitor was pulsed. Thank you. There are a few new thoughts that I now have reading your answer but I will ask them in a different comment below. First, could you please also confirm my understanding in the original question, esp. #2 (which is the same as #1) and #3? – Water Cooler v2 May 23 '16 at 15:43
  • Meanwhile, nice pictures on Flickr. I am also interested but in video / making films. I have a YouTube channel but I am not very good yet. :-) – Water Cooler v2 May 23 '16 at 15:49
  • @WaterCoolerv2 - I've updated the answer (and thanks for looking at the pictures!) – Sean May 23 '16 at 15:52
  • As to your answer for point #3, I thought the same thing too because it was more intuitive to think that two threads cannot acquire different locks to enter the same critical section. But the wording on the MSDN documentation led me to believe so. Here are a few statements from the documentation that confuse me. Verbatim: "While it is possible for the Enter and Exit statements that lock and release a given object to cross member or class boundaries or both, this practice is not recommended." I am searching for yet another one that was more clear in what it said. – Water Cooler v2 May 23 '16 at 15:56
  • @WaterCoolerv2 this last sentence just means you should avoid doing Enter in one method and then doing Exit in another method, or even in another class, because it's too easy then to forget to release the lock which will block all other threads trying to enter the same section, forever. So good practice is to do Enter\Exit in the same method (or even better just use lock statement which does the same). – Evk May 23 '16 at 16:03

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