57

What is the easiest way to convert a PSCustomObject to a Hashtable? It displays just like one with the splat operator, curly braces and what appear to be key value pairs. When I try to cast it to [Hashtable] it doesn't work. I also tried .toString() and the assigned variable says its a string but displays nothing - any ideas?

75

Shouldn't be too hard. Something like this should do the trick:

# Create a PSCustomObject (ironically using a hashtable)
$ht1 = @{ A = 'a'; B = 'b'; DateTime = Get-Date }
$theObject = new-object psobject -Property $ht1

# Convert the PSCustomObject back to a hashtable
$ht2 = @{}
$theObject.psobject.properties | Foreach { $ht2[$_.Name] = $_.Value }
  • Note that $_.Name is already a string, so $ht2[$_.Name] or $h.($_.Name) will work just as well as "$($_.Name)". – Emperor XLII Jun 5 '11 at 14:53
  • 1
    You're right. It was sloppy scripting on my part. :-) – Keith Hill Jun 6 '11 at 19:52
  • 4
    Note that this doesn't work for PSCustomObjects created by ConvertFrom-Json. This question addresses that issue. – BenV Jan 16 '15 at 23:22
  • 3
    @BenV: Just to clarify: The problem stems from nested custom objects, not from use of ConvertFrom-Json per se, which also produces [PSCustomObject] instances. In other words: a JSON source that produces non-nested objects works just fine; e.g.: ('{ "foo": "bar" }' | ConvertFrom-Json).psobject.properties | % { $ht = @{} } { $ht[$_.Name] = $_.Value } { $ht } – mklement0 Jan 20 '16 at 19:59
  • 2
    Casting could become a reality in the future: connect.microsoft.com/PowerShell/feedback/details/679841/… – W1M0R Mar 8 '16 at 11:22
25

Keith already gave you the answer, this is just another way of doing the same with a one-liner:

$psobject.psobject.properties | foreach -begin {$h=@{}} -process {$h."$($_.Name)" = $_.Value} -end {$h}
  • Heh, started with something very similar except that it was just long enough to invoke the SO horizontal scrollbar. BTW I think your $'s are missing some _'s. :-) – Keith Hill Sep 18 '10 at 16:13
  • That's what I was trying to avoid and eventually it swallowed the underscore sign. Thanks! – Shay Levy Sep 19 '10 at 15:56
  • @ShayLevy: What is the advantage of putting everything on the same line? – Rubanov May 11 '15 at 13:30
  • Nice; if you use % and positional parameters as the blocks, you can shorten to $psobject.psobject.properties | % { $ht = @{} } { $ht[$_.Name] = $_.Value } { $ht }. @Rubanov: It doesn't have to be on a single line, but the advantage is that a single statement (pipeline) creates the hashtable. – mklement0 Jan 20 '16 at 19:41
18

Here's a version that works with nested hashtables / arrays as well (which is useful if you're trying to do this with DSC ConfigurationData):

function ConvertPSObjectToHashtable
{
    param (
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline)]
        $InputObject
    )

    process
    {
        if ($null -eq $InputObject) { return $null }

        if ($InputObject -is [System.Collections.IEnumerable] -and $InputObject -isnot [string])
        {
            $collection = @(
                foreach ($object in $InputObject) { ConvertPSObjectToHashtable $object }
            )

            Write-Output -NoEnumerate $collection
        }
        elseif ($InputObject -is [psobject])
        {
            $hash = @{}

            foreach ($property in $InputObject.PSObject.Properties)
            {
                $hash[$property.Name] = ConvertPSObjectToHashtable $property.Value
            }

            $hash
        }
        else
        {
            $InputObject
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    This is the only version that worked for my data with multi-level nested objects and arrays. – Jeffrey Harmon Feb 9 '16 at 12:55
  • 2
    Excellent & elegant solution for the multi-level nested objects. – Petru Zaharia Sep 21 '16 at 0:33
3

This works for PSCustomObjects created by ConvertFrom_Json.

Function ConvertConvertFrom-JsonPSCustomObjectToHash($obj)
{
    $hash = @{}
     $obj | Get-Member -MemberType Properties | SELECT -exp "Name" | % {
                $hash[$_] = ($obj | SELECT -exp $_)
      }
      $hash
}

Disclaimer: I barely understand PowerShell so this is probably not as clean as it could be. But it works (for one level only).

  • 1
    Little more cleaner (may be tougher to understand) $hash=@{};$obj | Get-Member -MemberType Properties | foreach { $hash.Add($_.Name,$obj.($_.Name))} – Adarsha May 17 '17 at 2:38
0

My code:

function PSCustomObjectConvertToHashtable() {
    param(
        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline)]
        $object
    )

    if ( $object -eq $null ) { return $null }

    if ( $object -is [psobject] ) {
        $result = @{}
        $items = $object | Get-Member -MemberType NoteProperty
        foreach( $item in $items ) {
            $key = $item.Name
            $value = PSCustomObjectConvertToHashtable -object $object.$key
            $result.Add($key, $value)
        }
        return $result
    } elseif ($object -is [array]) {
        $result = [object[]]::new($object.Count)
        for ($i = 0; $i -lt $object.Count; $i++) {
            $result[$i] = (PSCustomObjectConvertToHashtable -object $object[$i])
        }
        return ,$result
    } else {
        return $object
    }
}

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