191

Here's my situation:

  • on this.handleFormSubmit() I am executing this.setState()
  • inside this.handleFormSubmit(), I am calling this.findRoutes(); - which depends on the successful completion of this.setState()
  • this.setState(); does not complete before this.findRoutes is called...
  • How do I wait for this.setState() inside of this.handleFormSubmit() to finish before calling this.findRoutes()?

A subpar solution:

  • putting this.findRoutes() in componentDidUpdate()
  • this is not acceptable because there will be more state changes unrelated the findRoutes() function. I don't want to trigger the findRoutes() function when unrelated state is updated.

Please see code snippet below:

handleFormSubmit: function(input){
                // Form Input
                this.setState({
                    originId: input.originId,
                    destinationId: input.destinationId,
                    radius: input.radius,
                    search: input.search
                })
                this.findRoutes();
            },
            handleMapRender: function(map){
                // Intialized Google Map
                directionsDisplay = new google.maps.DirectionsRenderer();
                directionsService = new google.maps.DirectionsService();
                this.setState({map: map});
                placesService = new google.maps.places.PlacesService(map);
                directionsDisplay.setMap(map);
            },
            findRoutes: function(){
                var me = this;
                if (!this.state.originId || !this.state.destinationId) {
                    alert("findRoutes!");
                    return;
                }
                var p1 = new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
                    directionsService.route({
                        origin: {'placeId': me.state.originId},
                        destination: {'placeId': me.state.destinationId},
                        travelMode: me.state.travelMode
                    }, function(response, status){
                        if (status === google.maps.DirectionsStatus.OK) {
                            // me.response = response;
                            directionsDisplay.setDirections(response);
                            resolve(response);
                        } else {
                            window.alert('Directions config failed due to ' + status);
                        }
                    });
                });
                return p1
            },
            render: function() {
                return (
                    <div className="MapControl">
                        <h1>Search</h1>
                        <MapForm
                            onFormSubmit={this.handleFormSubmit}
                            map={this.state.map}/>
                        <GMap
                            setMapState={this.handleMapRender}
                            originId= {this.state.originId}
                            destinationId= {this.state.destinationId}
                            radius= {this.state.radius}
                            search= {this.state.search}/>
                    </div>
                );
            }
        });

7 Answers 7

328

setState() has an optional callback parameter that you can use for this. You only need to change your code slightly, to this:

// Form Input
this.setState(
  {
    originId: input.originId,
    destinationId: input.destinationId,
    radius: input.radius,
    search: input.search
  },
  this.findRoutes         // here is where you put the callback
);

Notice the call to findRoutes is now inside the setState() call, as the second parameter.
Without () because you are passing the function.

7
  • 1
    This will work nicely for resetting an AnimatedValue after setState in ReactNative. Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 23:56
  • 3
    A generic version this.setState({ name: "myname" }, function() { console.log("setState completed", this.state) }) Commented Mar 8, 2018 at 10:33
  • It doesn't look like you can pass more than one callback to setState. Is there a non-messy way of chaining callbacks? Lets say i've got 3 methods that all need to run, and all update state. What is the preferred way to handle this?
    – Sean
    Commented May 1, 2018 at 20:05
  • Without further info, I would think the 1 callback would then be a container, that calls any of your 3 methods (if they need to be fired in sequence). Or the container calls your 3 methods in sequence, and after that does one setState() (if you really do not need 4 state changes in a row). Could you elaborate on the specific us case?
    – wintvelt
    Commented May 1, 2018 at 20:20
  • 1
    @ARiyouJahan I would not go so far to say that "setState() will lose its purpose". setState() is asynchronous and therefore quite impure. That said, I do agree that in 9 out of 10 cases, there are better ways to solve the issue. If you want something to happen inside the component after the state changes, it is often better to adhere to render cycle logic of react, by putting state somewhere else, or by using lifecycle functions or useEffect.
    – wintvelt
    Commented Oct 23, 2022 at 10:18
59

If someone here landed and having the same situation using hooks, the same behavior can be achived via the below process

const [data, setData] = useState(false);

useEffect(() => {
    doSomething(); // This will be executed when the state changes
}, [data]);

setData(true);

Here useEffect will run after any change in data, and we can execute any dependent task.

4
  • 5
    Note, dev might want to skip first render by adding a condition, as the code also will run on first render
    – cyberfly
    Commented May 27, 2022 at 2:01
  • 3
    we want doSomething to run one time after setData() in our handler. NOT every time setData() was called and data got updated in every other function! Commented Oct 22, 2022 at 9:36
  • In these type of cases we can check inside useEffect function , if condition met , then dosomthing(); else skip. can you share more details/code for your scenario ?
    – Furquan
    Commented Oct 26, 2022 at 20:32
  • There's a discussion in this answer about how to avoid updating on the first render. Commented Nov 24, 2023 at 23:49
22
this.setState({
    originId: input.originId,
    destinationId: input.destinationId,
    radius: input.radius,
    search: input.search
  },
  function() {
    console.log("setState completed", this.state)
  }
)
1
  • 4
    Some explanation would make this a better answer. See How to Answer.
    – isherwood
    Commented Jul 27, 2022 at 13:31
12

setState takes new state and optional callback function which is called after the state has been updated.

this.setState(
  {newState: 'whatever'},
  () => {/*do something after the state has been updated*/}
)
1
  • 4
    This is a repeat of an answer from four years earlier.
    – isherwood
    Commented Jul 27, 2022 at 13:32
10

According to the docs of setState() the new state might not get reflected in the callback function findRoutes(). Here is the extract from React docs:

setState() does not immediately mutate this.state but creates a pending state transition. Accessing this.state after calling this method can potentially return the existing value.

There is no guarantee of synchronous operation of calls to setState and calls may be batched for performance gains.

So here is what I propose you should do. You should pass the new states input in the callback function findRoutes().

handleFormSubmit: function(input){
    // Form Input
    this.setState({
        originId: input.originId,
        destinationId: input.destinationId,
        radius: input.radius,
        search: input.search
    });
    this.findRoutes(input);    // Pass the input here
}

The findRoutes() function should be defined like this:

findRoutes: function(me = this.state) {    // This will accept the input if passed otherwise use this.state
    if (!me.originId || !me.destinationId) {
        alert("findRoutes!");
        return;
    }
    var p1 = new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        directionsService.route({
            origin: {'placeId': me.originId},
            destination: {'placeId': me.destinationId},
            travelMode: me.travelMode
        }, function(response, status){
            if (status === google.maps.DirectionsStatus.OK) {
                // me.response = response;
                directionsDisplay.setDirections(response);
                resolve(response);
            } else {
                window.alert('Directions config failed due to ' + status);
            }
        });
    });
    return p1
}
2
  • this has a serious flaw - passing a literal obj to setState() as the new state is not good because it leads to race conditions
    – tar
    Commented Jun 10, 2019 at 17:34
  • 2
    here's another quote from the react docs (which might have been updated since you posted your answer): "...use componentDidUpdate or a setState callback (setState(updater, callback)), either of which are guaranteed to fire after the update has been applied". This says to me that the new state most definitely is reflected in the callback function.
    – Andy
    Commented Apr 1, 2020 at 17:57
0

Why not one more answer? setState() and the setState()-triggered render() have both completed executing when you call componentDidMount() (the first time render() is executed) and/or componentDidUpdate() (any time after render() is executed). (Links are to ReactJS.org docs.)

Example with componentDidUpdate()

Caller, set reference and set state...

<Cmp ref={(inst) => {this.parent=inst}}>;
this.parent.setState({'data':'hello!'});

Render parent...

componentDidMount() {           // componentDidMount() gets called after first state set
    console.log(this.state.data);   // output: "hello!"
}
componentDidUpdate() {          // componentDidUpdate() gets called after all other states set
    console.log(this.state.data);   // output: "hello!"
}

Example with componentDidMount()

Caller, set reference and set state...

<Cmp ref={(inst) => {this.parent=inst}}>
this.parent.setState({'data':'hello!'});

Render parent...

render() {              // render() gets called anytime setState() is called
    return (
        <ChildComponent
            state={this.state}
        />
    );
}

After parent rerenders child, see state in componentDidUpdate().

componentDidMount() {           // componentDidMount() gets called anytime setState()/render() finish
console.log(this.props.state.data); // output: "hello!"
}
1
0

For completeness, thought I'd mention the hooks version of the setState callback function:

// problem: each batched state update overrides previous values
function handleClickNope() {
  setAge(age + 1); // setAge(42 + 1)
  setAge(age + 1); // setAge(42 + 1)
  setAge(age + 1); // setAge(42 + 1)
}

// solution: 'updater function' always operates on current state
function handleClickYup() {
  setAge(prevAge => prevAge + 1); // setAge(42 => 43)
  setAge(prevAge => prevAge + 1); // setAge(43 => 44)
  setAge(prevAge => prevAge + 1); // setAge(44 => 45)
}

https://react.dev/reference/react/useState#updating-state-based-on-the-previous-state

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