20

How to generate a random integer as with np.random.randint(), but with a normal distribution around 0.

np.random.randint(-10, 10) returns integers with a discrete uniform distribution np.random.normal(0, 0.1, 1) returns floats with a normal distribution

What I want is a kind of combination between the two functions.

  • 14
    The normal distribution is continuous by definition, so the answer to this question depends on how you want to discretise it. One possible solution is to sample from np.random.normal and round the result to an integer. – Will Vousden May 24 '16 at 11:07
25

One other possible way to get a discrete distribution that looks like the normal distribution is to draw from a multinomial distribution where the probabilities are calculated from a normal distribution.

import scipy.stats as ss
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = np.arange(-10, 11)
xU, xL = x + 0.5, x - 0.5 
prob = ss.norm.cdf(xU, scale = 3) - ss.norm.cdf(xL, scale = 3)
prob = prob / prob.sum() #normalize the probabilities so their sum is 1
nums = np.random.choice(x, size = 10000, p = prob)
plt.hist(nums, bins = len(x))

Here, np.random.choice picks an integer from [-10, 10]. The probability for selecting an element, say 0, is calculated by p(-0.5 < x < 0.5) where x is a normal random variable with mean zero and standard deviation 3. I chooce std. dev. as 3 because this way p(-10 < x < 10) is almost 1.

The result looks like this:

enter image description here

  • Why did you add and subtract 0.5 in xL and xU? – Kenenbek Arzymatov Sep 15 '16 at 14:07
  • 2
    For a continuous distribution, P(x=0)=0 (this is true for any other number). The probabiltiy is defined for intervals. Here, in order to associate a probability to 0 (and to other integers) I used the interval (-0.5, 0.5) It was basically because the question asked for integers. For 1, it is (0.5, 1.5). – ayhan Sep 15 '16 at 14:13
  • 1
    Why didn't you take ss.norm.pdf(x, scale=3)? – Kenenbek Arzymatov Sep 15 '16 at 14:22
  • 2
    It would work fine with these parameters but with a smaller standard deviation you would end up pdf's greater than 1, for example. It would be fine as long as you do the same normalization (dividing by the sum) afterwards but I didn't want to confuse potential readers since pdf is actually not probability (that's why it can be greater than 1) so I wanted to use actual probabilities. – ayhan Sep 15 '16 at 14:30
12

It may be possible to generate a similar distribution from a Truncated Normal Distribution that is rounded up to integers. Here's an example with scipy's truncnorm().

import numpy as np
from scipy.stats import truncnorm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

scale = 3.
range = 10
size = 100000

X = truncnorm(a=-range/scale, b=+range/scale, scale=scale).rvs(size=size)
X = X.round().astype(int)

Let's see what it looks like

bins = 2 * range + 1
plt.hist(X, bins)

enter image description here

  • I appreciate the responses from both @ayhan and bakkal. Please, I only ask this for my knowledge; I do not wish to insult either answer. Just looking at the plot, Bakkal's is more symmetric. They both seem sufficient and from the code seem equally valid. But my understanding is weak. Is there a objectively better method? – Robert Lugg Nov 17 '17 at 18:33
  • 1
    @RobertLugg the relatively higher symmetry may be due to sample size being larger. That said, I think the code in this answer is simpler. – bakkal Nov 17 '17 at 18:38
  • Be aware that you overwrite the python range function with this code. Try to use neutral variable names. – Rriskit Nov 20 '19 at 19:41
4

The accepted answer here works, but I tried Will Vousden's solution and it works well too:

import numpy as np

# Generate Distribution:
randomNums = np.random.normal(scale=3, size=100000)
randomInts = np.round(randomNums)

# Plot:
axis = np.arange(start=min(randomInts), stop = max(randomInts) + 1)
plt.hist(randomInts, bins = axis)

Looks good no?

  • 1
    Instead of generating randomNums and rounding them to "ints" (actually, reals ending in .0), what about randomInts = np.random.normal(loc=10, scale=3, size=10000).astype(int)-10, which returns actual ints? Note, however, that it's necessary to generate values with a loc other than 0 (and return it to 0 by subtracting the loc), or you'll end up with far too many results at exactly 0. – Dave Land Aug 21 '19 at 18:32
0

Here we start by getting values from the bell curve.

CODE:

#--------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*
# Desc: Discretize a normal distribution centered at 0
#--------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*

import sys
import random
from math import sqrt, pi
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def gaussian(x, var):
    k1 = np.power(x, 2)
    k2 = -k1/(2*var)
    return (1./(sqrt(2. * pi * var))) * np.exp(k2)

#--------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------#
while 1:#                          M A I N L I N E                             #
#--------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------*---------#
#                                  # probability density function
#                                  #   for discrete normal RV
    pdf_DGV = []
    pdf_DGW = []    
    var = 9
    tot = 0    
#                                  # create 'rough' gaussian
    for i in range(-var - 1, var + 2):
        if i ==  -var - 1:
            r_pdf = + gaussian(i, 9) + gaussian(i - 1, 9) + gaussian(i - 2, 9)
        elif i == var + 1:
            r_pdf = + gaussian(i, 9) + gaussian(i + 1, 9) + gaussian(i + 2, 9)
        else:
            r_pdf = gaussian(i, 9)
        tot = tot + r_pdf
        pdf_DGV.append(i)
        pdf_DGW.append(r_pdf)
        print(i, r_pdf)
#                                  # amusing how close tot is to 1!
    print('\nRough total = ', tot)
#                                  # no need to normalize with Python 3.6,
#                                  #   but can't help ourselves
    for i in range(0,len(pdf_DGW)):
        pdf_DGW[i] = pdf_DGW[i]/tot
#                                  # print out pdf weights
#                                  #   for out discrte gaussian
    print('\npdf:\n')
    print(pdf_DGW)

#                                  # plot random variable action
    rv_samples = random.choices(pdf_DGV, pdf_DGW, k=10000)
    plt.hist(rv_samples, bins = 100)
    plt.show()
    sys.exit()

OUTPUT:

-10 0.0007187932912256041
-9 0.001477282803979336
-8 0.003798662007932481
-7 0.008740629697903166
-6 0.017996988837729353
-5 0.03315904626424957
-4 0.05467002489199788
-3 0.0806569081730478
-2 0.10648266850745075
-1 0.12579440923099774
0 0.1329807601338109
1 0.12579440923099774
2 0.10648266850745075
3 0.0806569081730478
4 0.05467002489199788
5 0.03315904626424957
6 0.017996988837729353
7 0.008740629697903166
8 0.003798662007932481
9 0.001477282803979336
10 0.0007187932912256041

Rough total =  0.9999715875468381

pdf:

[0.000718813714486599, 0.0014773247784004072, 0.003798769940305483, 0.008740878047691289, 0.017997500190860556, 0.033159988420867426, 0.05467157824565407, 0.08065919989878699, 0.10648569402724471, 0.12579798346031068, 0.13298453855078374, 0.12579798346031068, 0.10648569402724471, 0.08065919989878699, 0.05467157824565407, 0.033159988420867426, 0.017997500190860556, 0.008740878047691289, 0.003798769940305483, 0.0014773247784004072, 0.000718813714486599]

enter image description here

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