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I'm trying to create a user with contacts table. I'm not sure if I'm doing it the right way as there is a column added which I didn't declare.

The entities:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public bool IsAvailable { get; set; }
    public List<Contact> Contacts { get; set; }
}

public class Contact
{
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public int ContactUserId { get; set; }

    public User User { get; set; }
    public User ContactUser { get; set; }
}

The mapping:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>()
        .HasKey(x => new { x.UserId, x.ContactUserId });

    modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>()
        .HasOne(x => x.User)
        .WithMany(x => x.Contacts)
        .HasForeignKey(x => x.UserId);

    modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>()
        .HasOne(x => x.ContactUser)
        .WithMany(x => x.Contacts)
        .HasForeignKey(x => x.ContactUserId);
}

The result:

migrationBuilder.CreateTable(
    name: "Contact",
    columns: table => new
    {
        UserId = table.Column<int>(nullable: false),
        ContactUserId = table.Column<int>(nullable: false),
        UserId1 = table.Column<int>(nullable: true)
    },
    constraints: table =>
    {
        table.PrimaryKey("PK_Contact", x => new { x.UserId, x.ContactUserId });
        table.ForeignKey(
            name: "FK_Contact_User_ContactUserId",
            column: x => x.ContactUserId,
            principalTable: "User",
            principalColumn: "Id",
            onDelete: ReferentialAction.Cascade);
        table.ForeignKey(
            name: "FK_Contact_User_UserId1",
            column: x => x.UserId1,
            principalTable: "User",
            principalColumn: "Id",
            onDelete: ReferentialAction.Restrict);
    });

The real question:

Where is the column UserId1 in contact coming from? Is there something wrong with my definition? Thanks!

3
  • Are you trying to do a n:n or 1:n relationship? From your model it looks like you have 1 User with n Contacts, which isn't many to many but one to many, if i'm not mistaken.
    – HotTowelie
    May 24, 2016 at 17:03
  • @HotTowelie It's 1:n to Contact, then n:1 to Contact.ContactUser. So, User is n:n to itself.
    – Marc L.
    May 24, 2016 at 17:12
  • Might be related: User.Contacts cannot be both the navigation property from User to its ContactUsers and the navigation property going the other way at he same time. One of those should be configured out from the User entity, and the other configured with the parameterless HasMany().
    – Marc L.
    May 24, 2016 at 17:18

1 Answer 1

2

The reason you ended up with an additional UserId1 on contact table is because you are specifying the other side of both User and ContactUser associations on Contact object to be Contacts on User object which is incorrect. As a result, EF ignores it and creates yet another association for Contacts on User object and map it to UserId1 column on Contact table.

One way to fix this is to create another list of Contacts on User object and map it accordingly:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public bool IsAvailable { get; set; }

    public List<Contact> Contacts { get; set; }
    public List<Contact> ContactUsers { get; set; }
}

modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>()
    .HasOne(x => x.User)
    .WithMany(x => x.Contacts)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.UserId);

modelBuilder.Entity<Contact>()
    .HasOne(x => x.ContactUser)
    .WithMany(x => x.ContactUsers)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ContactUserId)
    .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict);


Which yields the desired schema:

enter image description here

1
  • Thank you very much and also thumbs up for the OnDelete addition!
    – Megamind
    May 25, 2016 at 12:49

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