66

If I have a double (234.004223), etc., I would like to round this to x significant digits in C#.

So far I can only find ways to round to x decimal places, but this simply removes the precision if there are any 0s in the number.

For example, 0.086 to one decimal place becomes 0.1, but I would like it to stay at 0.08.

  • 1
    Do you want x no of digits after initial '0's of decimals. For example if you want to keep 2 no of digits to following number 0.00030908 is 0.00031 or do you want 0.00030? or something else? – lakshmanaraj Dec 17 '08 at 11:58
  • 1
    I'm not clear what you mean here. In your example, are you trying to round to 2 decimal places? Or leave just one digit? If the latter, it should be 0.09, surely, rounding up the 6... – The Archetypal Paul Dec 17 '08 at 11:59
  • Or are you looking for N * 10^X, where N has a specified number of digits? – The Archetypal Paul Dec 17 '08 at 11:59
  • Please give us some more examples of original numbers and what you want to see as output – The Archetypal Paul Dec 17 '08 at 12:04
  • 7
    I disagree. Rounding to significant digits doesn't mean that you should automatically truncate instead of round. For example, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Significant_figures. "... if rounding 0.039 to 1 significant figure, the result would be 0.04." – P Daddy Dec 17 '08 at 20:22

13 Answers 13

83

The framework doesn't have a built-in function to round (or truncate, as in your example) to a number of significant digits. One way you can do this, though, is to scale your number so that your first significant digit is right after the decimal point, round (or truncate), then scale back. The following code should do the trick:

static double RoundToSignificantDigits(this double d, int digits){
    if(d == 0)
        return 0;

    double scale = Math.Pow(10, Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d))) + 1);
    return scale * Math.Round(d / scale, digits);
}

If, as in your example, you really want to truncate, then you want:

static double TruncateToSignificantDigits(this double d, int digits){
    if(d == 0)
        return 0;

    double scale = Math.Pow(10, Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d))) + 1 - digits);
    return scale * Math.Truncate(d / scale);
}
  • 10
    @leftbrainlogic: Yes, it really does: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/75ks3aby.aspx – P Daddy Dec 1 '09 at 18:03
  • 4
    Neither of these methods will work with negative numbers as Math.Log10 will return Double.NaN if d < 0. – Fraser Feb 26 '12 at 8:13
  • 3
    @PDaddy hmmm, you would need to check if d == 0 as this will result in Double.NaN too - both methods need a couple of guard clauses such as: if(d == 0) { return 0; } if(d < 0) { d = Math.Abs(d); } - otherwise you end up with a division by 0 in both. – Fraser Feb 28 '12 at 13:44
  • 3
    @Fraser: Well, there goes the exercise for the reader. Btw, Eric noticed (stackoverflow.com/a/1925170/36388) the negative numbers flaw over two years ago (not the zero one, though). Maybe I should actually fix this code so people stop calling me on it. – P Daddy Feb 29 '12 at 0:40
  • 2
    @PDaddy Yes please fix it. I'd +1 it if it was fixed. I guess a lot of folks wrongly take highly voted answers as copy-and-pasteable. – Eugene Beresovsky Apr 26 '13 at 21:59
21

I've been using pDaddy's sigfig function for a few months and found a bug in it. You cannot take the Log of a negative number, so if d is negative the results is NaN.

The following corrects the bug:

public static double SetSigFigs(double d, int digits)
{   
    if(d == 0)
        return 0;

    decimal scale = (decimal)Math.Pow(10, Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d))) + 1);

    return (double) (scale * Math.Round((decimal)d / scale, digits));
}
  • 1
    For some reason this code won't convert 50.846113537656557 to 6 sigfigs accurately, any ideas? – Andrew Hancox Jan 14 '10 at 14:17
  • What results do you get? – Eric Jan 15 '10 at 0:13
  • 1
    Still do not work with small numbers like 1E-55. – Andrey Ivashov Nov 2 '16 at 10:49
  • 4
    Fails with (0.073699979, 7) returns 0.073699979999999998 – LearningJrDev Dec 9 '16 at 22:45
18

It sounds to me like you don't want to round to x decimal places at all - you want to round to x significant digits. So in your example, you want to round 0.086 to one significant digit, not one decimal place.

Now, using a double and rounding to a number of significant digits is problematic to start with, due to the way doubles are stored. For instance, you could round 0.12 to something close to 0.1, but 0.1 isn't exactly representable as a double. Are you sure you shouldn't actually be using a decimal? Alternatively, is this actually for display purposes? If it's for display purposes, I suspect you should actually convert the double directly to a string with the relevant number of significant digits.

If you can answer those points, I can try to come up with some appropriate code. Awful as it sounds, converting to a number of significant digits as a string by converting the number to a "full" string and then finding the first significant digit (and then taking appropriate rounding action after that) may well be the best way to go.

  • It is for display purposes, I haven't considered a Decimal at all to be honest. How would I go about converting to string with the relevant number of significant digits as you say? I have been unable to find an example in the Double.ToString() method spec. – Rocco Dec 17 '08 at 13:40
  • 1
    @Rocco: I know I am 4 years late, but I just came across your question. I think you should use Double.ToString("Gn"). See my answer of Nov 6 2012 :-) – farfareast Nov 6 '12 at 23:07
14

If it is for display purposes (as you state in the comment to Jon Skeet's answer), you should use Gn format specifier. Where n is the number of significant digits - exactly what you are after.

Here is the the example of usage if you want 3 significant digits (printed output is in the comment of each line):

    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-10.ToString("G3"));//1.23E-10
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-5.ToString("G3")); //1.23E-05
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-4.ToString("G3")); //0.000123
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-3.ToString("G3")); //0.00123
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-2.ToString("G3")); //0.0123
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e-1.ToString("G3")); //0.123
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e2.ToString("G3"));  //123
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e3.ToString("G3"));  //1.23E+03
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e4.ToString("G3"));  //1.23E+04
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e5.ToString("G3"));  //1.23E+05
    Console.WriteLine(1.2345e10.ToString("G3")); //1.23E+10
  • 4
    Although close, this doesn't always return sigfigs... for instance, G4 would remove the zeros from 1.000 --> 1. Also, it forces scientific notation at its discretion, whether you like it or not. – u8it Jul 29 '16 at 20:58
  • 1
    Should probably agree with you on dropping significant zeros in 1.0001. As for the second statement -- the use of scientific notation is decided based on the fact which notation will take less space on print (it's an old FORTRAN rule for G format). So, in a way it is predictable, but if somebody generally prefers scientific format - it is not nice for them. – farfareast Aug 16 '16 at 22:06
6

I found two bugs in the methods of P Daddy and Eric. This solves for example the precision error that was presented by Andrew Hancox in this Q&A. There was also a problem with round directions. 1050 with two significant figures isn't 1000.0, it's 1100.0. The rounding was fixed with MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero.

static void Main(string[] args) {
  double x = RoundToSignificantDigits(1050, 2); // Old = 1000.0, New = 1100.0
  double y = RoundToSignificantDigits(5084611353.0, 4); // Old = 5084999999.999999, New = 5085000000.0
  double z = RoundToSignificantDigits(50.846, 4); // Old = 50.849999999999994, New =  50.85
}

static double RoundToSignificantDigits(double d, int digits) {
  if (d == 0.0) {
    return 0.0;
  }
  else {
    double leftSideNumbers = Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d))) + 1;
    double scale = Math.Pow(10, leftSideNumbers);
    double result = scale * Math.Round(d / scale, digits, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);

    // Clean possible precision error.
    if ((int)leftSideNumbers >= digits) {
      return Math.Round(result, 0, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);
    }
    else {
      return Math.Round(result, digits - (int)leftSideNumbers, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);
    }
  }
}
  • 1
    Fails for RoundToSignificantDigits(.00000000000000000846113537656557, 6) because Math.Round will not allow its second parameter to go beyond 15. – Oliver Bock Dec 14 '12 at 2:48
  • I would argue, 1050 rounded to two significant digits is 1000. Round to even is a very common rounding method. – Derrick Moeller Dec 15 '17 at 14:14
4

As Jon Skeet mentions: better handle this in the textual domain. As a rule: for display purposes, don't try to round / change your floating point values, it never quite works 100%. Display is a secondary concern and you should handle any special formatting requirements like these working with strings.

My solution below I implemented several years ago and has proven very reliable. It has been thoroughly tested and it performs quite well also. About 5 times longer in execution time than P Daddy / Eric's solution.

Examples of input + output given below in code.

using System;
using System.Text;

namespace KZ.SigDig
{
    public static class SignificantDigits
    {
        public static string DecimalSeparator;

        static SignificantDigits()
        {
            System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
            DecimalSeparator = ci.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Format a double to a given number of significant digits.
        /// </summary>
        /// <example>
        /// 0.086 -> "0.09" (digits = 1)
        /// 0.00030908 -> "0.00031" (digits = 2)
        /// 1239451.0 -> "1240000" (digits = 3)
        /// 5084611353.0 -> "5085000000" (digits = 4)
        /// 0.00000000000000000846113537656557 -> "0.00000000000000000846114" (digits = 6)
        /// 50.8437 -> "50.84" (digits = 4)
        /// 50.846 -> "50.85" (digits = 4)
        /// 990.0 -> "1000" (digits = 1)
        /// -5488.0 -> "-5000" (digits = 1)
        /// -990.0 -> "-1000" (digits = 1)
        /// 0.0000789 -> "0.000079" (digits = 2)
        /// </example>
        public static string Format(double number, int digits, bool showTrailingZeros = true, bool alwaysShowDecimalSeparator = false)
        {
            if (Double.IsNaN(number) ||
                Double.IsInfinity(number))
            {
                return number.ToString();
            }

            string sSign = "";
            string sBefore = "0"; // Before the decimal separator
            string sAfter = ""; // After the decimal separator

            if (number != 0d)
            {
                if (digits < 1)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("The digits parameter must be greater than zero.");
                }

                if (number < 0d)
                {
                    sSign = "-";
                    number = Math.Abs(number);
                }

                // Use scientific formatting as an intermediate step
                string sFormatString = "{0:" + new String('#', digits) + "E0}";
                string sScientific = String.Format(sFormatString, number);

                string sSignificand = sScientific.Substring(0, digits);
                int exponent = Int32.Parse(sScientific.Substring(digits + 1));
                // (the significand now already contains the requested number of digits with no decimal separator in it)

                StringBuilder sFractionalBreakup = new StringBuilder(sSignificand);

                if (!showTrailingZeros)
                {
                    while (sFractionalBreakup[sFractionalBreakup.Length - 1] == '0')
                    {
                        sFractionalBreakup.Length--;
                        exponent++;
                    }
                }

                // Place decimal separator (insert zeros if necessary)

                int separatorPosition = 0;

                if ((sFractionalBreakup.Length + exponent) < 1)
                {
                    sFractionalBreakup.Insert(0, "0", 1 - sFractionalBreakup.Length - exponent);
                    separatorPosition = 1;
                }
                else if (exponent > 0)
                {
                    sFractionalBreakup.Append('0', exponent);
                    separatorPosition = sFractionalBreakup.Length;
                }
                else
                {
                    separatorPosition = sFractionalBreakup.Length + exponent;
                }

                sBefore = sFractionalBreakup.ToString();

                if (separatorPosition < sBefore.Length)
                {
                    sAfter = sBefore.Substring(separatorPosition);
                    sBefore = sBefore.Remove(separatorPosition);
                }
            }

            string sReturnValue = sSign + sBefore;

            if (sAfter == "")
            {
                if (alwaysShowDecimalSeparator)
                {
                    sReturnValue += DecimalSeparator + "0";
                }
            }
            else
            {
                sReturnValue += DecimalSeparator + sAfter;
            }

            return sReturnValue;
        }
    }
}
2

Math.Round() on doubles is flawed (see Notes to Callers in its documentation). The later step of multiplying the rounded number back up by its decimal exponent will introduce further floating point errors in the trailing digits. Using another Round() as @Rowanto does won't reliably help and suffers from other problems. However if you're willing to go via decimal then Math.Round() is reliable, as is multiplying and dividing by powers of 10:

static ClassName()
{
    powersOf10 = new decimal[28 + 1 + 28];
    powersOf10[28] = 1;
    decimal pup = 1, pdown = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i < 29; i++) {
        pup *= 10;
        powersOf10[i + 28] = pup;
        pdown /= 10;
        powersOf10[28 - i] = pdown;
    }
}

/// <summary>Powers of 10 indexed by power+28.  These are all the powers
/// of 10 that can be represented using decimal.</summary>
static decimal[] powersOf10;

static double RoundToSignificantDigits(double v, int digits)
{
    if (v == 0.0 || Double.IsNaN(v) || Double.IsInfinity(v)) {
        return v;
    } else {
        int decimal_exponent = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(v))) + 1;
        if (decimal_exponent < -28 + digits || decimal_exponent > 28 - digits) {
            // Decimals won't help outside their range of representation.
            // Insert flawed Double solutions here if you like.
            return v;
        } else {
            decimal d = (decimal)v;
            decimal scale = powersOf10[decimal_exponent + 28];
            return (double)(scale * Math.Round(d / scale, digits, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero));
        }
    }
}
1

This question is similiar to the one you're asking:

Formatting numbers with significant figures in C#

Thus you could do the following:

double Input2 = 234.004223;
string Result2 = Math.Floor(Input2) + Convert.ToDouble(String.Format("{0:G1}", Input2 - Math.Floor(Input2))).ToString("R6");

Rounded to 1 significant digit.

  • That returns 2340.0004 - it least with some localisations. – Gustav Jul 27 '15 at 16:41
1

Let inputNumber be input that needs to be converted with significantDigitsRequired after decimal point, then significantDigitsResult is the answer to the following pseudo code.

integerPortion = Math.truncate(**inputNumber**)

decimalPortion = myNumber-IntegerPortion

if( decimalPortion <> 0 )
{

 significantDigitsStartFrom = Math.Ceil(-log10(decimalPortion))

 scaleRequiredForTruncation= Math.Pow(10,significantDigitsStartFrom-1+**significantDigitsRequired**)

**siginficantDigitsResult** = integerPortion + ( Math.Truncate (decimalPortion*scaleRequiredForTruncation))/scaleRequiredForTruncation

}
else
{

  **siginficantDigitsResult** = integerPortion

}
0

I agree with the spirit of Jon's assessment:

Awful as it sounds, converting to a number of significant digits as a string by converting the number to a "full" string and then finding the first significant digit (and then taking appropriate rounding action after that) may well be the best way to go.

I needed significant-digit rounding for approximate and non-performance-critical computational purposes, and the format-parse round-trip through "G" format is good enough:

public static double RoundToSignificantDigits(this double value, int numberOfSignificantDigits)
{
    return double.Parse(value.ToString("G" + numberOfSignificantDigits));
}
0

for me, this one works pretty fine and is also valid for negative numbers:

public static double RoundToSignificantDigits(double number, int digits)
{
    int sign = Math.Sign(number);

    if (sign < 0)
        number *= -1;

    if (number == 0)
        return 0;

    double scale = Math.Pow(10, Math.Floor(Math.Log10(Math.Abs(number))) + 1);
    return sign * scale * Math.Round(number / scale, digits);
}
-5

Here is something I did in C++

/*
    I had this same problem I was writing a design sheet and
    the standard values were rounded. So not to give my
    values an advantage in a later comparison I need the
    number rounded, so I wrote this bit of code.

    It will round any double to a given number of significant
    figures. But I have a limited range written into the
    subroutine. This is to save time as my numbers were not
    very large or very small. But you can easily change that
    to the full double range, but it will take more time.

    Ross Mckinstray
    rmckinstray01@gmail.com
*/

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <math.h>
#include <cmath>
#include <iomanip>

#using namespace std;

double round_off(double input, int places) {
    double roundA;
    double range = pow(10, 10); // This limits the range of the rounder to 10/10^10 - 10*10^10 if you want more change range;
    for (double j = 10/range; j< 10*range;) {
        if (input >= j && input < j*10){
            double figures = pow(10, places)/10;
            roundA = roundf(input/(j/figures))*(j/figures);
        }
        j = j*10;
    }
    cout << "\n in sub after loop";
    if (input <= 10/(10*10) && input >= 10*10) {
        roundA = input;
        cout << "\nDID NOT ROUND change range";
    }
    return roundA;
}

int main() {
    double number, sig_fig;

    do {
        cout << "\nEnter number ";
        cin >> number;
        cout << "\nEnter sig_fig ";
        cin >> sig_fig;
        double output = round_off(number, sig_fig);

        cout << setprecision(10);
        cout << "\n I= " << number;
        cout << "\n r= " <<output;
        cout << "\nEnter 0 as number to exit loop";
    }
    while (number != 0);

    return 0;
}

Hopefully I did not change anything formatting it.

-6

I just did:

int integer1 = Math.Round(double you want to round, 
    significant figures you want to round to)
  • That only gets you the number of significant digits to the right of the decimal point. – Robert Harvey Jul 22 '14 at 22:06

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