-1

I want to multiply two (float/double) vectors with AVX operators. In order to do that, I need aligned memory. My function for float values is:

#define SIZE 65536
float *g, *h, *j;
g = (float*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(float)*SIZE);
h = (float*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(float)*SIZE);
j = (float*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(float)*SIZE);
//Filling g and h with data
for(int i = 0; i < SIZE/8; i++)
    {
        __m256 a_a, b_a, c_a;
        a_a = _mm256_load_ps(g+8*i);
        b_a = _mm256_load_ps(h+8*i);
        c_a = _mm256_mul_ps(a_a, b_a);
        _mm256_store_ps (j+i*8, c_a);
    }
free(g);
free(h);
free(j);

That works, but when I am trying to do that with double values, I get a memory access error (such as if the memory is not aligned correctly):

double *g_d, *h_d, *i_d;
g_d = (double*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(double)*SIZE);
h_d = (double*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(double)*SIZE);
i_d = (double*)aligned_alloc(32, sizeof(double)*SIZE);
for(int i = 0; i < SIZE/4; i++)
{
    __m256d a_a, b_a, c_a;
    a_a = _mm256_load_pd(g_d+4*i);
    b_a = _mm256_load_pd(h_d+4*i);
    c_a = _mm256_mul_pd(a_a, b_a);
    _mm256_store_pd (i_d+i*4, c_a);
}
free(g_d);
free(h_d);
free(i_d);

Why is the alignment not working for the double-values?

When running it in gdb, I get

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000000000401669 in _mm256_load_pd (__P=0x619f70) at /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/5/include/avxintrin.h:836

Edit: I found my mistake, it was a copy/paste error from a former function, which manifested in that function. Due to not being helpful for others (as I assume), I close the question.

  • 1
    These identifier names suck rocks. What the heck is a, b, d? Always copy/paste code from your text editor. From a test program that has this problem, never make anything up. – Hans Passant May 25 '16 at 9:31
  • Fixed the variables, but will add a short test program later. – arc_lupus May 25 '16 at 10:02
  • 1
    Works for Me (tm). Have you used a debugger? Exactly what line does it fail on and whats the value of the address its reading from (or writing to?). Whats the exact failure code. – Mike Vine May 25 '16 at 10:06
  • @MikeVine: I added the debugger output. – arc_lupus May 25 '16 at 10:43
0

Well, your problem seems to stem from different data sizes.

  • In your first snippet you increment the float loop to SIZE/8=8192. Here I'm unsure why you would increase a FLOAT array with element size 4 by 8. So i < 8192
  • In your second snippet you increment the double loop to SIZE/4=16384. Here I'm unsure why you would increase a DOUBLE array with element size 8 by 4. So i < 16384 --- ** The opposite!**

The last element of the DOUBLE array may surpass your memory boundaries!

In both cases you increment your loop with i++. So the cases proceed as follows:

First : (FLOAT (4)) j+i*8 (0 < i < 8192 ) =>

0      4      8      12      16     20     24     28  
v1     .      v2     .       v3     .      v4     . 

Second: (DOUBLE(8)) j+i*4 (0 < i < 16384) => v1/v2/v3/v4

0      4      8      12      16     20     24     28     32  
v1(h)  v1(l)  v2(l)  v3(l)   v4(l)  v5(l)  v6(l)  v7(l) 
v1(h)  v2(h)  v3(h)  v4(h)   v5(h)  v6(h)  v7(h)  v8(h)  v8(h)
--------------------------------------------------------------
some thing ... some thing ... some thing .. some thing ...

In the second snippet you mix up the high parts(32-bit) and the low parts(32-bit) of the 64-bit Double by only incrementing by 4 (sizeof FLOAT) instead of 8 (sizeof DOUBLE).

Another problem is that _mm256_store_pd requires that...

When the source or destination operand is a memory operand, the operand must be aligned on a 32-byte boundary or a general-protection exception (#GP) will be generated.

for(int i = 0; i < SIZE/4; i++) doesn't fulfill that requirement.

I am wondering that your FLOAT version seems to work, because _mm256_store_ps requires that...

When the source or destination operand is a memory operand, the operand must be aligned on a 16-byte boundary or a general-protection exception (#GP) will be generated.

but you only have an alignment of 8 bytes...

However, you need to fix the 'scale' of your i variable to make this work.

  • 1
    @arc_lupus: If you get correct results, what may have been your real question/problem? I (simply) analyzed your code for potential weaknesses/errors. And I don't know why your test code returns the correct values, I just emphasized potential sources of problems. – zx485 May 25 '16 at 10:45
  • 1
    @arc_lupus: Your question is weird: you said your code isn't working because of a - and I quote - memory access error (such as if the memory is not aligned correctly). I tried to approximate that problem, so what is your's? To put it differently: if you think your code was all OK, why did you ask a question? – zx485 May 25 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    please note that float *x; float* y = x + k; steps by k x sizeof(float) and similar for double, I think your analysis of arc's code is wrong. – BeyelerStudios May 25 '16 at 11:14
  • 1
    @zx485: I think you may be confused here - the factors of 4 and 8 are the number of elements per vector, not the size of the elements in bytes - I think the loop increments are actually correct in the OP's code. – Paul R May 25 '16 at 11:17
  • 1
    @zx485: yes, it's a little confusing, particularly as the OP has used hard-coded literals instead of meaningful constants, but for SIMD loops the increment will be the no of elements per vector, e.g. if you have SIZE floats in an array and you are using AVX vectors with 8 floats per vector, the loop increment will be SIZE / 8. – Paul R May 25 '16 at 11:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.