8

I hope I can describe my challenge in an understandable way. I have two tables on a Oracle Database 12c which look like this:

Table name "Invoices"

I_ID | invoice_number |     creation_date     | i_amount
------------------------------------------------------
  1  |  10000000000   |  01.02.2016 00:00:00  |   30
  2  |  10000000001   |  01.03.2016 00:00:00  |   25
  3  |  10000000002   |  01.04.2016 00:00:00  |   13
  4  |  10000000003   |  01.05.2016 00:00:00  |   18
  5  |  10000000004   |  01.06.2016 00:00:00  |   12

Table name "payments"

P_ID |   reference    |     received_date     | p_amount
------------------------------------------------------
  1  |  PAYMENT01     |  12.02.2016 13:14:12  |   12
  2  |  PAYMENT02     |  12.02.2016 15:24:21  |   28
  3  |  PAYMENT03     |  08.03.2016 23:12:00  |    2
  4  |  PAYMENT04     |  23.03.2016 12:32:13  |   30
  5  |  PAYMENT05     |  12.06.2016 00:00:00  |   15

So I want to have a select statement (maybe with oracle analytic functions but I am not really familiar with it) where the payments are getting summed up till the amount of an invoice is reached, ordered by dates. If the sum of for example two payments is more than the invoice amount the rest of the last payment amount should be used for the next invoice.

In this example the result should be like this:

invoice_number | reference | used_pay_amount | open_inv_amount
----------------------------------------------------------
 10000000000   | PAYMENT01 |       12        |        18
 10000000000   | PAYMENT02 |       18        |         0
 10000000001   | PAYMENT02 |       10        |        15
 10000000001   | PAYMENT03 |        2        |        13
 10000000001   | PAYMENT04 |       13        |         0
 10000000002   | PAYMENT04 |       13        |         0
 10000000003   | PAYMENT04 |        4        |        14
 10000000003   | PAYMENT05 |       14        |         0
 10000000004   | PAYMENT05 |        1        |        11 

It would be nice if there is a solution with a "simple" select statement.

thx in advance for your time ...

  • That would be really doable in PL/Sql , but to be honest i highly doubt it could be done in simple sql – Gar May 25 '16 at 10:47
  • Your example is incorrect - for payment 4, you say the amount was 30, yet in your output results, you have 13 + 13 + 14, which adds up to 40, not 30... – Boneist May 25 '16 at 11:42
  • 1
    @Boneist - I went ahead and corrected that mistake. I also deleted the oracle 12 tag - this problem can be solved in much lower versions of Oracle. – mathguy May 25 '16 at 14:05
8

Oracle Setup:

CREATE TABLE invoices ( i_id, invoice_number, creation_date, i_amount ) AS
SELECT 1, 100000000, DATE '2016-01-01', 30 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 100000001, DATE '2016-02-01', 25 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 3, 100000002, DATE '2016-03-01', 13 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 4, 100000003, DATE '2016-04-01', 18 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 100000004, DATE '2016-05-01', 12 FROM DUAL;

CREATE TABLE payments ( p_id, reference, received_date, p_amount ) AS
SELECT 1, 'PAYMENT01', DATE '2016-01-12', 12 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 'PAYMENT02', DATE '2016-01-13', 28 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 3, 'PAYMENT03', DATE '2016-02-08',  2 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 4, 'PAYMENT04', DATE '2016-02-23', 30 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 'PAYMENT05', DATE '2016-05-12', 15 FROM DUAL;

Query:

WITH total_invoices ( i_id, invoice_number, creation_date, i_amount, i_total ) AS (
  SELECT i.*,
         SUM( i_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY creation_date, i_id )
  FROM   invoices i
),
total_payments ( p_id, reference, received_date, p_amount, p_total ) AS (
  SELECT p.*,
         SUM( p_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY received_date, p_id )
  FROM   payments p
)
SELECT invoice_number,
       reference,
       LEAST( p_total, i_total )
         - GREATEST( p_total - p_amount, i_total - i_amount ) AS used_pay_amount,
       GREATEST( i_total - p_total, 0 ) AS open_inv_amount
FROM   total_invoices
       INNER JOIN
       total_payments
       ON (    i_total - i_amount < p_total
           AND i_total > p_total - p_amount );

Explanation:

The two sub-query factoring (WITH ... AS ()) clauses just add an extra virtual column to the invoices and payments tables with the cumulative sum of the invoice/payment amount.

You can associate a range with each invoice (or payment) as the cumulative amount owing (paid) before the invoice (payment) was placed and the cumulative amount owing (paid) after. The two tables can then be joined where there is an overlap of these ranges.

The open_inv_amount is the positive difference between the cumulative amount invoiced and the cumulative amount paid.

The used_pay_amount is slightly more complicated but you need to find the difference between the lower of the current cumulative invoice and payment totals and the higher of the previous cumulative invoice and payment totals.

Output:

INVOICE_NUMBER REFERENCE USED_PAY_AMOUNT OPEN_INV_AMOUNT
-------------- --------- --------------- ---------------
     100000000 PAYMENT01              12              18
     100000000 PAYMENT02              18               0
     100000001 PAYMENT02              10              15
     100000001 PAYMENT03               2              13
     100000001 PAYMENT04              13               0
     100000002 PAYMENT04              13               0
     100000003 PAYMENT04               4              14
     100000003 PAYMENT05              14               0
     100000004 PAYMENT05               1              11

Update:

Based on mathguy's method of using UNION to join the data, I came up with a different solution re-using some of my code.

WITH combined ( invoice_number, reference, i_amt, i_total, p_amt, p_total, total ) AS (
  SELECT invoice_number,
         NULL,
         i_amount,
         SUM( i_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY creation_date, i_id ),
         NULL,
         NULL,
         SUM( i_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY creation_date, i_id )
  FROM   invoices
  UNION ALL
  SELECT NULL,
         reference,
         NULL,
         NULL,
         p_amount,
         SUM( p_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY received_date, p_id ),
         SUM( p_amount ) OVER ( ORDER BY received_date, p_id )
  FROM   payments
  ORDER BY 7,
           2 NULLS LAST,
           1 NULLS LAST
),
filled ( invoice_number, reference, i_prev, i_total, p_prev, p_total ) AS (
  SELECT FIRST_VALUE( invoice_number )  IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ROWS BETWEEN CURRENT ROW AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING ),
         FIRST_VALUE( reference )       IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ROWS BETWEEN CURRENT ROW AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING ),
         FIRST_VALUE( i_total - i_amt ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ROWS BETWEEN CURRENT ROW AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING ),
         FIRST_VALUE( i_total )         IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ROWS BETWEEN CURRENT ROW AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING ),
         FIRST_VALUE( p_total - p_amt ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ROWS BETWEEN CURRENT ROW AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING ),
         COALESCE(
           p_total,
           LEAD( p_total ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM ),
           LAG( p_total )  IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM )
         )
   FROM  combined
),
vals ( invoice_number, reference, upa, oia, prev_invoice ) AS (
  SELECT invoice_number,
         reference,
         COALESCE( LEAST( p_total - i_total ) - GREATEST( p_prev, i_prev ), 0 ),
         GREATEST( i_total - p_total, 0 ),
         LAG( invoice_number ) OVER ( ORDER BY ROWNUM )
  FROM   filled 
)
SELECT invoice_number,
       reference,
       upa AS used_pay_amount,
       oia AS open_inv_amount
FROM   vals
WHERE  upa > 0
OR     ( reference IS NULL AND invoice_number <> prev_invoice AND oia > 0 );

Explanation:

The combined sub-query factoring clause joins the two tables with a UNION ALL and generates the cumulative totals for the amounts invoiced and paid. The final thing it does is order the rows by their ascending cumulative total (and if there are ties it will put the payments, in order created, before the invoices).

The filled sub-query factoring clause will fill the previously generated table so that if a value is null then it will take the value from the next non-null row (and if there is an invoice with no payments then it will find the total of the previous payments from the preceding rows).

The vals sub-query factoring clause applies the same calculations as my previous query (see above). It also adds the prev_invoice column to help identify invoices which are entirely unpaid.

The final SELECT takes the values and filters out the unnecessary rows.

  • This isn't quite correct, unfortunately - for example, it returns 10000000001 PAYMENT02 28 15 when it should have only used the remaining 10 left of the PAYMENT02 (since 18 was used to pay off the previous invoice). – Boneist May 25 '16 at 11:35
  • @Boneist I noticed that too and it was a reasonably simple fix. – MT0 May 25 '16 at 11:41
  • "reasonably simple"?! I'm still struggling to understand your answer! I think you have a very twisty brain indeed *{;-) (and I mean that as a compliment!) – Boneist May 25 '16 at 11:43
  • It's like you just punched me in the face. That is a great solution. Chapeau. – Ely May 25 '16 at 11:45
  • @Boneist simplified it a bit and added an explanation. – MT0 May 25 '16 at 12:06
1

Here is a solution that doesn't require a join. This is important if the amount of data is significant. I did some testing on my laptop (nothing commercial), using the free edition (XE) of Oracle 11.2. Using MT0's solution, the query with the join takes about 11 seconds if there are 10k invoices and 10k payments. For 50k invoices and 50k payments, the query took 287 seconds (almost 5 minutes). This is understandable, since joining two 50k tables requires 2.5 billion comparisons.

The alternative below uses a union. It uses lag() and last_value() to do the work the join does in the other solution. This union-based solution, with 50k invoices and 50k payments, took less than 0.5 seconds on my laptop (!)

I simplified the setup a bit; i_id, invoice_number and creation_date are all used for one purpose only: to order the invoice amounts. I use just an inv_id (invoice id) for that purpose, and similar for payments..

For testing purposes, I created tables invoices and payments like so:

create table invoices (inv_id, inv_amt) as 
   (select level, trunc(dbms_random.value(20, 80)) from dual connect by level <= 50000);
create table payments (pmt_id, pmt_amt) as 
   (select level, trunc(dbms_random.value(20, 80)) from dual connect by level <= 50000);

Then, to test the solutions, I use the queries to populate a CTAS, like this:

create table bal_of_pmts as
   [select query, including the WITH clause but without the setup CTE's, comes here]

In my solution, I look to show the allocation of payments to one or more invoice, and the payment of invoices from one or more payments; the output discussed in the original post only covers half of this information, but for symmetry it makes more sense to me to show both halves. The output (for the same inputs as in the original post) looks like this, with my version of inv_id and pmt_id:

    INV_ID       PAID     UNPAID     PMT_ID       USED  AVAILABLE
---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
         1         12         18        101         12          0
         1         18          0        103         18         10
         2         10         15        103         10          0
         2          2         13        105          2          0
         2         13          0        107         13         17
         3         13          0        107         13          4
         4          4         14        107          4          0
         4         14          0        109         14          1
         5          1         11        109          1          0
         5         11          0                    11

Notice how the left half is what the original post requested. There is an extra row at the end. Notice the NULL for payment id, for a payment of 11 - that shows how much of the last payment is left uncovered. If there was an invoice with id = 6, for an amount of, say, 22, then there would be one more row - showing the entire amount (22) of that invoice as "paid" from a payment with no id - meaning actually not covered (yet).

The query may be a little easier to understand than the join approach. To see what it does, it may help to look closely at intermediate results, especially the CTE c (in the WITH clause).

with invoices (inv_id, inv_amt) as (
        select   1, 30 from dual union all
        select   2, 25 from dual union all
        select   3, 13 from dual union all
        select   4, 18 from dual union all
        select   5, 12 from dual
     ),
     payments (pmt_id, pmt_amt) as (
        select 101, 12 from dual union all
        select 103, 28 from dual union all
        select 105,  2 from dual union all
        select 107, 30 from dual union all
        select 109, 15 from dual
     ),
     c (kind, inv_id, inv_cml, pmt_id, pmt_cml, cml_amt) as (
        select 'i', inv_id, sum(inv_amt) over (order by inv_id), null, null, 
               sum(inv_amt) over (order by inv_id)
           from invoices
        union all
        select 'p', null, null, pmt_id, sum(pmt_amt) over (order by pmt_id),
               sum(pmt_amt) over (order by pmt_id)
           from payments
     ),
     d (inv_id, paid, unpaid, pmt_id, used, available) as (
        select last_value(inv_id) ignore nulls over (order by cml_amt desc),
               cml_amt - lead(cml_amt, 1, 0) over (order by cml_amt desc),
               case kind when 'i' then 0
                         else last_value(inv_cml) ignore nulls 
                                   over (order by cml_amt desc) - cml_amt end,
               last_value(pmt_id) ignore nulls over (order by cml_amt desc),
               cml_amt - lead(cml_amt, 1, 0) over (order by cml_amt desc),
               case kind when 'p' then 0 
                         else last_value(pmt_cml) ignore nulls
                                   over (order by cml_amt desc) - cml_amt end
        from c
     )
select   inv_id, paid, unpaid, pmt_id, used, available
from     d
where    paid != 0
order by inv_id, pmt_id
;

In most cases, CTE d is all we need. However, if the cumulative sum for several invoices is exactly equal to the cumulative sum for several payments, my query would add a row with paid = unpaid = 0. (MT0's join solution does not have this problem.) To cover all possible cases, and not have rows with no information, I had to add the filter for paid != 0.

  • For the last row of your output paid and used should be 0 and unpaid should be 11 - I know you mention this as a "feature" but the reversed order appears more of a bug. Another issue is if you change the row in payments from select 107, 30 from dual union all to select 107, 26 from dual union all (so that the last invoice is entirely unpaid) then the numbers for invoice 5 are, I think, not correct. – MT0 May 26 '16 at 9:54
  • @MT0 - With pmt_amt changed from 30 to 26 for pmt_id = 107, the last two rows look like the last row in my Answer: inv_id = 4 shows an amount paid = 3 and inv_id = 5 shows paid = 12. 12 is the full amount of the last invoice, so the number is correct. Both issues are one and the same: the treatment of "uncovered" amounts. They are not shown in the ideal way (that would require tweaking the query); but the way I interpret it, what the table shows is simply payments made with pmt_id = NULL, meaning unknown, future payments. (continued below) – mathguy May 26 '16 at 11:15
  • @MT0 - (continued from above) I still prefer to see the remaining unpaid amounts, both from a partially paid invoice and from invoices on which nothing has been paid. I just need to remember (and document!) that pmt_id = NULL means those payments haven't been made yet, they are outstanding. The proper way to show them would be to have yet more columns, for outstanding unpaid amounts (and symmetrically for "credits" left at the end if payments exceed invoices). That can be done, but the point of my solution was different - the use of union instead of join. – mathguy May 26 '16 at 11:18
  • As I read it, when you change the amount from 30 to 26 for payment 107 then the unpaid amount should be 3 after invoice 4 and 3+12=15 after invoice '5' - you do not ignore the previous amount outstanding just because you have a new debt. – MT0 May 26 '16 at 11:36
  • The outstanding unpaid amount is not shown cumulatively (nothing else in the output is cumulative); rather, what the output would show in that case is that there is 3 left unpaid on invoice 4 and another 12 unpaid on invoice 5. That is, it shows not 15 total, but rather 3 unpaid on invoice 4 and 12 unpaid on invoice 5. This is consistent with the purpose of this query in general - everything is broken down by individual invoices and individual payments. The suggestion is not to "ignore" the 3 but to consider all outstanding amounts. – mathguy May 26 '16 at 12:09

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