1

I want to use the volume of the audio that the user inputs with his/her microphone in Unity3d in a visual representation. So I'd like to get a value between 0 and 1 that tell how loud the user is. I went looking for a script, but the part that handles the volume doesn't work properly, that part is the method LevelMax(). For some reason micPosiotion never becomes higher than 0. I don't know what Microphone.GetPosition really does except for this:

http://docs.unity3d.com/ScriptReference/Microphone.GetPosition.html

Does anyone know what goes wrong in the method LevelMax()? I am getting no errors or anything. And it finds my microphone properly, and it is working. I tested it.

This is the code:

using UnityEngine;
using System.Collections;

public class MicInput : MonoBehaviour{

    public float testSound;
    public static float MicLoudness;
    private string _device;
    private AudioClip _clipRecord = new AudioClip();
    private int _sampleWindow = 128;
    private bool _isInitialized;

    void InitMic()
    {
        if (_device == null) {
            _device = Microphone.devices [0];
            _clipRecord = Microphone.Start (_device, true, 999, 44100);
            Debug.Log (_clipRecord);
        }
    }

    void StopMicrophone()
    {
        Microphone.End (_device);
    }

    float LevelMax()
    {
        float levelMax = 0;
        float[] waveData = new float[_sampleWindow];
        int micPosition = Microphone.GetPosition (null) - (_sampleWindow + 1);
        if (micPosition < 0) {
            return 0;
        }
        _clipRecord.GetData (waveData, micPosition);
        for (int i = 0; i < _sampleWindow; ++i) {
            float wavePeak = waveData [i] * waveData [i];
            if (levelMax < wavePeak) {
                levelMax = wavePeak;
            }
        }
        return levelMax;
    }

    void Update()
    {
        MicLoudness = LevelMax ();
        testSound = MicLoudness;

    }

    void OnEnable()
    {
        InitMic ();
        _isInitialized = true;
    }

    void OnDisable()
    {
        StopMicrophone ();
    }

    void OnDestory()
    {
        StopMicrophone ();
    }

    void OnApplicationFocus(bool focus)
    {
        if (focus) {
            if (!_isInitialized) {
                InitMic ();
                _isInitialized = true;
            }
        }

        if (!focus) {
            StopMicrophone ();
            _isInitialized = false;
        }
    }

}

2 Answers 2

4

This script works. I have just tested it and it shows the peak level of the mic in the inspector as the variable testSound. There is something going wrong on your end that is causing it to not begin recording into the audioclip. That is why it is always returning that the micPosition is less than zero.

The only thing that I can see that is slightly off is Microphone.GetPosition(null) inside the LevelMax method. Try changing this to Microphone.GetPosition(_device)

You might also want to try going through your different audio devices by changing the index passed in the line (in the InitMic method):

 _device = Microphone.devices [0];

Try changing this to 1,2,3 etc and see if you are just finding the wrong audio device. If you have more than one mic or are not using the default mic then this could be the problem.


Also, I think you are misunderstanding how digital audio works. GetPosition gets the current sample that the microphone is recording into the audioclip (i.e the latest sample/current sample). This basically means that it gets the amount of samples that have been recorded. You are recording at 44.1Khz samples. That means that every second the audio is being checked 441000 times and a level is assigned to that individual sample. This is called the sample rate and it can be changed. For example CD's use the sample rate 44.1kHz where as digital video tends to use 48kHz. The accuracy of the the sample being recorded is defined by the bit-depth (but you don't have to worry about this). For example CD's use 16bit (which needs to be dithered) whereas digital media uses 24bit(generally). The line:

int micPosition = Microphone.GetPosition(null)-(_sampleWindow+1);

Says "find the amount samples we have recorded 129 samples ago". It then iterates through the values of the next 128 samples and finds the 'loudest' sample and returns it. This is then shown in the inspector. If you don't understand anything I've just said then look into how digital audio is recorded. It's not too complicated to understand the basics of it.

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  • 44100 not 441000
    – clankill3r
    Mar 19, 2018 at 18:56
1

You should check out this thread, but here is the code that may help you:

public class MicInput : MonoBehaviour {

        public static float MicLoudness;

        private string _device;

        //mic initialization
        void InitMic(){
            if(_device == null) _device = Microphone.devices[0];
            _clipRecord = Microphone.Start(_device, true, 999, 44100);
        }

        void StopMicrophone()
        {
            Microphone.End(_device);
        }


        AudioClip _clipRecord = new AudioClip();
        int _sampleWindow = 128;

        //get data from microphone into audioclip
        float  LevelMax()
        {
            float levelMax = 0;
            float[] waveData = new float[_sampleWindow];
            int micPosition = Microphone.GetPosition(null)-(_sampleWindow+1); // null means the first microphone
            if (micPosition < 0) return 0;
            _clipRecord.GetData(waveData, micPosition);
            // Getting a peak on the last 128 samples
            for (int i = 0; i < _sampleWindow; i++) {
                float wavePeak = waveData[i] * waveData[i];
                if (levelMax < wavePeak) {
                    levelMax = wavePeak;
                }
            }
            return levelMax;
        }



        void Update()
        {
            // levelMax equals to the highest normalized value power 2, a small number because < 1
            // pass the value to a static var so we can access it from anywhere
            MicLoudness = LevelMax ();
        }

        bool _isInitialized;
        // start mic when scene starts
        void OnEnable()
        {
            InitMic();
            _isInitialized=true;
        }

        //stop mic when loading a new level or quit application
        void OnDisable()
        {
            StopMicrophone();
        }

        void OnDestroy()
        {
            StopMicrophone();
        }


        // make sure the mic gets started & stopped when application gets focused
        void OnApplicationFocus(bool focus) {
            if (focus)
            {
                //Debug.Log("Focus");

                if(!_isInitialized){
                    //Debug.Log("Init Mic");
                    InitMic();
                    _isInitialized=true;
                }
            }      
            if (!focus)
            {
                //Debug.Log("Pause");
                StopMicrophone();
                //Debug.Log("Stop Mic");
                _isInitialized=false;

            }
        }
    }
4
  • Hi, yes this is the code I found already, I can't see a difference between my and that code. So what is happening with the LevelMax()? May 25, 2016 at 18:43
  • It finds that the micPosition is always lower then 0 May 25, 2016 at 18:43
  • Why do you substact _sampleWindow+1 from Microphone.Getposition(null)? May 25, 2016 at 18:53
  • I will keep my answer due to the link reference, but @gjttt1 have just explained. May 25, 2016 at 20:31

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