44

While reading Keywords That Aren't (or, Comments by Another Name) by Herb Sutter I came across these lines:

That's right, some keywords are semantically equivalent to whitespace, a glorified comment.

And

We've seen why the C++ language treats keywords as reserved words, and we've seen two keywords —auto and register — that make no semantic difference whatsoever to a C++ program. Don't use them; they're just whitespace anyway, and there are faster ways to type whitespace.

If the keywords like auto(maybe not in C++11) and register are of no value, then why were they created and used?

If it doesn't make any difference to include the register before a variable

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){
    register int a = 15;
    printf("%d\n%d\n",&a,a);
    return 0;
}

Why does the above program give an error?

test_register.c: In function ‘main’:

test_register.c:4:2: error: address of register variable ‘a’ requested

printf("%d\n%d\n",&a,a);

The following program works in C++.

#include<iostream>
int main(){
    register int a = 15;
    std::cout<<&a<<'\n'<<a;
    return 0;
}
  • 4
    For compatibility with the C of the time? – juanchopanza May 26 '16 at 9:18
  • 42
    They were of value in the past, when the compiler was not clever enough to decide about register on its own – M.M May 26 '16 at 9:19
  • 5
    It's not relevant in modern C. Possibly it is if you are using an extremely ancient compiler – M.M May 26 '16 at 9:23
  • 9
    @ayushgp & cannot be used on a variable declared as `register – M.M May 26 '16 at 9:40
  • 7
    @ayushgp I don't think it's weird at all, considering the stated meanings. In C, the address of a register variable can't be taken, because the variable is genuinely reserved for register storage. In C++ it can be taken, because the register keyword doesn't mean anything (yet). And it goes without saying that a C frontend will respect C rules, while a C++ frontend will respect C++ rules. – Theodoros Chatzigiannakis May 26 '16 at 9:48
53

register

In C, the register storage class was used as a hint to the compiler, to express that a variable should be preferentially stored in a register. Note that the hint to store a register variable in an actual register may or may not be honored, but in either case the relevant restrictions still apply. See C11, 6.7.1p6 (emphasis mine):

A declaration of an identifier for an object with storage-class specifier register suggests that access to the object be as fast as possible. The extent to which such suggestions are effective is implementation-defined.[footnote 121]

[footnote 121] The implementation may treat any register declaration simply as an auto declaration. However, whether or not addressable storage is actually used, the address of any part of an object declared with storage-class specifier register cannot be computed, either explicitly (by use of the unary & operator as discussed in 6.5.3.2) or implicitly (by converting an array name to a pointer as discussed in 6.3.2.1). Thus, the only operators that can be applied to an array declared with storage-class specifier register are sizeof and _Alignof.

In C++ it is simply an unused reserved keyword, but it's reasonable to assume that it was kept for syntactical compatibility with C code.

auto

In C, the auto storage class defines a variable of automatic storage, but it's not usually used since function-local variables are auto by default.

Similarly, it's reasonable to assume that it was initially carried over to C++ for syntactical compatibility only, although later it got its own meaning (type inference).

  • 2
    the auto keyword is because there's no type in the beginning of C, there are only storage classes Where is the C auto keyword used? – phuclv May 26 '16 at 9:25
  • 3
    @LưuVĩnhPhúc there was always int in C. I think auto hung around from BCPL and they left it in C to make porting code from BCPL to C easier – M.M May 26 '16 at 10:03
  • 1
    M.M: Ironically enough, auto i = 10; was allowed in both K&R and C90 in which case type was inferred using the implicit int rule. – Grzegorz Szpetkowski May 26 '16 at 10:19
  • 9
    Many, many years ago (late 80's) I saw a developer porting our software; he spent a few hours pasting "register" blindly in front of the first three variables in every function, and after that the whole application ran about 30% faster. – gnasher729 May 26 '16 at 15:07
  • 2
    @gnasher729: hope he submitted a feature request on the compiler, "please write a register allocator". – Steve Jessop May 26 '16 at 17:40
25

register in C served two purposes:

  • Hint to the compiler that the variable should be stored in a register for performance. This use is largely obsolete now.
  • Prevent the programmer from using the variable in ways that would prevent it from being stored in a register. This use is only somewhat obsolete IMO.

This is similar to const, which

  • Hints to the compiler that a variable may be stored in read-only memory.
  • Prevents the programmer from writing to the variable

As an example, consider this simplistic function:

int sum(const int *values, size_t length) {
    register int acc = 0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        acc += values[i];
    }
    return acc;
}

The programmer has written register to keep the accumulator off the stack, avoiding a memory write every time it's updated. If the implementation gets changed to something like this:

// Defined in some other translation unit
void add(int *dest, int src);

int sum(const int *values, size_t length) {
    register int acc = 0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        add(&acc, values[i]);
    }
    return acc;
}

The acc variable can no longer be stored in a register when its address is taken for the add() call, because registers have no address. The compiler will thus flag &acc as an error, letting you know that you've probably destroyed the performance of your code by preventing acc from living in a register.

This used to be a lot more important in the early days when compilers were dumber and variables would live in a single place for an entire function. Nowadays a variable can spend most of its life in a register, being moved onto the stack only temporarily when its address is taken. That is, this code:

/* Passed by reference for some reason. */
void debug(const int *value);

int sum(const int *values, size_t length) {
    int acc = 0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        acc += values[i];
    }
    debug(&acc);
    return acc;
}

would have caused acc to live on the stack for the whole function in older compilers. Modern compilers will keep acc in a register until just before the debug() call.

Modern C code does not generally use the register keyword.

  • 2
    IMHO, the register keyword could be very useful if didn't completely forbid the address of a variable from being taken, but allowed the compiler to treat the address thus returned in a fashion similar to a "restrict" pointer. Thus, something like sscanf(st, "%d", &value); could, at the compiler's convenience, be converted to { int temp; sscanf(st, "%d", &temp); value=temp;}; if the benefits of treating value as though its address had never been taken outweighed the cost of creating the temporary. – supercat May 26 '16 at 19:14
  • @supercat Compilers do that kind of transformation anyway! The only restriction you'd be lifting is that currently two log(&acc) calls from within the same function have to see the same address. – Tavian Barnes May 26 '16 at 19:29
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    Presently, compilers are forbidden from keeping a variable of type int in a register while accessing a pointer of type int* if it's possible but not certain that the pointer identifies the variable, and likewise for other types. If a variable's address has never been taken, proving that a pointer of type int* couldn't possibly access it is trivial. If the address has been exposed to outside code, such proof is often much more difficult if not impossible. – supercat May 26 '16 at 19:47
  • 1
    Further, if an automatic variable's address has never been exposed to outside code, it can be cached in a register across calls to outside code. Once the variable has been exposed to outside code, however, its value must be written out to RAM on every subsequent call to outside code. – supercat May 26 '16 at 19:53
  • 2
    I'll note that register is still highly relevant in embedded programming. – chrylis May 27 '16 at 2:49
10

C99 Rationale provides some more context of keyword register:

Rationale for International Standard — Programming Languages — C

§6.7.1 Storage-class specifiers

Because the address of a register variable cannot be taken, objects of storage class register effectively exist in a space distinct from other objects. (Functions occupy yet a third address space.) This makes them candidates for optimal placement, the usual reason for declaring registers; but it also makes them candidates for more aggressive optimization.

  • Worth mentioning that compilers can easily tell if the address of a variable is taken or not, so saying register doesn't convey any additional information. – Mehrdad May 27 '16 at 7:00
  • @Mehrdad: If "register" were allowed for global variables, it could provide very useful information. It could also allow very useful information if code were allowed to take the address of register variables but the address thus taken would be treated as a restrict-qualified pointer [meaning that a compiler would be allowed to keep a variable in a register across all pointer accesses except those which occur between the time a variable's address is taken and the next time that variable is used by name]. – supercat Jun 3 '16 at 16:34

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