32

I have googled and also search on SO for the difference between these buffer modules. However, I still don't understand very well and I think some of the posts I read are out of date.

In Python 2.7.11, I downloaded a binary file of a specific format using r = requests.get(url). Then I passed StringIO.StringIO(r.content), cStringIO.StringIO(r.content) and io.BytesIO(r.content) to a function designed for parsing the content.

All these three methods are available. I mean, even if the file is binary, it's still feasible to use StringIO. Why?

Another thing is concerning their efficiency.

In [1]: import StringIO, cStringIO, io

In [2]: from numpy import random

In [3]: x = random.random(1000000)

In [4]: %timeit y = cStringIO.StringIO(x)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 736 ns per loop

In [5]: %timeit y = StringIO.StringIO(x)
1000 loops, best of 3: 283 µs per loop

In [6]: %timeit y = io.BytesIO(x)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.26 ms per loop

As illustrated above, cStringIO > StringIO > BytesIO.

I found someone mentioned that io.BytesIO always makes a new copy which costs more time. But there are also some posts mentioned that this was fixed in later Python versions.

So, can anyone make a thorough comparison between these IOs, in both latest Python 2.x and 3.x?


Some of the reference I found:

  • https://trac.edgewall.org/ticket/12046

    io.StringIO requires a unicode string. io.BytesIO requires a bytes string. StringIO.StringIO allows either unicode or bytes string. cStringIO.StringIO requires a string that is encoded as a bytes string.

But cStringIO.StringIO('abc') doesn't raise any error.

There is a fix patch in this post in 2014.

  • Lots of SO posts not listed here.

Here are the Python 2.7 results for Eric's example

%timeit cStringIO.StringIO(u_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 488 ns per loop
%timeit cStringIO.StringIO(b_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 448 ns per loop
%timeit StringIO.StringIO(u_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.15 µs per loop
%timeit StringIO.StringIO(b_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.19 µs per loop
%timeit io.StringIO(u_data)
1000 loops, best of 3: 304 µs per loop
# %timeit io.StringIO(b_data)
# error
# %timeit io.BytesIO(u_data)
# error
%timeit io.BytesIO(b_data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 77.5 µs per loop

As for 2.7, cStringIO.StringIO and StringIO.StringIO are far more efficient than io.

3
  • Can you label each of your snippets as python 2 or python 3?
    – Eric
    May 26, 2016 at 13:45
  • @Eric, I did all my tests in Python 2.7.11. It seems (c)StringIO is replaced by io in 3. I mainly use 2.7. But I think it would be meaningful for other readers to discuss both versions.
    – wsdzbm
    May 26, 2016 at 13:55
  • 1
    io is in python 2 as well
    – Eric
    May 26, 2016 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

26

You should use io.StringIO for handling unicode objects and io.BytesIO for handling bytes objects in both python 2 and 3, for forwards-compatibility (this is all 3 has to offer).


Here's a better test (for python 2 and 3), that doesn't include conversion costs from numpy to str/bytes

import numpy as np
import string
b_data = np.random.choice(list(string.printable), size=1000000).tobytes()
u_data = b_data.decode('ascii')
u_data = u'\u2603' + u_data[1:]  # add a non-ascii character

And then:

import io
%timeit io.StringIO(u_data)
%timeit io.StringIO(b_data)
%timeit io.BytesIO(u_data)
%timeit io.BytesIO(b_data)

In python 2, you can also test:

import StringIO, cStringIO
%timeit cStringIO.StringIO(u_data)
%timeit cStringIO.StringIO(b_data)
%timeit StringIO.StringIO(u_data)
%timeit StringIO.StringIO(b_data)

Some of these will crash, complaining about non-ascii characters


Python 3.5 results:

>>> %timeit io.StringIO(u_data)
100 loops, best of 3: 8.61 ms per loop
>>> %timeit io.StringIO(b_data)
TypeError: initial_value must be str or None, not bytes
>>> %timeit io.BytesIO(u_data)
TypeError: a bytes-like object is required, not 'str'
>>> %timeit io.BytesIO(b_data)
The slowest run took 6.79 times longer than the fastest. This could mean that an intermediate result is being cached
1000000 loops, best of 3: 344 ns per loop

Python 2.7 results (run on a different machine):

>>> %timeit io.StringIO(u_data)
1000 loops, best of 3: 304 µs per loop
>>> %timeit io.StringIO(b_data)
TypeError: initial_value must be unicode or None, not str
>>> %timeit io.BytesIO(u_data)
TypeError: 'unicode' does not have the buffer interface
>>> %timeit io.BytesIO(b_data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 77.5 µs per loop
>>> %timeit cStringIO.StringIO(u_data)
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec cant encode character u'\u2603' in position 0: ordinal not in range(128)
>>> %timeit cStringIO.StringIO(b_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 448 ns per loop
>>> %timeit StringIO.StringIO(u_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.15 µs per loop
>>> %timeit StringIO.StringIO(b_data)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.19 µs per loop
14
  • 1
    So in 3.x, BytesIO is distinct from and much faster than StringIO, in contrast to in 2.x.
    – wsdzbm
    May 26, 2016 at 14:15
  • 4
    io.BytesIO and io.StringIO are not comparable, as one only works on binary input, and the other only works on unicode strings
    – Eric
    May 26, 2016 at 14:16
  • 1
    @Lee: Right, that's what I'd expect. cStringIO is unsafe to use on unicode data, as it can fail at runtime depending on the value.
    – Eric
    May 27, 2016 at 11:47
  • 1
    No @stormfield, it is not safer. One is for str, the other is for bytes. Choose based on what type of data you're writing, not on speed.
    – Eric
    Aug 27, 2017 at 23:12
  • 1
    These time tests are not very helpful, because you only measure the time for creating the StringIO object but not the time for using it, which is what really matters. A better test would be to perform multiple reads or call a function such as readlines().
    – interjay
    Feb 14, 2018 at 16:46

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