0

I've start implementing some data structures in C++, starting from Linked Lists. Coming from a Java background, I'm still wrapping my head around pointers and objects lifespans.

LinkedList:

struct Node
{
    int data;
    Node *next;
};

class LinkedList
{
private:
    Node *head;
    Node *tail;
    int length;

public:
    LinkedList();
    ~LinkedList();

    void addToHead(Node &newHead);
    void popHead();

    void printList();
};

and then I've implemented it like this:

LinkedList::LinkedList()
{ 
    head = NULL;
    tail = NULL;
    length = 0;
}

LinkedList::~LinkedList(){}

void LinkedList::addToHead(Node& newHead)
{
    newHead.next = head;
    head = &newHead;
    length++;
}

void LinkedList::popHead()
{
    Node *currHead = head;
    head = head->next;
    length--;
}

void LinkedList::printList()
{
    Node *curr = head;

    while(curr)
    {
        curr = curr->next;  
    }
}

Lastly there's a simple main:

int main()
{
    LinkedList list;
    Node n1 = {3};
    Node n2 = {4};
    Node n3 = {5};
    list.addToHead(n1);
    list.addToHead(n2);
    list.addToHead(n3);
    list.printList();
    list.popHead();
    list.printList();

    return 0;
}

This a rather naive implementation, and I was wondering if I had to provide a proper destructor which deletes the Node* pointers upon iteration. Whenever I've tried to add it, the program results in a memory error, and I was thinking that the memory being allocated is being also deallocated at the end of the main, since all the Node*s live there.

Should I fix my destructor? Should I change the whole interface?

Thanks in advance!

  • 4
    delete is for things created with new. – chris May 26 '16 at 13:39
  • So the Node*s are going to be destroyed when the main() has finished running..? I'm just trying to understand if I'm leaking any memory here – user49428 May 26 '16 at 13:41
  • @user in other words, if you did not use new, you don't have to use delete. If you didn't use new, there is no possibility for memory leaks in your sample – Khalil Khalaf May 26 '16 at 13:43
  • @user49428 n1, n2, and n3 are created on the stack (i.e., not with new) so when they go out of scope the memory they used is made available. Note, the list class holds a pointer to the nodes and the nodes could be destroyed before the list which would leave your list in a bad state (dangling pointers). – James Adkison May 26 '16 at 13:46
  • Not strictly about your problem, but it seems you are learning C++98 / C++03. You're probably better off learning C++11 – there's also C++14, but that only fixed a few small oversights from C++11 so literature about C++11 isn't outdated while I'd definitely call C++98 / C++03 that. – jPlatte May 26 '16 at 13:57
2

Although there are no memory leaks in your code as it stands, I think you should change your interface.

Your linked list isn't doing what you probably think its doing - taking ownership of its contents. A linked list that doesn't own its contents is a strange beast and probably something you did not intend.

One easy way to make it take ownership is to change your design to use std::unique_ptr instead of raw pointers. Your addToHead function would then be change to take std::unique_ptr r-value references pointers (or simply raw pointers that create new std::unique_ptr internally if that's too advanced)

Here is your implementation changed to use std::unique_ptr. Its a bit rough-and-ready, but should get you on your way:

#include <memory>

struct Node
{
    Node(int i) : data(i) 
    {}

    int data;
    std::unique_ptr<Node> next;
};

class LinkedList
{
private:
    std::unique_ptr<Node> head;
    Node *tail;
    int length;

public:
    LinkedList();
    ~LinkedList();

    void addToHead(std::unique_ptr<Node>&& newHead);
    void popHead();

    void printList();
};

LinkedList::LinkedList()
{ 
    head = NULL;
    tail = NULL;
    length = 0;
}

LinkedList::~LinkedList(){}

void LinkedList::addToHead(std::unique_ptr<Node>&& newHead)
{
    newHead->next = std::move(head);
    head = std::move(newHead);
    length++;
}

void LinkedList::popHead()
{
    head = std::move(head->next);
    length--;
}

void LinkedList::printList()
{
    auto* curr = head.get();

    while(curr)
    {
        curr = curr->next.get();  
    }
}

int main()
{
    LinkedList list;
    list.addToHead(std::make_unique<Node>(3));
    list.addToHead(std::make_unique<Node>(4));
    list.addToHead(std::make_unique<Node>(5));
    list.printList();
    list.popHead();
    list.printList();

    return 0;
}
  • any suggestions on what kind of modifications it needs? =) – user49428 May 26 '16 at 13:48
  • as per above edit – Smeeheey May 26 '16 at 13:50
  • There's a good tutorial implementation here. – Martin Véronneau May 26 '16 at 13:54
  • @Smeeheey thanks a lot! – user49428 May 26 '16 at 14:18
  • NULL should be replaced with nullptr – Rob K May 26 '16 at 14:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.