4

I am looking for opinions and possibly a concrete answer to the following.
This question applies for SQL Server version 2008 R2+

In a stored procedure, I have an optional query parameter of type DATE, lets call it @MyVar.

The stored procedure executes the following query:

SELECT A, B, C
FROM MyTable
WHERE MyTable.Field1 = ISNULL(@MyVar,MyTable.Field1)

What is the cost of doing the ISNULL(@MyVar,MyTable.Field1) if @MyVar is NULL? I am wondering if it's better to split the cases such as:

IF (@MyVar IS NULL)
    SELECT A, B, C
    FROM MyTable
ELSE
    SELECT A, B, C
    FROM MyTable
    WHERE MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar

Thanks!

  • 2
    it does prevent use of indexes, since you're comparing field1 against a per-field calculated value, which cannot be indexed. – Marc B May 26 '16 at 14:16
  • You mean WHERE MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar at the end. – jarlh May 26 '16 at 14:16
  • @MarcB I don't see why it would prevent the use of indexes – Lamak May 26 '16 at 14:17
  • 1
    maybe the parser's smart enough to convert OP's query into @honeybadger's version below, but isnull() is a function call, and will be evaluated for every row. all else being equal, isnull's results will not be stored/calculated in advance, meaning that the query will do a full-table scan and evaluate every row. – Marc B May 26 '16 at 14:19
  • Since this is a pattern we often see in things like searches they have come to be known by some as "catch all queries". There are some serious considerations from a performance standpoint to think about. Check out this great article from Gail Shaw on the topic. sqlinthewild.co.za/index.php/2009/03/19/catch-all-queries – Sean Lange May 26 '16 at 14:21
10

A more elegant approach would be:

SELECT A, B, C
FROM   MyTable
WHERE  MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar
   OR  @MyVar IS NULL
OPTION(RECOMPILE)

edit

Based on suggestion by @JamesZ, added option(recompile) so that an index on field1 will be used (if it exists).

edit2 (Thanks @Y.B. for pointing it out.)

If field1 can be null as well use something like:

SELECT A, B, C
    FROM   MyTable
    WHERE  MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar
       OR  (@MyVar IS NULL AND MyTable.Field1 IS NULL)
    OPTION(RECOMPILE)

This already shows the problems with 'catch all' queries. You could also, for example, replace the AND in the last query with OR, which would give yet another (theoretical) result set, but could potentially be correct as well.

  • This still doesn't use indexes, but is definitely simpler to read, although I would add parenthesis to prevent future bugs. – James Z May 26 '16 at 14:19
  • @JamesZ, If more conditions are added, for sure, add parentheses. I'm not sure what you are getting at about the indexes. – HoneyBadger May 26 '16 at 14:20
  • There's a discussion in the comments about index usage -- and if Field1 is indexed, it will not be used even if @MyVar is not null, unless option (recompile) is used. – James Z May 26 '16 at 14:24
  • @JamesZ, interesting, I didn't realize that. Added to answer. – HoneyBadger May 26 '16 at 14:25
  • @HoneyBadger Technically this query output would be different to the OP's first query when MyTable.Field1 IS NULL and @MyVar IS NULL – Y.B. May 26 '16 at 15:52
0

For best performance have 2 procedures, one that takes @MyVar and one that doesn't. That way you get a query plan for each case not the first one you encounter (see parameter sniffing).

Have the client call whichever one makes sense depending on whether you have a value to use or not.

If you're concerned about duplicating code add a view for the guts of your query

SELECT A, B, C
    FROM MyTable

and select from that with conditions that make sense. It's not magic. There is no one size fits all unfortunately.

0

Please note that

SELECT A, B, C
FROM MyTable
WHERE MyTable.Field1 = ISNULL(@MyVar,MyTable.Field1)

would not return records where Field1 is NULL whereas

IF (@MyVar IS NULL)
    SELECT A, B, C
    FROM MyTable
ELSE
    SELECT A, B, C
    FROM MyTable
    WHERE MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar

would.

Technically the correct and efficient way to rewrite the original expression would be:

SELECT A, B, C
FROM MyTable
WHERE @MyVar IS NULL AND MyTable.Field1 IS NOT NULL
UNION ALL
SELECT A, B, C
FROM MyTable
WHERE @MyVar IS NOT NULL AND MyTable.Field1 = @MyVar

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