2377

I'm looking for any alternatives to the below for creating a JavaScript array containing 1 through to N where N is only known at runtime.

var foo = [];

for (var i = 1; i <= N; i++) {
   foo.push(i);
}

To me it feels like there should be a way of doing this without the loop.

7
  • 412
    After reading this entire page, I have come to the conclusion that your own simple for-loop is the simplest, most readable, and least error-prone.
    – Kokodoko
    Commented May 8, 2014 at 16:09
  • 1
    If anyone needs something more advanced, I created a node.js lib that does this for numbers, letters, negative/positive ranges, etc. github.com/jonschlinkert/fill-range. It's used in github.com/jonschlinkert/braces for brace expansion and github.com/jonschlinkert/micromatch for glob patterns Commented Jun 9, 2015 at 5:21
  • Another way of doing it can be like this : Array.from({length : 10}, (_, v) => v) Commented Aug 25, 2019 at 0:15
  • @SahilGupta Almost. If we want 1 to 10, we need to add 1, e.g. this: Array.from({length : 10}, (_, v) => v+1) Commented Oct 13, 2019 at 21:54
  • Instead of an array, define foo as object {} then add your own indexes with foo[i] = i;
    – SPlatten
    Commented Feb 27, 2020 at 13:42

80 Answers 80

1 2
3
3

Try this

const foo = numberOfItems=> [...Array(numberOfItems).keys()].map(i => i+1);
3

Based on high voted answer and its high voted comment.

const range = (from, to) => [...Array(to + 1).keys()].slice(from);

// usage
let test = [];
test = range(5, 10);
console.log(test); // output: [ 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ]
3

no for create array in ES6 solutions

js no for 100 array

1. padStart


// string arr
const arr = [...``.padStart(100, ` `)].map((item, i) => i + 1 + ``);

// (100) ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "11", "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20", "21", "22", "23", "24", "25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "30", "31", "32", "33", "34", "35", "36", "37", "38", "39", "40", "41", "42", "43", "44", "45", "46", "47", "48", "49", "50", "51", "52", "53", "54", "55", "56", "57", "58", "59", "60", "61", "62", "63", "64", "65", "66", "67", "68", "69", "70", "71", "72", "73", "74", "75", "76", "77", "78", "79", "80", "81", "82", "83", "84", "85", "86", "87", "88", "89", "90", "91", "92", "93", "94", "95", "96", "97", "98", "99", "100"]


// number arr
const arr = [...``.padStart(100, ` `)].map((item, i) => i + 1);

// (100) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100]


2. Typed Arrays

Uint8Array

// number arr
const arr = new Uint8Array(100).map((item, i) => i + 1);

// Uint8Array(100) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100]

// string arr
const arr = [...new Uint8Array(100).map((item, i) => i + 1)].map((item, i) => i + 1 + ``);

// (100) ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "11", "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20", "21", "22", "23", "24", "25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "30", "31", "32", "33", "34", "35", "36", "37", "38", "39", "40", "41", "42", "43", "44", "45", "46", "47", "48", "49", "50", "51", "52", "53", "54", "55", "56", "57", "58", "59", "60", "61", "62", "63", "64", "65", "66", "67", "68", "69", "70", "71", "72", "73", "74", "75", "76", "77", "78", "79", "80", "81", "82", "83", "84", "85", "86", "87", "88", "89", "90", "91", "92", "93", "94", "95", "96", "97", "98", "99", "100"]
3

Try this one

[...Array.from({length:30}).keys()]

2

The question was for alternatives to this technique but I wanted to share the faster way of doing this. It's nearly identical to the code in the question but it allocates memory instead of using push:

function range(n) {
    let a = Array(n);
    for (let i = 0; i < n; a[i++] = i);
    return a;
}
2
function arrGen(n) {
  var a = Array(n)
  while (n--) a[n] = n
  return a
}
// arrGen(10) => [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
2

Well, simple but important question. Functional JS definitely lacks a generic unfold method under the Array object since we may need to create an array of numeric items not only simple [1,2,3,...,111] but a series resulting from a function, may be like x => x*2 instead of x => x

Currently, to perform this job we have to rely on the Array.prototype.map() method. However in order to use Array.prototype.map() we need to know the size of the array in advance. Well still.. if we don't know the size, then we can utilize Array.prototype.reduce() but Array.prototype.reduce() is intended for reducing (folding) not unfolding right..?

So obviously we need an Array.unfold() tool in functional JS. This is something that we can simply implement ourselves just like;

Array.unfold = function(p,f,t,s){
  var res = [],
   runner = v =>  p(v,res.length-1,res) ? [] : (res.push(f(v)),runner(t(v)), res);
  return runner(s);
};

Arrays.unfold(p,f,t,v) takes 4 arguments.

  • p This is a function which defines where to stop. The p function takes 3 arguments like many array functors do. The value, the index and the currently resulting array. It shall return a Boolean value. When it returns a true the recursive iteration stops.
  • f This is a function to return the next items functional value.
  • t This is a function to return the next argument to feed to f in the next turn.
  • s Is the seed value that will be used to calculate the comfortable seat of index 0 by f.

So if we intend to create an array filled with a series like 1,4,9,16,25...n^2 we can simply do like.

Array.unfold = function(p,f,t,s){
  var res = [],
   runner = v =>  p(v,res.length-1,res) ? [] : (res.push(f(v)),runner(t(v)), res);
  return runner(s);
};

var myArr = Array.unfold((_,i) => i >= 9, x => Math.pow(x,2), x => x+1, 1);
console.log(myArr);

2

ES5 version, inefficient, but perhaps the shortest one that's an expression, not some statement where a variable is populated with eg. a for loop:

(Array(N)+'').split(',').map(function(d,i){return i})
0
2

// A solution where you do not allocate a N sized array (ES6, with some flow annotation):
function* zeroToN(N /* : number */)/* : Generator<number, void, empty> */ {
  for (let n = 0; n <= N; n += 1) yield n;
}

// With this generation, you can have your array
console.log([...zeroToN(10-1)])

// but let's define a helper iterator function
function mapIterator(iterator, mapping) {
  const arr = [];
  for (let result = iterator.next(); !result.done; result = iterator.next()) {
    arr.push(mapping(result.value));
  }
  return arr;
}

// now you have a map function, without allocating that 0...N-1 array

console.log(mapIterator(zeroToN(10-1), n => n*n));

2

'_'.repeat(5).split('').map((_, i) => i + 1) will yield [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

2

Here is the summary (run in console):

// setup:
var n = 10000000;
function* rangeIter(a, b) {
    for (let i = a; i <= b; ++i) yield i;
}
function range(n) { 
    let a = []
    for (; n--; a[n] = n);
    return a;
}
function sequence(max, step = 1) {
    return {
        [Symbol.iterator]: function* () {
            for (let i = 1; i <= max; i += step) yield i
        }
    }
}

var t0, t1, arr;
// tests
t0 = performance.now();
arr = Array.from({ length: n }, (a, i) => 1)
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("Array.from({ length: n }, (a, i) => 1) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = range(n);
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("range(n) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = Array.from(rangeIter(0, n));
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("Array.from(rangeIter(0, n)) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = [...rangeIter(0, n)];
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("[...rangeIter(0, n)] Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = Array.from(sequence(n));
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("Array.from(sequence(n)) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = [...sequence(n)];
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("[...sequence(n)] Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = Array(n).fill(0).map(Number.call, Number);
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("Array(n).fill(0).map(Number.call, Number) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = Array.from(Array(n).keys());
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("Array.from(Array(n).keys()) Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

t0 = performance.now();
arr = [...Array(n).keys()];
t1 = performance.now();
console.log("[...Array(n).keys()] Took " + (t1 - t0) + " milliseconds.");

The fastest is Array(n).fill(0).map(Number.call, Number), 2nd is [...Array(n).keys()]

But '...rangeIter' way is quite handy (can be inlined), fast and more powerful

1
1

for me this is more useful utility:

/**
 * create an array filled with integer numbers from base to length
 * @param {number} from
 * @param {number} to
 * @param {number} increment
 * @param {Array} exclude
 * @return {Array}
 */
export const count = (from = 0, to = 1, increment = 1, exclude = []) => {
  const array = [];
  for (let i = from; i <= to; i += increment) !exclude.includes(i) && array.push(i);
  return array;
};
0

There is small function, it allow to use construction like [1, 2].range(3, 4) -> [1, 2, 3, 4] also it works with negative params. Enjoy.

Array.prototype.range = function(from, to)
{
   var range = (!to)? from : Math.abs(to - from) + 1, increase = from < to;
   var tmp = Array.apply(this, {"length": range}).map(function()
      {
         return (increase)?from++ : from--;
      }, Number);

   return this.concat(tmp);
};
0

to get array with n random numbers between min, max (not unique though)

function callItWhatYouWant(n, min, max) {
    return Array.apply(null, {length: n}).map(Function.call, function(){return Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+1)+min)})
}
0

For small ranges a slice is nice. N is only known at runtime, so:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5].slice(0, N+1)
4
  • Since you already must write by hand the [0, 1, 2, ...] constant array, why bother to write more than N, then slice that part away? Commented Jan 7, 2015 at 16:46
  • 1
    Because as OP said, "N is only known at run time"
    – dansalmo
    Commented Jan 7, 2015 at 18:25
  • 1
    Then you need to make sure that the constant array is bigger than the N you're going to use.
    – Teepeemm
    Commented Jan 8, 2016 at 15:00
  • Not really, you either get a null list or the entire list if you go to extremes for N
    – dansalmo
    Commented Jan 8, 2016 at 19:27
0

Array.prototype.fill()

a = Object.keys( [].fill.call({length:7}, '' ) ).map(Number)
a.pop();
console.debug(a)

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

0

As there are a lot of good answers this might be an option as well, you can also create a function with the below and it will work for any combination of numbers

const start = 10;
const end = 30;    
const difference = Math.abs(start-end);
const rangeArray = new Array(difference + 1).fill(undefined).map((val, key) => {
    return start > end ? start - key : start + key;
})
0

Example

To generate a string of 1..12 values using the spread operator and adding different elements at the end or at the start.

[
  ...[...Array(12).keys()].map((e) => (e + 1).toString()),
  'hidden',
  'default',
]

/* [
  '1',      '2',
  '3',      '4',
  '5',      '6',
  '7',      '8',
  '9',      '10',
  '11',     '12',
  'hidden', 'default'
]
*/

1
  • Why do you need keys?
    – gene b.
    Commented Jan 17 at 19:08
0

Generate 9 items with a step size of 1, starting with 1:

Array(9).fill(1).map((e,i)=>e+(i*1));

Result:

[ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ]

Generate 9 items with a step size of 5, starting with 5:

Array(9).fill(5).map((e,i)=>e+(i*5));

Result:

[ 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 ]

Execution, user and system time:

Arr size: 1
Execution Time: 3.731ms
User CPU time: 0.033ms
System CPU time: 0.013ms

Arr size: 10
Execution Time: 3.704ms
User CPU time: 0.031ms
System CPU time: 0.01ms

Arr size: 100
Execution Time: 4.001ms
User CPU time: 0.038ms
System CPU time: 0.013ms

Arr size: 1000
Execution Time: 3.735ms
User CPU time: 0.058ms
System CPU time: 0.014ms

Arr size: 10000
Execution Time: 5.185ms
User CPU time: 0.262ms
System CPU time: 0.098ms

Arr size: 100000
Execution Time: 6.937ms
User CPU time: 3.936ms
System CPU time: 0.363ms

Arr size: 1000000
Execution Time: 24.848ms
User CPU time: 17.657ms
System CPU time: 4.185ms
-1

Try this:

var foo = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

If you are using CoffeeScript, you can create a range by doing:

var foo = [1..5]; 

Otherwise, if you are using vanilla JavaScript, you'll have to use a loop if you want to initialize an array up to a variable length.

2
  • 5
    This answer is unfortunately not valid anymore since the OP updated his question.
    – BalusC
    Commented Sep 19, 2010 at 17:46
  • If you can use coffeescript, you can specify a range to quickly create arrays with n elements. For example: arr = [1..10] will produce arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
    – Rui Nunes
    Commented Mar 30, 2016 at 8:55
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