1449

I'm looking for any alternatives to the below for creating a JavaScript array containing 1 through to N where N is only known at runtime.

var foo = [];

for (var i = 1; i <= N; i++) {
   foo.push(i);
}

To me it feels like there should be a way of doing this without the loop.

8
  • 283
    After reading this entire page, I have come to the conclusion that your own simple for-loop is the simplest, most readable, and least error-prone. – Kokodoko May 8 '14 at 16:09
  • If anyone needs something more advanced, I created a node.js lib that does this for numbers, letters, negative/positive ranges, etc. github.com/jonschlinkert/fill-range. It's used in github.com/jonschlinkert/braces for brace expansion and github.com/jonschlinkert/micromatch for glob patterns – jonschlinkert Jun 9 '15 at 5:21
  • Another way of doing it can be like this : Array.from({length : 10}, (_, v) => v) – Sahil Gupta Aug 25 '19 at 0:15
  • @SahilGupta Almost. If we want 1 to 10, we need to add 1, e.g. this: Array.from({length : 10}, (_, v) => v+1) – Eureka Oct 13 '19 at 21:54
  • Instead of an array, define foo as object {} then add your own indexes with foo[i] = i; – SPlatten Feb 27 '20 at 13:42

69 Answers 69

10
Array(8).fill(0).map(Number.call, Number)

Stealing Igors Number.call trick but using fill() to shorten slightly. Only works with ES6 and above.

2
  • This will create a range of numbers from 0 to 7 not from 1 to 8 – Richard Hamilton Jan 5 '17 at 0:29
  • Shorter is simply: Array(5).fill().map((_, i) => i+1) – vsync Oct 24 '20 at 10:06
9

Using ES6

const generateArray = n => [...Array(n)].map((_, index) => index + 1);
2
  • Thanks! This was the most elegant answer in my opinion! One could also use Array.from(Array(n)) if the spread operator is not supported. – Amit Oct 8 '17 at 8:36
  • At first I didn't know why you had to use the spread operator, but then I read the following about map on MDN: "It is not called for missing elements of the array (that is, indexes that have never been set, which have been deleted or which have never been assigned a value)." – battmanz Feb 9 '18 at 19:06
9

Object.keys(Array.apply(0, Array(3))).map(Number)

Returns [0, 1, 2]. Very similar to Igor Shubin's excellent answer, but with slightly less trickery (and one character longer).

Explanation:

  • Array(3) // [undefined × 3] Generate an array of length n=3. Unfortunately this array is almost useless to us, so we have to…
  • Array.apply(0,Array(3)) // [undefined, undefined, undefined] make the array iterable. Note: null's more common as apply's first arg but 0's shorter.
  • Object.keys(Array.apply(0,Array(3))) // ['0', '1', '2'] then get the keys of the array (works because Arrays are the typeof array is an object with indexes for keys.
  • Object.keys(Array.apply(0,Array(3))).map(Number) // [0, 1, 2] and map over the keys, converting strings to numbers.
9

Iterable version using a generator function that doesn't modify Number.prototype.

function sequence(max, step = 1) {
  return {
    [Symbol.iterator]: function* () {
      for (let i = 1; i <= max; i += step) yield i
    }
  }
}

console.log([...sequence(10)])

1
9
Array.from({ length: (stop - start) / step + 1}, (_, i) => start + (i * step));

Source: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/from

9

I would do it this way using ...Array(N).keys()

var foo = [...Array(5).keys()].map(foo => foo + 1)

console.log(foo)

8

You can use a function generator or function* expression. Here's [https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/function] And a reference to the function generator link to [https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/function].

let a = 1, b = 10;

function* range(a, b) { for (var i = a; i <= b; ++i) yield i; }

Array.from(range(a, b)); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

[...range(a, b)] // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

8

A little bit simpler than the string variant:

// create range by N
Array(N).join(0).split(0);

// create a range starting with 0 as the value
Array(7).join(0).split(0).map((v, i) => i + 1) // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

Update (1/4/2018): Updated to address the exact OP question. Thanks @lessless for calling this out!

2
  • how to make it starting from 1? – lessless Mar 27 '15 at 6:42
  • @lessless you'll have to modify the Map: Array(7).join(0).split(0).map(function (v, i) {return i + 1}); – Matt Lo Mar 29 '15 at 17:13
8

You can just do this:

var arr = Array.from(Array(10).keys())
arr.shift()
console.log(arr)

0
7

var foo = Array.from(Array(N), (v, i) => i + 1);

2
  • 4
    Additional context may be helpful to preserve the long-term value of the answer. Please consider adding additional supplementary information to expand on the answer. – Matthew Morek Jun 16 '20 at 13:01
  • (v, i) => i + 1 is a map (see MDN), it takes current index and sets the value to be one more than the index - you get [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] if N = 5 — that's a very elegant solution – revelt Sep 29 '20 at 7:17
6

The following function returns an array populated with numbers:

var createArrayOfNumbers = function (n) {
    return Array.apply(null, new Array(n)).map(function (empty, index) {
        return index;
    });
};

Note that an array created with the array constructor consists of holes, so it cannot be traversed with array functions like map. Hence using the Array.apply function.

6

I didn't see any solution based on recursive functions (and never wrote recursive functions myself) so here is my try.

Note that array.push(something) returns the new length of the array:

(a=[]).push(a.push(a.push(0))) //  a = [0, 1, 2]

And with a recursive function:

var a = (function f(s,e,a,n){return ((n?n:n=s)>e)?a:f(s,e,a?a:a=[],a.push(n)+s)})(start,end) // e.g., start = 1, end = 5

EDIT : two other solutions

var a = Object.keys(new Int8Array(6)).map(Number).slice(1)

and

var a = []
var i=setInterval(function(){a.length===5?clearInterval(i):a.push(a.length+1)}) 
1
  • Object.keys(new Int8Array(N)) is a clever hack, and faster than the Array.apply() and Array.from() solutions, but with ES2015, we have a faster and less weird-looking solution, [...Array(11).keys()].slice(1). – Dan Dascalescu Sep 13 '18 at 23:31
5

I was looking for a functional solution and I ended up with:

function numbers(min, max) {
  return Array(max-min+2).join().split(',').map(function(e, i) { return min+i; });
}

console.log(numbers(1, 9));

Note: join().split(',') transforms the sparse array into a contiguous one.

4
  • 2
    That's a seriously inefficient approach. It creates 3 arrays, a string, and calls a function max - min times. Consider: for (var i=max-min+1, a=[]; i--;) a[i] = min+i; which creates one array and does one loop and is less to write. ;-) – RobG Aug 9 '15 at 23:54
  • See stackoverflow.com/questions/12760643/…, Array.prototype.slice.call(new Float32Array (12)); – Corey Alix Nov 11 '15 at 16:18
  • I was building something similar and settled on return Array((max+1)-min).fill().map((_,i) => i + min);. It dodges the off-by-one issue and works for any number assuming max is bigger than min. – rtpHarry Mar 7 at 1:51
  • (im not sure about efficiency, at the moment I'm just trying to write everything in functional form to get used it) – rtpHarry Mar 7 at 1:52
5

Improvising on the above:

var range = function (n) {
  return Array(n).join().split(',').map(function(e, i) { return i; });
}  

one can get the following options:

1) Array.init to value v

var arrayInitTo = function (n,v) {
  return Array(n).join().split(',').map(function() { return v; });
}; 

2) get a reversed range:

var rangeRev = function (n) {
  return Array(n).join().split(',').map(function() { return n--; });
};
2
  • 1
    The cleanest answer of them all. – Dan Dascalescu Jan 7 '15 at 16:36
  • This answer is perfect for filling a select dropdown in React, Angular or some other framework. Or even just plain vanilla JS. – jorisw Jul 14 '16 at 13:14
3

All of these are too complicated. Just do:

function count(num) {
  var arr = [];
  var i = 0;

  while (num--) {
    arr.push(i++);
  }

  return arr;
}

console.log(count(9))
//=> [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ]

Or to do a range from a to b

function range(a, b) {
  var arr = [];

  while (a < b + 1) {
    arr.push(a++);
  }

  return arr;
}

console.log(range(4, 9))
//=> [ 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ]
3

The least codes I could produce:

for(foo=[x=100]; x; foo[x-1]=x--);
console.log(foo);
3

Try adding an iterator to Number's prototype.

Number.prototype[Symbol.iterator] = function *(){
  let i = 0;
  while(i < this) yield i++;
  return;
}

Now that numbers are iterable, simply pass a number to Array.from

Array.from(10);//[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

or anywhere else an iterable is required, like for...of loops.

for(const number of 10) console.log(number);//logs 0 through 9 sequentially

It's somewhat convoluted, but also cool.

1
3

Try this:

var foo = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

If you are using CoffeeScript, you can create a range by doing:

var foo = [1..5]; 

Otherwise, if you are using vanilla JavaScript, you'll have to use a loop if you want to initialize an array up to a variable length.

2
  • 3
    This answer is unfortunately not valid anymore since the OP updated his question. – BalusC Sep 19 '10 at 17:46
  • If you can use coffeescript, you can specify a range to quickly create arrays with n elements. For example: arr = [1..10] will produce arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] – Rui Nunes Mar 30 '16 at 8:55
3

I found this old thread because I was wondering about the same myself, but I guess none of the answers here were easier than your original example as Kokodoko commented, haha!

I ended up using this method myself:

var foo = [];
while (foo.length < N)
    foo.push( foo.length + 1 );

Which is at least slightly faster to type out than a regular for-loop, and hopefully not error-prone (though it might be more expensive computational-wise).

Can even do something like:

var foo= [];
while (foo.length < N)
    foo.push( foo.length%4 + 1 );

to fill the array with 1-4 multiple times in sequential order. Or use this method to fill the array with a single item, though I guess in that case it might be faster to just use Array(N).fill(x).

3

ES6 solution using recursion. Different than all other solutions

const range = (n, A = []) => (n === 1) ? [n, ...A] : range(n - 1, [n, ...A]);


console.log(range(5));
2
  • How fast is it though, how many iterations occur? More than N? – bluejayke Jun 26 '19 at 16:01
  • 1
    To elaborate on this great answer, both offset and step are supported: Array.from({length: 5}, (v, k) => k* step + offset); – pscl Nov 14 '19 at 22:40
3

Try this

const foo = numberOfItems=> [...Array(numberOfItems).keys()].map(i => i+1);
3

Based on high voted answer and its high voted comment.

const range = (from, to) => [...Array(to + 1).keys()].slice(from);

// usage
let test = [];
test = range(5, 10);
console.log(test); // output: [ 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ]
3

Let's share mine :p

Math.pow(2, 10).toString(2).split('').slice(1).map((_,j) => ++j)
2

Just for fun, I wanted to build off of Ian Henry's answer.

Of course var array = new Array(N); will give you an array of size N, but the keys and values will be identical.... then to shorten the array to size M, use array.length = M.... but for some added functionality try:

function range()
{
    // This function takes optional arguments:
    // start, end, increment
    //    start may be larger or smaller than end
    // Example:  range(null, null, 2);

    var array = []; // Create empty array

      // Get arguments or set default values:
    var start = (arguments[0] ? arguments[0] : 0);
    var end   = (arguments[1] ? arguments[1] : 9);
      // If start == end return array of size 1
    if (start == end) { array.push(start); return array; }
    var inc   = (arguments[2] ? Math.abs(arguments[2]) : 1);

    inc *= (start > end ? -1 : 1); // Figure out which direction to increment.

      // Loop ending condition depends on relative sizes of start and end
    for (var i = start; (start < end ? i <= end : i >= end) ; i += inc)
        array.push(i);

    return array;
}

var foo = range(1, -100, 8.5)

for(var i=0;i<foo.length;i++){
  document.write(foo[i] + ' is item: ' + (i+1) + ' of ' + foo.length + '<br/>'); 
}​

Output of the above:

1 is item: 1 of 12
-7.5 is item: 2 of 12
-16 is item: 3 of 12
-24.5 is item: 4 of 12
-33 is item: 5 of 12
-41.5 is item: 6 of 12
-50 is item: 7 of 12
-58.5 is item: 8 of 12
-67 is item: 9 of 12
-75.5 is item: 10 of 12
-84 is item: 11 of 12
-92.5 is item: 12 of 12

jsFiddle example

This function makes use of the automatically generated arguments array.

The function creates an array filled with values beginning at start and ending at end with increments of size increment, where

range(start, end, increment);

Each value has a default and the sign of the increment doesn't matter, since the direction of incrementation depends on the relative sizes of start and end.

2

The question was for alternatives to this technique but I wanted to share the faster way of doing this. It's nearly identical to the code in the question but it allocates memory instead of using push:

function range(n) {
    let a = Array(n);
    for (let i = 0; i < n; a[i++] = i);
    return a;
}
2
function arrGen(n) {
  var a = Array(n)
  while (n--) a[n] = n
  return a
}
// arrGen(10) => [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
2

ES5 version, inefficient, but perhaps the shortest one that's an expression, not some statement where a variable is populated with eg. a for loop:

(Array(N)+'').split(',').map(function(d,i){return i})
2
  • 1
    Whoever downvotes without giving some insight denies others (and/or himself) some lessons to learn. – Robert Monfera Jun 19 '18 at 9:14
  • 1
    Agreed...I offset the unjustified downvote for you :) – Petro Jun 29 '18 at 23:17
2

// A solution where you do not allocate a N sized array (ES6, with some flow annotation):
function* zeroToN(N /* : number */)/* : Generator<number, void, empty> */ {
  for (let n = 0; n <= N; n += 1) yield n;
}

// With this generation, you can have your array
console.log([...zeroToN(10-1)])

// but let's define a helper iterator function
function mapIterator(iterator, mapping) {
  const arr = [];
  for (let result = iterator.next(); !result.done; result = iterator.next()) {
    arr.push(mapping(result.value));
  }
  return arr;
}

// now you have a map function, without allocating that 0...N-1 array

console.log(mapIterator(zeroToN(10-1), n => n*n));

2

'_'.repeat(5).split('').map((_, i) => i + 1) will yield [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

2

no for create array in ES6 solutions

js no for 100 array

1. padStart


// string arr
const arr = [...``.padStart(100, ` `)].map((item, i) => i + 1 + ``);

// (100) ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "11", "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20", "21", "22", "23", "24", "25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "30", "31", "32", "33", "34", "35", "36", "37", "38", "39", "40", "41", "42", "43", "44", "45", "46", "47", "48", "49", "50", "51", "52", "53", "54", "55", "56", "57", "58", "59", "60", "61", "62", "63", "64", "65", "66", "67", "68", "69", "70", "71", "72", "73", "74", "75", "76", "77", "78", "79", "80", "81", "82", "83", "84", "85", "86", "87", "88", "89", "90", "91", "92", "93", "94", "95", "96", "97", "98", "99", "100"]


// number arr
const arr = [...``.padStart(100, ` `)].map((item, i) => i + 1);

// (100) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100]


2. Typed Arrays

Uint8Array

// number arr
const arr = new Uint8Array(100).map((item, i) => i + 1);

// Uint8Array(100) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100]

// string arr
const arr = [...new Uint8Array(100).map((item, i) => i + 1)].map((item, i) => i + 1 + ``);

// (100) ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "11", "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20", "21", "22", "23", "24", "25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "30", "31", "32", "33", "34", "35", "36", "37", "38", "39", "40", "41", "42", "43", "44", "45", "46", "47", "48", "49", "50", "51", "52", "53", "54", "55", "56", "57", "58", "59", "60", "61", "62", "63", "64", "65", "66", "67", "68", "69", "70", "71", "72", "73", "74", "75", "76", "77", "78", "79", "80", "81", "82", "83", "84", "85", "86", "87", "88", "89", "90", "91", "92", "93", "94", "95", "96", "97", "98", "99", "100"]

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