179

We are running Jenkins 2.x and love the new Pipeline plugin. However, with so many branches in a repository, disk space fills up quickly.

Is there any plugin that's compatible with Pipeline that I can wipe out the workspace on a successful build?

14 Answers 14

157

Like @gotgenes pointed out with Jenkins Version. 2.74, the below works, not sure since when, maybe if some one can edit and add the version above

cleanWs()

With, Jenkins Version 2.16 and the Workspace Cleanup Plugin, that I have, I use

step([$class: 'WsCleanup'])

to delete the workspace.

You can view it by going to

JENKINS_URL/job/<any Pipeline project>/pipeline-syntax

Then selecting "step: General Build Step" from Sample step and then selecting "Delete workspace when build is done" from Build step

2
  • This works for me: Jenkins 2.7.2, Workspace Cleanup Plugin 0.30
    – dsh
    Aug 24, 2016 at 21:31
  • 4
    According to this PR, included in 0.33, this is called in the pipeline as cleanWs.
    – gotgenes
    Sep 18, 2017 at 18:51
127

You can use deleteDir() as the last step of the pipeline Jenkinsfile (assuming you didn't change the working directory).

6
  • 9
    I have problems with deleteDir(). It seems to randomly not able to delete the current directory when the node gets build on a slave. The build fails of course if this happens. So be aware if your jobs fail randomly. I don't understand why node not just cleans it workspace when the node starts building. Because the node can run anywhere you can't make any assumptions about the files in the workspace anyway.
    – ssindelar
    Jul 7, 2016 at 13:39
  • 1
    But I think will only delete the workspace on the current node. In the general case your pipeline will runs on several different slaves. Aug 23, 2016 at 13:45
  • 25
    I put this at the beggining right before checkout scm.
    – jpbochi
    Sep 5, 2016 at 10:59
  • 2
    I put this at the beginning also, in case the project fails before it reaches the end, or the next build is on a different slave. Nov 23, 2016 at 14:47
  • 2
    This is the command documented to clean up the workspace in the "Cleaning up and notifications" section of the Jenkins documentation.
    – vossad01
    Jan 21, 2018 at 3:03
124

The mentioned solutions deleteDir() and cleanWs() (if using the workspace cleanup plugin) both work, but the recommendation to use it in an extra build step is usually not the desired solution. If the build fails and the pipeline is aborted, this cleanup-stage is never reached and therefore the workspace is not cleaned on failed builds.

=> In most cases you should probably put it in a post-built-step condition like always:

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        stage('Example') {
            steps {
                echo 'Hello World'
            }
        }
    }
    post { 
        always { 
            cleanWs()
        }
    }
}
2
  • 6
    This was absolutely key for my use case. I need to archive artifacts from the job, and running cleanWs() as a step deletes them before the post build archive command runs. cleanWs() should most likely always be run as a post build command
    – Brandon
    Jan 5, 2018 at 23:55
  • 34
    If you have only one post section, cleanWs() can safely be put into the always condition, but the safest spot is inside the cleanup condition: post { cleanup { cleanWs() } } Jun 13, 2018 at 15:54
72

In fact the deleteDir function recursively deletes the current directory and its contents. Symbolic links and junctions will not be followed but will be removed.

To delete a specific directory of a workspace wrap the deleteDir step in a dir step.

dir('directoryToDelete') {
    deleteDir()
}
1
  • 10
    Although the OP asked merely how to delete the workspace, this answer is the most informative. Nov 8, 2016 at 18:40
30

Using the following pipeline script:

pipeline {
    agent { label "master" }
    options { skipDefaultCheckout() }
    stages {
        stage('CleanWorkspace') {
            steps {
                cleanWs()
            }
        }
    }
}

Follow these steps:

  1. Navigate to the latest build of the pipeline job you would like to clean the workspace of.
  2. Click the Replay link in the LHS menu.
  3. Paste the above script in the text box and click Run
3
  • 1
    Add options { skipDefaultCheckout() } for a little faster execution.
    – AkisK
    Apr 9, 2019 at 8:11
  • Improved answer with your suggestion @AkisK Jul 2, 2019 at 3:47
  • Seems like this is the only option that works for cleaning up the workspace BEFORE and NOT AFTER executing a pipeline, even though I didn't want to have a separate step for just clean up. Thank you Jul 9, 2019 at 15:08
28

I used deleteDir() as follows:

  post {
        always {
            deleteDir() /* clean up our workspace */
        }
    }

However, I then had to also run a Success or Failure AFTER always but you cannot order the post conditions. The current order is always, changed, aborted, failure, success and then unstable.

However, there is a very useful post condition, cleanup which always runs last, see https://jenkins.io/doc/book/pipeline/syntax/

So in the end my post was as follows :

post {
    always {

    }
    success{

    }
    failure {

    }
    cleanup{
        deleteDir()
    }
}

Hopefully this may be helpful for some corner cases

2
  • 1
    We get an error "invalid condition cleanup", we are using Jenkins version 2.89 Dec 7, 2018 at 8:20
  • In my opnion, this is one of the best answer, however, I would recommand to not delete the data in the failing case such as you are keeping debug data. Moreover, deleting the data at the beginning is also a good solution.
    – White
    Sep 21, 2021 at 11:14
17

If you have used custom workspace in Jenkins then deleteDir() will not delete @tmp folder.

So to delete @tmp along with workspace use following

pipeline {
    agent {
        node {
            customWorkspace "/home/jenkins/jenkins_workspace/${JOB_NAME}_${BUILD_NUMBER}"
        }
    }
    post {
        cleanup {
            /* clean up our workspace */
            deleteDir()
            /* clean up tmp directory */
            dir("${workspace}@tmp") {
                deleteDir()
            }
            /* clean up script directory */
            dir("${workspace}@script") {
                deleteDir()
            }
        }
    }
}

This snippet will work for default workspace also.

4
  • 1
    Also works with a dockerized pipeline. Very helpful, thanks!
    – mcw
    Jul 1, 2019 at 20:10
  • 1
    This is also the only answer I've seen that can kill the annoying @libs folder too Aug 28, 2019 at 12:54
  • what is the difference between cleanWs and deleteDir?
    – White
    Sep 27, 2021 at 6:27
  • 1
    @White stackoverflow.com/questions/54019121/… Sep 28, 2021 at 3:56
9

Using the 'WipeWorkspace' extension seems to work as well. It requires the longer form:

checkout([
   $class: 'GitSCM',
   branches: scm.branches,
   extensions: scm.extensions + [[$class: 'WipeWorkspace']],
   userRemoteConfigs: scm.userRemoteConfigs
])

More details here: https://support.cloudbees.com/hc/en-us/articles/226122247-How-to-Customize-Checkout-for-Pipeline-Multibranch-

Available GitSCM extensions here: https://github.com/jenkinsci/git-plugin/tree/master/src/main/java/hudson/plugins/git/extensions/impl

8

For Jenkins 2.190.1 this works for sure:

    post {
        always {
            cleanWs deleteDirs: true, notFailBuild: true
        }
    }
7
pipeline {
    agent any

    tools {nodejs "node"}
    
    environment {

    }

    parameters {
        string(name: 'FOLDER', defaultValue: 'ABC', description: 'FOLDER', trim: true)

    }

    stages {
        stage('1') {
            steps{
            }
        }
        stage("2") {
            steps {
            }     
        }
    }
    post {
        always {
            echo "Release finished do cleanup and send mails"
            deleteDir()
        }
        success {
            echo "Release Success"
        }
        failure {
            echo "Release Failed"
        }
        cleanup {
            echo "Clean up in post work space"
            cleanWs()
        }
    }
}
1
  • 3
    what is the difference between cleanWs and deleteDir? upvoted you Jul 9, 2021 at 17:37
4

We make sure we are working with a clean workspace by using a feature of the git plugin. You can add additional behaviors like 'Clean before checkout'. We use this as well for 'Prune stale remote-tracking branches'.

3

In my case, I want to clear out old files at the beginning of the build, but this is problematic since the source code has been checked out.

My solution is to ask git to clean out any files (from the last build) that it doesn't know about:

    sh "git clean -x -f"

That way I can start the build out clean, and if it fails, the workspace isn't cleaned out and therefore easily debuggable.

1

Cleaning up : Since the post section of a Pipeline is guaranteed to run at the end of a Pipeline’s execution, we can add some notification or other steps to perform finalization, notification, or other end-of-Pipeline tasks.

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        stage('No-op') {
            steps {
                sh 'ls'
            }
        }
    }
    post {
        cleanup {
            echo 'One way or another, I have finished'
            deleteDir() /* clean up our workspace */
        }
    }
}
1
  • This does not work when having stages running on different slaves!
    – sirineBEJI
    Jun 4, 2018 at 15:32
0

Currently both deletedir() and cleanWs() do not work properly when using Jenkins kubernetes plugin, the pod workspace is deleted but the master workspace persists

it should not be a problem for persistant branches, when you have a step to clean the workspace prior to checkout scam. It will basically reuse the same workspace over and over again: but when using multibranch pipelines the master keeps the whole workspace and git directory

I believe this should be an issue with Jenkins, any enlightenment here?

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