100

I'm doing an INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE for a PRIMARY KEY in the following table:

DESCRIBE users_interests;
+------------+---------------------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field      | Type                            | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+------------+---------------------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| uid        | int(11)                         | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| iid        | int(11)                         | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| preference | enum('like','dislike','ignore') | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+------------+---------------------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+

However, even though these values should be unique, I'm seeing 2 rows affected.

INSERT INTO users_interests (uid, iid, preference) VALUES (2, 2, 'like')
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE preference='like';
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.04 sec)

Why is this happening?

EDIT

For comparison, see this query:

UPDATE users_interests SET preference='like' WHERE uid=2 AND iid=2;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.44 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0
6
  • Why do you have two primary keys in the first place?
    – Pekka
    Sep 19 '10 at 20:28
  • 1
    @Pekka, the PRIMARY KEY is a single pk created on (uid, iid) since most queries will be run when both values are known.
    – Josh Smith
    Sep 19 '10 at 20:35
  • 1
    @Josh I see. The manual seems to discourage it though: In general, you should try to avoid using an ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE clause on tables with multiple unique indexes. Does it need to be a primary key? Why not a normal index?
    – Pekka
    Sep 19 '10 at 20:35
  • @Pekka, honestly not sure. I'm still relatively new to this. Does an index make more sense in this case?
    – Josh Smith
    Sep 19 '10 at 20:37
  • 3
    @Josh yup, a normal index spanning both columns should would work fine here
    – Pekka
    Sep 19 '10 at 20:42
213

From the manual:

With ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE, the affected-rows value per row is 1 if the row is inserted as a new row and 2 if an existing row is updated.

7
  • 18
    And 0 if an existing row is set to its current values.
    – Svish
    Feb 3 '17 at 22:40
  • 1
    @Svish, Thanks! This is really helpful.
    – Green
    Jun 5 '17 at 0:10
  • 2
    I just wonder what would be the rationale behind it.. clearly, it could have been returned as response code instead of number of rows affected to make it less confusing Dec 9 '19 at 11:21
  • 1
    ... :|. Is there a way to determine the actual number of rows affected? Even if an existing row is updated, there is still only one row affected Dec 23 '19 at 12:59
  • Is this the same for batch inserts as well? … VALUES (2, 2, 'like'), (3, 3, 'like'), (4, 4, 'like') ON DUPLICATE … Jun 17 '20 at 23:39
7

So you know whether you updated a row (duplicate key) or just inserted one: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert-on-duplicate.html

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.