17

Does Julia have a build in command to find the index of the minimum of a vector? R, for example, has a which.min command (and a which.max, of course).

Obviously, I could write the following myself, but it would be nice not to have to.

function whichmin( x::Vector )
  i = 1
  min_x=minimum(x)
  while( x[i] > min_x ) 
    i+=1 
  end
  return i
end

Apologies if this has been asked before, but I couldn't find it. Thanks!

1
  • You want max or min? Your question title says, min, but the answers are max. :D
    – hola
    Jun 9, 2017 at 9:35

4 Answers 4

22

Since 0.7-alpha, indmin and indmax are deprecated. Use argmin and argmax instead.

For a vector it just returns the linear index

julia> x = rand(1:9, 4)
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 9
 5
 8
 5

julia> argmin(x)
2

julia> argmax(x)
1

If looking for both the index and the value, use findmin and findmax.

For multidimensional array, all these functions return the CartesianIndex.

1
  • Finally! It is much more reasonable. The ind2sub answer was really annoying.
    – Po C.
    Jul 2, 2018 at 1:24
9

I believe indmax(itr) does what you want. From the julia documentation:

indmax(itr) → Integer

Returns the index of the maximum element in a collection.

And here's an example of it in use:

julia> x = [8, -4, 3.5]
julia> indmax(x)
1
2
  • @squipbar to help others, please note that this solution is no longer current as of Julia v1.0, should tick another solution.
    – xiaodai
    Sep 24, 2018 at 3:52
  • yep, for julia >= 1 use argmax() instead of indmax()
    – Antonello
    Feb 27, 2020 at 15:00
9

There's also findmax, that returns both the maximum value and its position.

2
  • 1
    For a 2D array, findmax returns one integer instead of the 2D location
    – hola
    May 19, 2017 at 11:54
  • @pushpen.paul do you know how to find the original-D location, then?
    – NHDaly
    Jan 15, 2018 at 22:32
1

For multidim array, you'll have to switch between linear indexes et multidim indexes:

x = rand(1:9, 2,3)
# 2×3 Array{Int64,2}:
#  5  1  9
#  3  3  8

indmin(x)
# 3 
# => third element in the column-major ordered array (value=1)

ind2sub(size(x),indmin(x))
# (1, 2)
# => (row,col) indexes: what you are looking for.

-- Maurice

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